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Milton Berle

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By New York Times News Service | July 28, 1992
The good news this summer is, it's never too late to get into shape.The messenger is Milton Berle, who just turned 84 and has been named special adviser to Arnold Schwarzenegger, chairman of the president's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.Mr. Berle will appear in a public service television announcement, riding a bike and hitting a speed bag to promote exercise for older adults.Mr. Berle said through a spokesman that his doctor tells him he has the body of a 40-year-old. He said that by the 21st century people will live to 120 "if they exercise, watch their diet and stay away from stress."
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NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | April 29, 2007
As the May TV sweeps period gets under way, ABC's hit Desperate Housewives will attempt to lure new viewers tonight with the well-worn tactic of a catfight between two sexy stars. But over on Fox later this ratings period, fans of Bones will find something new for network TV at the online social networking site MySpace: profiles, complete with fictional video diaries and blogs of suspects and potential victims who will later appear in an episode of the popular crime series. The writers of Bones have created for the show a full-blown companion universe in cyberspace just in time for sweeps, a four-week period during which audience measurements are used to set advertising rates.
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NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 28, 2002
Milton Berle, television's first superstar and the man who came to be known as "Mr. Television," died at his home yesterday afternoon at the age of 93. With Mr. Berle at the time of his death were his wife, Lorna, and other family members, according to longtime Berle publicist Warren Cowan. The performer was diagnosed with colon cancer last year and had been in hospice care the past few weeks, according to the Associated Press. Mr. Berle's death, like the birth of his Tuesday-night television variety show in 1948, is a milestone moment in the history of the medium that has come to so dominate American life.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,Tribune Media Services | October 29, 2006
When famous people retire, it's fascinating to see what they do with themselves. Johnny Carson disappeared from the public eye and played tennis after he retired as host of The Tonight Show. I would see cigar-chomping Milton Berle in the halls of NBC decades after The Milton Berle Show ended. He did TV and movie guest shots. Former President Jimmy Carter has been talking publicly about tensions with North Korea. In 1994, after his presidency, he obtained an agreement with North Korea that it would stop processing nuclear fuels in exchange for normalization of relations.
NEWS
March 30, 2002
THOSE BIG luscious lips and those big front teeth that looked as though they ought to be at work somewhere building a beaver dam and those big awful jokes that were so bad you just couldn't wait for the next one. That was Milton Berle. Was it really 54 years ago that he put television on the map with NBC's Texaco Star Theater? Yeah, and you know what? He'd already been in show business 34 years by that time. That's the startling thing. Vaudeville, where the young comedian got his start, was closer to early TV than early TV is to us. Men and women who had played the circuits, living out of trunks and traveling by train, brought a whole ethic of live entertainment and hard work and greasepaint and slapstick and being funny to those early days of the tube.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 29, 2002
Wednesday night, after reporting and writing my obituary of Milton Berle, I sat down with a stack of cassettes of Texaco Star Theater shows that I had been allowed to copy from various university archives over the years. As I had done with Carroll O'Connor, Steve Allen and several other television pioneers who have passed away in recent years, I let the flickering images of Berle wash over me in that darkened room until I found one that I could freeze-frame in memory, say goodbye to and move on with my life.
FEATURES
March 29, 2002
Milton Berle earned his nickname - "The Thief of Bad Gags" - through such one-liners as these, from his book, Milton Berle's Private Joke File. "I'm so henpecked I cackle in my sleep! Marriage is one of the few institutions that allow a man to do as his wife pleases. Last month I put in a rock garden. Two of them were dead in the morning!"
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,Tribune Media Services | October 29, 2006
When famous people retire, it's fascinating to see what they do with themselves. Johnny Carson disappeared from the public eye and played tennis after he retired as host of The Tonight Show. I would see cigar-chomping Milton Berle in the halls of NBC decades after The Milton Berle Show ended. He did TV and movie guest shots. Former President Jimmy Carter has been talking publicly about tensions with North Korea. In 1994, after his presidency, he obtained an agreement with North Korea that it would stop processing nuclear fuels in exchange for normalization of relations.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | May 30, 1993
Q: How valuable is my mint-condition 12-inch-high metal eight-day clock by Le Coultre? It resembles an old street lamp from the famous Rue de la Paix in Paris. It's still in its original box. -- H.A.N., Newark, Del.A: Your mass-produced die-cast metal novelty desk clock dates from the 1930s or 1940s and is worth around $200 in good working condition, according to antique-clock dealer Kenneth Sposato, 46 Gedney Park Drive, White Plains, N.Y. 10605, (914) 948-4995. Novelty clocks were produced by many manufacturers and are appealing because they're amusing and nostalgic, but they rarely sell for more than a few hundred dollars each, added dealer Gordon Converse, 1029 Lancaster Ave., Berwyn, Pa. 19312, (215)
FEATURES
By Robert W. Welkos and Robert W. Welkos,Los Angeles Times | July 7, 1993
It was billed as Milton Berle's 85th Birthday Celebration, a star-studded dinner during which the comedian known to the world as "Mr. Television" received a lifetime achievement award from a group calling itself the Poetry Academy.The ballroom of the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif., was packed Saturday night with more than 1,000 guests who had come to honor "Uncle Miltie." They included more than 150 celebrities decked out in tuxedos and evening gowns and hundreds of poets from all over the United States, Canada and beyond.
