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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | July 4, 1992
Middle-income people hoping to buy a new house or condominium in Owings Mills New Town, a 5,500-unit development now under construction, will be eligible for help with their down payment and closing costs, probably starting in August.The cash, up to $15,000 per buyer, will come from $300,000 donated by the developers, Ahmanson Developments Inc., and $150,000 in federal block grant money contributed by the Baltimore County government. The County Council is expected to vote its approval of the county contribution Monday night.
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EXPLORE
By Norma Bosley | March 5, 2012
Teachers do not teach for the money; they teach for the love of learning and for making a difference in the life of a child. When one is recognized for excellence, it is an added bonus and a pleasant surprise. Such is the case with Marcella Upshur-Dudley, a science teacher at New Town High School. She was one of 51 educators nationwide to receive an Endeavor Fellowship with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This fellowship will allow her to work on earning a STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics)
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BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,sun reporter | May 18, 2008
The only thing missing from Owings Mills New Town is the lake. Back in the 1980s, the developers' vision for the newly designated growth area in Owings Mills included a man-made lake. When an Army Corps of Engineers study concluded the lake would have a negative environmental impact, not only did it cancel plans for the lake, it also killed the community's original name: Lakeside. However, the central road through the area had already been dedicated, so today New Town residents traverse Lakeside Boulevard to get to their homes and to visit shops.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,sun reporter | May 18, 2008
The only thing missing from Owings Mills New Town is the lake. Back in the 1980s, the developers' vision for the newly designated growth area in Owings Mills included a man-made lake. When an Army Corps of Engineers study concluded the lake would have a negative environmental impact, not only did it cancel plans for the lake, it also killed the community's original name: Lakeside. However, the central road through the area had already been dedicated, so today New Town residents traverse Lakeside Boulevard to get to their homes and to visit shops.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | October 19, 1990
Home sales have at last begun at Owings Mills New Town, the former Lakeside development that nearly was sold at auction two years ago.The 430-acre Baltimore County development is to be built over the next 10 years. It is expected to consist of 5,000 homes, a shopping center, 68,000 square feet of office space and recreational facilities. A large lake for boating also is being proposed, but has not been approved.Yesterday, the project's developers, California-based Ahmanson Developments Inc. and Baltimore-based New Town Development Corp.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | October 10, 1999
When you turn onto Lakeside Boulevard, what you will see is a tree-lined thoroughfare that at day's end is lined with yuppie joggers, making the trek from one end of Owings Mills New Town to the other.But try to follow the road to its namesake and there will be no such luck.Turn onto Groffs Mill Drive -- another main artery that runs through the community -- and the village strip center greets residents with everything the planners said would be there. An athletic club. Restaurant. Grocery store.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | June 1, 1997
Kevin Carney had considered invitations to be one of the builders in Dream Homes -- a public showcase of luxury estates that had great visibility several years ago, but of late has gone on hiatus.But as opulent, imaginative and expensive as the Dream Homes program was in 1994 and 1995 -- only to be squelched by a tough housing market the past two years -- Carney realized it was a concept that had a flaw."They were truly dream homes -- and that was an important role for builders in that price range -- but there really wasn't anything for the bulk of the marketplace," said Carney, president of Thomas Builders Inc. "I talked to several builders about their perception of Dream Homes and they shared the same [thoughts]
BUSINESS
By Daniel H. Barkin and Daniel H. Barkin,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1996
A decade ago, the ambitious blueprints for Owings Mills New Town were unveiled, proclaiming a smaller, Baltimore County version of Columbia or Reston. It would be an "urban village," with as many as 5,000 homes of diverse price tags on 430 acres, the county's largest residential project.Today, nearly 1,200 condominiums, apartments, townhomes and upscale detached dwellings have been built in villages along the tree-lined boulevards that serve as the main arteries. The 304-unit apartment complex in New Town has periodically needed a waiting list at a time when many rental properties in the Baltimore region are running vacancy rates of 5 percent to 10 percent.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1996
