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NEWS
February 6, 2006
Across the country, coal mines have been asked by federal officials to "Stand Down for Safety" today - to take time off to go over safety procedures. The unusual national focus on improving mine safety follows, of course, the deaths of 16 West Virginia miners just this year. And it mirrors a time-out for safety Thursday in that state. But a day of emphasis on safety cannot make up for years of lax mine safety regulation and enforcement by the Bush administration, as detailed in a report released last Tuesday by the Democratic staff of the House Committee on Education and Workforce.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
The families of two Western Maryland coal miners who died in a 2007 accident filed a lawsuit Thursday against the strip mine's operator, contending that unsafe conditions led to their deaths. The $4 million suit was brought by the widows and children of Michael R. Wilt and Dale Jones. The two men were working in a coal pit in Barton on April 17, 2007, when an unstable "highwall" collapsed, raining some 93,000 tons of rock and material on their heavy-equipment vehicles. The federal Mine Safety and Health Administration cited the operator, Tri-Star Mining Inc., for violations that it said contributed to the accident.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 2, 2006
CRAIGSVILLE, W.Va. -- In its drive to foster a more cooperative relationship with mining companies, the Bush administration has decreased major fines for safety violations since 2001, and in nearly half the cases, it has not collected the fines, according to a data analysis by The New York Times. Federal records also show that in the past two years the federal mine safety agency has failed to hand over any delinquent cases to the Treasury Department for further collection efforts, as is supposed to occur after 180 days.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | April 7, 2010
An underground explosion that killed at least 25 coal miners was so powerful that it tossed rail cars and twisted steel tracks, officials said Tuesday, as workers continued efforts to find four missing miners who might have survived the blast. Crews worked feverishly Tuesday to carve an access road and drill three 1,000-foot ventilation shafts into the mountain to release the lethal buildup of methane gas and carbon monoxide that officials believe might have caused the disaster, as well as a fourth tunnel for rescue operations.
NEWS
By Robyn Blumner | September 4, 2007
A lot of people tell me that they are sick of both political parties. They claim the parties are essentially the same and it doesn't matter who is in power, because the Democrats and the Republicans are in the pocket of special interests and equally disengaged from the concerns and needs of average people. To that, I proffer this example about mine safety, something in the news lately because of the Crandall Canyon Mine disaster. Say you are a miner, a historically dangerous job in which more than 100,000 of your compatriots have perished since 1900.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
The families of two Western Maryland coal miners who died in a 2007 accident filed a lawsuit Thursday against the strip mine's operator, contending that unsafe conditions led to their deaths. The $4 million suit was brought by the widows and children of Michael R. Wilt and Dale Jones. The two men were working in a coal pit in Barton on April 17, 2007, when an unstable "highwall" collapsed, raining some 93,000 tons of rock and material on their heavy-equipment vehicles. The federal Mine Safety and Health Administration cited the operator, Tri-Star Mining Inc., for violations that it said contributed to the accident.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | April 5, 1991
The U.S. Labor Department issued record fines of almost $5 million against operators of nearly half the nation's coal mines yesterday, charging widespread tampering with the coal dust-sampling devices that are designed to protect miners from black lung disease.In a 20-month investigation, the agency said it found 4,710 silver-dollar-size sampling filters that were tampered with at 847 mining operations, including four in Maryland."I am appalled at the flagrant disregard for a law designed to protect coal miners against disabling lung disease," Labor Secretary Lynn Martin said.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 13, 2005
QITAIHE, China - The sign near the small coal mine where Liu Quanju's husband and son died makes clear in bold red characters that, at least in words, the government supports mine safety: "Managing methane is a great responsibility. Fulfill your duty at work and inspect conscientiously." Such signs urging safety in coal mines are as ubiquitous as the proclamations by political leaders on the subject. But in a state where propaganda often runs counter to reality, all the posters and proclamations serve merely to underscore just how unsafe China's coal mines are. Many mine operators and their government patrons are reaping financial windfalls from the nation's energy-hungry economic boom, by producing as much coal as possible as cheaply as possible - a credo that is not recorded on propaganda signs.
NEWS
By Timothy Wheeler and Timothy Wheeler,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2007
BARTON -- Everyone seems to know everyone else -- or their family -- in this small mountain town nestled in the George's Creek Valley of Western Maryland. And since Tuesday, nearly everyone has been at least a little on edge waiting for news about two coal miners buried under thousands of tons of rock and dirt. With each passing day, slender hopes are dwindling. "I think we just feel bad for the families," said Jennifer Brandlen, who was tending bar yesterday at the American Legion Hall.
NEWS
By Nicholas Riccardi, Judy Pasternak and Stephen Braun and Nicholas Riccardi, Judy Pasternak and Stephen Braun,Los Angeles Times | August 18, 2007
HUNTINGTON, Utah -- The deaths of three rescuers caught in an explosive coal blowout while digging toward a team of trapped miners left this mining region torn yesterday over how to proceed, as federal officials suspended the disastrous underground search. Shaken by a string of setbacks in the rescue effort and then by the catastrophic "seismic bump" Thursday night, Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. urged the rescue organizers to "send no one else into that mine until they can guarantee their safety."
