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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | October 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- No one has ever expected very much from the U.S. National team. But Bora Milutinovic is changing that."It is the most difficult job I've ever had," says the new coach, smiling happily. "This is such a big country, such a big public. I wanted this job and now I have to make good in the World Cup. Yes, it is difficult, but it is also very exciting to have the opportunity to show the world Americans can be competitive in soccer."It was almost a miracle when the U.S. team broke a 40-year streak by qualifying for the 1990 World Cup. The fact it didn't win a game in that tournament didn't surprise anyone.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 20, 1998
PARIS -- Before these World Cup finals began, Bora Milutinovic was very close to losing his job for the second time in a year. Yesterday, the cosmopolitan Yugoslav became the first man to lead four different teams into the World Cup's second round.Nigeria, Milutinovic's latest and potentially greatest project, clinched its spot yesterday with a 1-0 victory over Bulgaria that was nowhere nearly as conservative as its score.Several hours later, after the other Group D match between Spain and Paraguay had ended in a scoreless draw, Nigeria also clinched first place in a group that was widely considered the most daunting in this event.
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By Julie Cart and Julie Cart,Los Angeles Times | March 28, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- As expected, Bora Milutinovic, a Yugoslav who has coached the World Cup teams of Mexico and Costa Rica, was named coach of the United States national soccer team yesterday. He replaced Bob Gansler, who resigned last month after two years in the job.Milutinovic, 46, was introduced at a news conference in New York and on a conference call to reporters."It's a big challenge," Milutinovic said of coaching the U.S. team, which as host of the 1994 World Cup will automatically qualify for the tournament.
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By Jerry Trecker and Jerry Trecker,The Hartford Courant | April 23, 1995
Janusz Michallik, who might have as much reason as anyone to toss a barb in Bora Milutinovic's direction, won't say a bad word about the national team coach who was dumped by U.S. Soccer last week.Michallik, who made it to the final cut before being left off the World Cup roster last year, said Milutinovic was the victim of a change of thinking at the top levels of an administration that may not be fully aware of what it has lost."[U.S. Soccer] wants to change the whole system," Michallik, a 28-year old midfielder, said after learning of Milutinovic's "resignation" Friday morning.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Bora Milutinovic looks and acts like some daffy college professor killing time between lectures. His brown, shaggy hair flies out in every direction, and his thick, brown-rimmed glasses are perched crookedly on the bridge of his nose.He enters a room speaking bits of English, Spanish and Serbo-Croatian. Before you know it, he produces a putter and is sending golf balls bouncing along the carpet.Then he is shaking hands with someone who, within 15 minutes, will be his new best friend.
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By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,Contributing Writer | January 16, 1993
Clad in a red, white and blue warm-up suit, he stood on a podium, mapping out plays with magic markers and showing game-action videotape.His English was broken, and sometimes he relied on his interpreter.But U.S. national soccer team coach Bora Milutinovic got his message across.Speaking to a roomful of college, high school and recreational soccer coaches during the National Soccer Coaches Association of America Conference at the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday, Milutinovic pointed out some of the problems with American soccer players.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
It's eight months before World Cup '94 comes to the United States. The U.S. national team has only a 7-10-10 record this season, but U.S. coach Bora Milutinovic is nowhere near the panic stage yet.Not one drop of sweat."
SPORTS
By Jerry Trecker and Jerry Trecker,The Hartford Courant | April 23, 1995
Janusz Michallik, who might have as much reason as anyone to toss a barb in Bora Milutinovic's direction, won't say a bad word about the national team coach who was dumped by U.S. Soccer last week.Michallik, who made it to the final cut before being left off the World Cup roster last year, said Milutinovic was the victim of a change of thinking at the top levels of an administration that may not be fully aware of what it has lost."[U.S. Soccer] wants to change the whole system," Michallik, a 28-year old midfielder, said after learning of Milutinovic's "resignation" Friday morning.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
It's eight months before World Cup '94 comes to the United States. The U.S. national team has only a 7-10-10 record this season, but U.S. coach Bora Milutinovic is nowhere near the panic stage yet.Not one drop of sweat."