NEWS
March 30, 2002
THOSE BIG luscious lips and those big front teeth that looked as though they ought to be at work somewhere building a beaver dam and those big awful jokes that were so bad you just couldn't wait for the next one. That was Milton Berle. Was it really 54 years ago that he put television on the map with NBC's Texaco Star Theater? Yeah, and you know what? He'd already been in show business 34 years by that time. That's the startling thing. Vaudeville, where the young comedian got his start, was closer to early TV than early TV is to us. Men and women who had played the circuits, living out of trunks and traveling by train, brought a whole ethic of live entertainment and hard work and greasepaint and slapstick and being funny to those early days of the tube.
FEATURES
March 29, 2002
Milton Berle earned his nickname - "The Thief of Bad Gags" - through such one-liners as these, from his book, Milton Berle's Private Joke File. "I'm so henpecked I cackle in my sleep! Marriage is one of the few institutions that allow a man to do as his wife pleases. Last month I put in a rock garden. Two of them were dead in the morning!"
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 29, 2002
Wednesday night, after reporting and writing my obituary of Milton Berle, I sat down with a stack of cassettes of Texaco Star Theater shows that I had been allowed to copy from various university archives over the years. As I had done with Carroll O'Connor, Steve Allen and several other television pioneers who have passed away in recent years, I let the flickering images of Berle wash over me in that darkened room until I found one that I could freeze-frame in memory, say goodbye to and move on with my life.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 28, 2002
Milton Berle, television's first superstar and the man who came to be known as "Mr. Television," died at his home yesterday afternoon at the age of 93. With Mr. Berle at the time of his death were his wife, Lorna, and other family members, according to longtime Berle publicist Warren Cowan. The performer was diagnosed with colon cancer last year and had been in hospice care the past few weeks, according to the Associated Press. Mr. Berle's death, like the birth of his Tuesday-night television variety show in 1948, is a milestone moment in the history of the medium that has come to so dominate American life.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
In the 1940s, a country just introduced to TV spent Friday nights with four snappy service men. "Oh, we're the men from Texaco, we work from Maine to Mexico " Milton Berle would then burst into living rooms wearing a dress.But TV's first superstar didn't completely own Friday nights. Uncle Milty's competition over on CBS was a dignified science show from a Baltimore university, of all places."The Johns Hopkins Science Review" debuted on Dec. 17, 1948, with one camera and zero sponsors. Before Mr. Wizard, long before Bill Nye "The Science Guy," a brainy band of faculty conducted scientific experiments live on national television.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | November 17, 1994
You wonder why people are so disillusioned, why so many have taken to downing fistfuls of Prozac like they're Tic-Tacs, and then you see this: Milton Berle has a new exercise video.I thought the whole medium had pretty much scraped rock bottom when Zsa Zsa Gabor released her fitness tape ("Work Out With the Glamorous Zsa Zsa!") a while back.At the time, Zsa Zsa was hardly in, ahem, tip-top physical condition. In fact, in her blue and white jumpsuit, she had the same sleek look as an offensive lineman for the Dallas Cowboys.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 15, 1994
The offering that's the most enjoyable tonight is of interest primarily to fans of vintage TV -- and it's a very rare and old vintage. Arts & Entertainment's "Biography" series spends an hour explaining and presenting the career of "Milton Berle," with kinescopes featuring everyone from Frank Sinatra to Harpo Marx.* "One on One With Magic Johnson" (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Remember when Whoopi Goldberg had her own talk show? I do, because one of the guests her first week was Ted Danson, and I was puzzled at the time about why she would schedule him in such a prominent slot.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | November 17, 1994
You wonder why people are so disillusioned, why so many have taken to downing fistfuls of Prozac like they're Tic-Tacs, and then you see this: Milton Berle has a new exercise video.I thought the whole medium had pretty much scraped rock bottom when Zsa Zsa Gabor released her fitness tape ("Work Out With the Glamorous Zsa Zsa!") a while back.At the time, Zsa Zsa was hardly in, ahem, tip-top physical condition. In fact, in her blue and white jumpsuit, she had the same sleek look as an offensive lineman for the Dallas Cowboys.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 15, 1994
The offering that's the most enjoyable tonight is of interest primarily to fans of vintage TV -- and it's a very rare and old vintage. Arts & Entertainment's "Biography" series spends an hour explaining and presenting the career of "Milton Berle," with kinescopes featuring everyone from Frank Sinatra to Harpo Marx.* "One on One With Magic Johnson" (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Remember when Whoopi Goldberg had her own talk show? I do, because one of the guests her first week was Ted Danson, and I was puzzled at the time about why she would schedule him in such a prominent slot.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 27, 1993
Oh, no! Not another cosmological, metaphorical, eschatological microcosmic/macrocosmic exploration of man's place in the universe and the role that chance and fate play in his life as he tries to escape the eternal patterns that bedevil us all! Not another one of those!But yes, "The Music of Chance," which plays a little as if it were a "Twilight Zone" episode written by David Mamet after immersion in the works of Kahlil Gibran, pulls into the Charles for a two-day run. Philosophy students, parlor existentialists and Mandy Patinkin fans, queue up on the left; all others form up to the right.
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