NEWS
By Robyn Blumner | September 4, 2007
A lot of people tell me that they are sick of both political parties. They claim the parties are essentially the same and it doesn't matter who is in power, because the Democrats and the Republicans are in the pocket of special interests and equally disengaged from the concerns and needs of average people. To that, I proffer this example about mine safety, something in the news lately because of the Crandall Canyon Mine disaster. Say you are a miner, a historically dangerous job in which more than 100,000 of your compatriots have perished since 1900.
NEWS
By Nicholas Riccardi, Judy Pasternak and Stephen Braun and Nicholas Riccardi, Judy Pasternak and Stephen Braun,Los Angeles Times | August 18, 2007
HUNTINGTON, Utah -- The deaths of three rescuers caught in an explosive coal blowout while digging toward a team of trapped miners left this mining region torn yesterday over how to proceed, as federal officials suspended the disastrous underground search. Shaken by a string of setbacks in the rescue effort and then by the catastrophic "seismic bump" Thursday night, Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. urged the rescue organizers to "send no one else into that mine until they can guarantee their safety."
NEWS
By Timothy Wheeler and Timothy Wheeler,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2007
BARTON -- Everyone seems to know everyone else -- or their family -- in this small mountain town nestled in the George's Creek Valley of Western Maryland. And since Tuesday, nearly everyone has been at least a little on edge waiting for news about two coal miners buried under thousands of tons of rock and dirt. With each passing day, slender hopes are dwindling. "I think we just feel bad for the families," said Jennifer Brandlen, who was tending bar yesterday at the American Legion Hall.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 2, 2006
CRAIGSVILLE, W.Va. -- In its drive to foster a more cooperative relationship with mining companies, the Bush administration has decreased major fines for safety violations since 2001, and in nearly half the cases, it has not collected the fines, according to a data analysis by The New York Times. Federal records also show that in the past two years the federal mine safety agency has failed to hand over any delinquent cases to the Treasury Department for further collection efforts, as is supposed to occur after 180 days.
NEWS
February 6, 2006
Across the country, coal mines have been asked by federal officials to "Stand Down for Safety" today - to take time off to go over safety procedures. The unusual national focus on improving mine safety follows, of course, the deaths of 16 West Virginia miners just this year. And it mirrors a time-out for safety Thursday in that state. But a day of emphasis on safety cannot make up for years of lax mine safety regulation and enforcement by the Bush administration, as detailed in a report released last Tuesday by the Democratic staff of the House Committee on Education and Workforce.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Since the Bush administration took office in 2001, it has been more lenient toward mining companies facing serious safety violations, issuing fewer and smaller major fines and collecting less than half of the money that violators owed, a Knight Ridder Newspapers investigation has found. At one point last year, the Mine Safety and Health Administration fined a coal company a scant $440 for a "significant and substantial" violation that ended in the death of a Kentucky man. The firm, International Coal Group Inc., is the same company that owns the Sago Mine in West Virginia, where 12 workers died last week.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | April 7, 2010
An underground explosion that killed at least 25 coal miners was so powerful that it tossed rail cars and twisted steel tracks, officials said Tuesday, as workers continued efforts to find four missing miners who might have survived the blast. Crews worked feverishly Tuesday to carve an access road and drill three 1,000-foot ventilation shafts into the mountain to release the lethal buildup of methane gas and carbon monoxide that officials believe might have caused the disaster, as well as a fourth tunnel for rescue operations.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Since the Bush administration took office in 2001, it has been more lenient toward mining companies facing serious safety violations, issuing fewer and smaller major fines and collecting less than half of the money that violators owed, a Knight Ridder Newspapers investigation has found. At one point last year, the Mine Safety and Health Administration fined a coal company a scant $440 for a "significant and substantial" violation that ended in the death of a Kentucky man. The firm, International Coal Group Inc., is the same company that owns the Sago Mine in West Virginia, where 12 workers died last week.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 13, 2005
QITAIHE, China - The sign near the small coal mine where Liu Quanju's husband and son died makes clear in bold red characters that, at least in words, the government supports mine safety: "Managing methane is a great responsibility. Fulfill your duty at work and inspect conscientiously." Such signs urging safety in coal mines are as ubiquitous as the proclamations by political leaders on the subject. But in a state where propaganda often runs counter to reality, all the posters and proclamations serve merely to underscore just how unsafe China's coal mines are. Many mine operators and their government patrons are reaping financial windfalls from the nation's energy-hungry economic boom, by producing as much coal as possible as cheaply as possible - a credo that is not recorded on propaganda signs.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | April 5, 1991
The U.S. Labor Department issued record fines of almost $5 million against operators of nearly half the nation's coal mines yesterday, charging widespread tampering with the coal dust-sampling devices that are designed to protect miners from black lung disease.In a 20-month investigation, the agency said it found 4,710 silver-dollar-size sampling filters that were tampered with at 847 mining operations, including four in Maryland."I am appalled at the flagrant disregard for a law designed to protect coal miners against disabling lung disease," Labor Secretary Lynn Martin said.
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