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | August 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Bashing Americans for their lack of interest in soccer is a favorite pastime, especially every four years when the World Cup takes center stage.But yesterday, none other than U.S. National Team soccer coach Bora Milutinovic came to the defense of this country when he was given the opportunity to join the bashing."The most important thing is results," said the native of the former Yugoslavia. "If we get good results, we get good promotion of the game. The only thing Americans care about is being first.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | July 5, 1994
PALO ALTO, Calif. -- No player threw a chair. No one cursed. Not one tear.U.S. players talked about being disappointed after yesterday's 1-0 loss to Brazil eliminated the Americans from the World Cup, but the sense of accomplishment exceeded any grief."
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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun Staff Writer | June 18, 1994
Desmond Armstrong is too busy to be bitter.Armstrong, who was introduced to soccer in Columbia and still ** makes his home there, is an accomplished illustrator with a one-man show at the Soccer Hall of Fame. He's the father of two pre-schoolers and partner in a venture that could bring a new soccer complex to western Howard County.The former Howard High and University of Maryland star has played in more international matches for the United States than any other African-American, and his desire to spread the game to the inner city will be aided by his role as studio analyst on ABC's telecasts of the World Cup.Armstrong is excited about the prospect of working with Jim McKay, but he would prefer teaming with Tony Meola, Thomas Dooley and the rest of the United States team, which begins Group A play against Switzerland at the Pontiac Silverdome today.
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By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | March 14, 1994
U.S. national team coach Bora Milutinovic isn't changing his ++ flat-four zone defense despite his players' pleas.L But he should, says Hubert Vogelsinger, a former NASL coach."
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 14, 1993
MISSION VIEJO, Calif. -- With hopes of erasing memories of that suffocating afternoon at Azteca last July, the U.S. national soccer team resumed its pre-World Cup schedule last night in a rematch with Mexico at RFK Stadium in Washington.The stakes aren't nearly so high, and the teams bear merely passing resemblance to those that met in the Mexico City massacre, but today's friendliness isn't nearly as meaningless as it appears."It's not that you want to get revenge," says U.S. midfielder Dominic Kinnear.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
It's eight months before World Cup '94 comes to the United States. The U.S. national team has only a 7-10-10 record this season, but U.S. coach Bora Milutinovic is nowhere near the panic stage yet.Not one drop of sweat."
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | October 13, 1993
It's eight months before World Cup '94 comes to the United States. The U.S. national team has only a 7-10-10 record this season, but U.S. coach Bora Milutinovic is nowhere near the panic stage yet.Not one drop of sweat."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | March 28, 1991
NEW YORK -- Picture this:It is 1994, the World Cup is under way, and the U.S. soccer team has made it to the second round, upsetting the status quo. Now it has designs on the championship. Crowds fill stadiums wherever the American team is playing, and the chants are deafening:"Bor-a! Bor-a! Bor-a!"It has a familiar ring, like "De-Fense! De-Fense!" But this is not American football, this is soccer and it has captured the imagination of America. The man they are cheering is Bora Milutinovic, who has turned the U.S. team into a heavyweight contender for the Cup.Is that picture only a dream?
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 14, 1993
MISSION VIEJO, Calif. -- With hopes of erasing memories of that suffocating afternoon at Azteca last July, the U.S. national soccer team resumed its pre-World Cup schedule last night in a rematch with Mexico at RFK Stadium in Washington.The stakes aren't nearly so high, and the teams bear merely passing resemblance to those that met in the Mexico City massacre, but today's friendliness isn't nearly as meaningless as it appears."It's not that you want to get revenge," says U.S. midfielder Dominic Kinnear.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | August 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Bashing Americans for their lack of interest in soccer is a favorite pastime, especially every four years when the World Cup takes center stage.But yesterday, none other than U.S. National Team soccer coach Bora Milutinovic came to the defense of this country when he was given the opportunity to join the bashing."The most important thing is results," said the native of the former Yugoslavia. "If we get good results, we get good promotion of the game. The only thing Americans care about is being first.
SPORTS
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,Contributing Writer | January 16, 1993
Clad in a red, white and blue warm-up suit, he stood on a podium, mapping out plays with magic markers and showing game-action videotape.His English was broken, and sometimes he relied on his interpreter.But U.S. national soccer team coach Bora Milutinovic got his message across.Speaking to a roomful of college, high school and recreational soccer coaches during the National Soccer Coaches Association of America Conference at the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday, Milutinovic pointed out some of the problems with American soccer players.
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