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Milton Friedman

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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | March 4, 1996
SO THIS IS HOW economic history restarts.A few months ago, the economic certainties were: death, taxes, the futility of central planning, the virtue of free trade and the eternity of "Hogan's Heroes" in syndication.Free trade may have required more faith, like Mrs. Clinton's explanation of how the Whitewater bills got lost inside her house. But if anyone still wondered whether free trade had been admitted to the canon of conventional wisdom, Ann Landers removed the doubts.Last September, "Annemarie in Philadelphia" wanted Ann to save U.S. jobs by asking everybody to boycott imports.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 22, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- The death last week of Milton Friedman, "the grandmaster of free-market economic theory," as The New York Times accurately labeled him, ended a great life. But there was another Milton Friedman many obituary writers overlooked, or mentioned only in passing, that may offer him an even greater legacy than his economic theories about limited government. In the last 10 of his 94 years, Mr. Friedman and his wife, Rose, dedicated themselves to school choice. They viewed it as a companion to economic freedom.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 22, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- The death last week of Milton Friedman, "the grandmaster of free-market economic theory," as The New York Times accurately labeled him, ended a great life. But there was another Milton Friedman many obituary writers overlooked, or mentioned only in passing, that may offer him an even greater legacy than his economic theories about limited government. In the last 10 of his 94 years, Mr. Friedman and his wife, Rose, dedicated themselves to school choice. They viewed it as a companion to economic freedom.
NEWS
By Jonathan Peterson and Jonathan Peterson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Milton Friedman, a brilliant champion of free-market economics and individual freedom who almost single-handedly altered the boundaries of public debate on an array of national issues, died yesterday in San Francisco. He was 94. The cause was heart failure, said Robert Fanger, a spokesman for the Milton and Rose D. Friedman Foundation in Indianapolis. Mr. Friedman was considered a leading economic thinker of the 20th century. His many prescriptions for policy, notably on managing the nation's money supply and curbing the welfare state, influenced presidents and presidential candidates starting in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Jonathan Peterson and Jonathan Peterson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Milton Friedman, a brilliant champion of free-market economics and individual freedom who almost single-handedly altered the boundaries of public debate on an array of national issues, died yesterday in San Francisco. He was 94. The cause was heart failure, said Robert Fanger, a spokesman for the Milton and Rose D. Friedman Foundation in Indianapolis. Mr. Friedman was considered a leading economic thinker of the 20th century. His many prescriptions for policy, notably on managing the nation's money supply and curbing the welfare state, influenced presidents and presidential candidates starting in the 1960s.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 24, 1994
It seemed like a good time to call Jeff Levin, who is my Council of Economic Adviser, and find out how bad 1994 is going to be.In the past, I have never been able to determine whether Levin is a pessimist or just whether the economy has not given him very much to be happy about.Back in 1990, when I first interviewed him, Levin accurately predicted the recession of 1991 and also accurately predicted that white-collar workers would be hit as hard or harder than blue-collar workers.Levin has an M.B.A.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | April 6, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- Why are we in Kosovo? Because we have no draft. This war, in the air or on the ground, means nothing to most Americans. The military, all volunteers, go about their business and the rest of us go about ours.On the campus of the University of Southern California, where I lecture on the relationship between presidents and the press, there are more than 20,000 young Americans. You can walk from one end of the campus to the other on a fine, sunny day in the spring and never hear the word "Kosovo."
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | April 4, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- Why are we in Kosovo? Because we have no draft. This war, in the air or on the ground, means nothing to most Americans.The military, all volunteers, go about their business and the rest of us go about ours.On the campus of the University of Southern California, there are more than 20,000 young Americans. You can walk from one end of the campus to the other on a sunny spring day and never hear the word "Kosovo."Why should they ask questions? This has nothing to do with the lives of almost all of the students here.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | March 16, 1992
With income taxes due in one month, we clear our writing surface to make room for Form 1040 and its supporting papers. What follows are workplace notes, quotes, ideas, etc., that recently piled up on the desk.HOPEFULLY HELPFUL: Here are hints for effectively reprimanding subordinates: "Do not smile; smiling indicates approval. Reprimand as soon as possible after the problem occurs. Explain specifically what was wrong and how it fell short of expectations. Make it clear that you are criticizing just one particular action, not the employee's work in general.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | December 9, 1991
Washington. -- George Stigler won the Nobel Prize for economics, but few Americans knew of him last week when he died, full of years (80 of them) and honors. What should have pleased him most was this fact: The Cold War is over and the University of Chicago won it.Stigler exemplified the ''Chicago school'' of economics, named for the university where he taught with Milton Friedman (another Nobel laureate), Friedrich von Hayek (another), Frank Knight (who should have been one) and Ronald Coase (this year's winner)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Haner and By Jim Haner,Sun Staff | July 28, 2002
Cocaine: An Unauthorized Biography, by Dominic Streatfeild. St. Martin's Press. 498 pages. $27.95. It has been said that there is no greater sensation on earth than a cocaine high. In very short order, a snort of the glimmering white powder produces an overwhelming feeling of well-being, mental clarity and boundless energy -- not to mention a sort of post-orgasmic glow in the solar plexus. Smoking it only intensifies the feeling. Injecting it, well, that defies description. Given a limitless supply of the stuff in their water, laboratory animals will abandon food, sleep, sex, grooming and all other drugs, dosing themselves until they literally die of exhaustion.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | April 6, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- Why are we in Kosovo? Because we have no draft. This war, in the air or on the ground, means nothing to most Americans. The military, all volunteers, go about their business and the rest of us go about ours.On the campus of the University of Southern California, where I lecture on the relationship between presidents and the press, there are more than 20,000 young Americans. You can walk from one end of the campus to the other on a fine, sunny day in the spring and never hear the word "Kosovo."
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | April 4, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- Why are we in Kosovo? Because we have no draft. This war, in the air or on the ground, means nothing to most Americans.The military, all volunteers, go about their business and the rest of us go about ours.On the campus of the University of Southern California, there are more than 20,000 young Americans. You can walk from one end of the campus to the other on a sunny spring day and never hear the word "Kosovo."Why should they ask questions? This has nothing to do with the lives of almost all of the students here.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | January 19, 1997
Libertarianism, David Boaz writes, "is the view that each person has the right to live in any way he chooses so long as he respects the equal rights of others ... Libertarians defend each person's right to life, liberty and property - rights that people possess naturally, before governments are created. In the libertarian view, all human relationships should be voluntary; the only actions that should be forbidden by law are those that involve the initiation of force against those who have not themselves used force."
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | March 4, 1996
SO THIS IS HOW economic history restarts.A few months ago, the economic certainties were: death, taxes, the futility of central planning, the virtue of free trade and the eternity of "Hogan's Heroes" in syndication.Free trade may have required more faith, like Mrs. Clinton's explanation of how the Whitewater bills got lost inside her house. But if anyone still wondered whether free trade had been admitted to the canon of conventional wisdom, Ann Landers removed the doubts.Last September, "Annemarie in Philadelphia" wanted Ann to save U.S. jobs by asking everybody to boycott imports.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 24, 1994
It seemed like a good time to call Jeff Levin, who is my Council of Economic Adviser, and find out how bad 1994 is going to be.In the past, I have never been able to determine whether Levin is a pessimist or just whether the economy has not given him very much to be happy about.Back in 1990, when I first interviewed him, Levin accurately predicted the recession of 1991 and also accurately predicted that white-collar workers would be hit as hard or harder than blue-collar workers.Levin has an M.B.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Haner and By Jim Haner,Sun Staff | July 28, 2002
Cocaine: An Unauthorized Biography, by Dominic Streatfeild. St. Martin's Press. 498 pages. $27.95. It has been said that there is no greater sensation on earth than a cocaine high. In very short order, a snort of the glimmering white powder produces an overwhelming feeling of well-being, mental clarity and boundless energy -- not to mention a sort of post-orgasmic glow in the solar plexus. Smoking it only intensifies the feeling. Injecting it, well, that defies description. Given a limitless supply of the stuff in their water, laboratory animals will abandon food, sleep, sex, grooming and all other drugs, dosing themselves until they literally die of exhaustion.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | January 19, 1997
Libertarianism, David Boaz writes, "is the view that each person has the right to live in any way he chooses so long as he respects the equal rights of others ... Libertarians defend each person's right to life, liberty and property - rights that people possess naturally, before governments are created. In the libertarian view, all human relationships should be voluntary; the only actions that should be forbidden by law are those that involve the initiation of force against those who have not themselves used force."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | March 16, 1992
With income taxes due in one month, we clear our writing surface to make room for Form 1040 and its supporting papers. What follows are workplace notes, quotes, ideas, etc., that recently piled up on the desk.HOPEFULLY HELPFUL: Here are hints for effectively reprimanding subordinates: "Do not smile; smiling indicates approval. Reprimand as soon as possible after the problem occurs. Explain specifically what was wrong and how it fell short of expectations. Make it clear that you are criticizing just one particular action, not the employee's work in general.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | December 9, 1991
Washington. -- George Stigler won the Nobel Prize for economics, but few Americans knew of him last week when he died, full of years (80 of them) and honors. What should have pleased him most was this fact: The Cold War is over and the University of Chicago won it.Stigler exemplified the ''Chicago school'' of economics, named for the university where he taught with Milton Friedman (another Nobel laureate), Friedrich von Hayek (another), Frank Knight (who should have been one) and Ronald Coase (this year's winner)
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