1,000th home is sold in Owings Mills New TownOwings Mills New Town, the first and largest planned community in Baltimore County, has recorded its 1,000th home sale. Built by Thomas Builders, the 1,000th home is located in the Persimmon Park community.Founded in late 1990, Owings Mills New Town includes single-family homes, townhouses, condominiums and rental apartments. According to Legg Mason Realty Group, 239 homes were sold in New Town in 1995, an 18 percent increase over 1994. An additional 115 homes have been sold this year.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | May 7, 1991
The developers of Owings Mills New Town have announced plans to build a $20 million, 304-unit apartment complex, the first rental project in the planned 5,000-unit development.Ahmanson Developments Inc., a partner in the team that is developing the entire community, intends to begin construction on the rental complex later this year and complete it by late 1993. It will be called Red Run Apartments.According to the developers, rents will range from about $600 to about $950 per month for the apartment units, which will be in three- and four-story buildings on a 15-acre parcel along Lakeside Boulevard.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 5, 2008
Owings Mills used a double double from Andrew Fitzgerald to defeat visiting New Town, 66-55. Fitzgerald grabbed a game-high 23 rebounds to go with his 15 points and also added seven blocks in the win over the Titans (10-7). The Eagles (14-3) controlled the tempo for much of the game but lost the lead briefly toward the end of the third quarter. Fitzgerald scored six points in the fourth quarter to help Owings Mills regain the lead. St. Paul's 76, Friends 70 -- The Crusaders (11-9) outlasted the Quakers in overtime behind the play of Win Willis (23 points)
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | October 10, 1999
When you turn onto Lakeside Boulevard, what you will see is a tree-lined thoroughfare that at day's end is lined with yuppie joggers, making the trek from one end of Owings Mills New Town to the other.But try to follow the road to its namesake and there will be no such luck.Turn onto Groffs Mill Drive -- another main artery that runs through the community -- and the village strip center greets residents with everything the planners said would be there. An athletic club. Restaurant. Grocery store.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
A few years from now, Gabrielle Ellerbee will be old enough to walk to New Town Elementary School, Baltimore County's latest school construction project.Yesterday, however, the 6-week-old slept under the shade of her denim stroller, oblivious to politicians and developers attending a groundbreaking at the school site on New Town Boulevard in Owings Mills New Town."We just bought a house here in November and we wanted a good school for our children," said Cindy Ellerbee, 32, Gabrielle's mother.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | June 1, 1997
Kevin Carney had considered invitations to be one of the builders in Dream Homes -- a public showcase of luxury estates that had great visibility several years ago, but of late has gone on hiatus.But as opulent, imaginative and expensive as the Dream Homes program was in 1994 and 1995 -- only to be squelched by a tough housing market the past two years -- Carney realized it was a concept that had a flaw."They were truly dream homes -- and that was an important role for builders in that price range -- but there really wasn't anything for the bulk of the marketplace," said Carney, president of Thomas Builders Inc. "I talked to several builders about their perception of Dream Homes and they shared the same [thoughts]
BUSINESS
December 22, 1996
Pre-construction salesHollingtonTrafalgar House Residential Maryland has begun pre-construction sales at Hollington at Owings Mills New Town, where the firm is building 135 condominiums, some with built-in, direct access one-car garages.Gas heat, stove and hot water are standard in the Baltimore County community.At 1,300 square feet, the Copeland is the largest and most expensive ($105,990) of the three-floor plans.First- and second-floor Copelands have garages, however, those the third floor do not.To the right of the entry foyer, there is an L-shaped kitchen with a pantry and laundry area, a full bath and a 9-by-13-foot bedroom.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1996
1,000th home is sold in Owings Mills New TownOwings Mills New Town, the first and largest planned community in Baltimore County, has recorded its 1,000th home sale. Built by Thomas Builders, the 1,000th home is located in the Persimmon Park community.Founded in late 1990, Owings Mills New Town includes single-family homes, townhouses, condominiums and rental apartments. According to Legg Mason Realty Group, 239 homes were sold in New Town in 1995, an 18 percent increase over 1994. An additional 115 homes have been sold this year.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
A few years from now, Gabrielle Ellerbee will be old enough to walk to New Town Elementary School, Baltimore County's latest school construction project.Yesterday, however, the 6-week-old slept under the shade of her denim stroller, oblivious to politicians and developers attending a groundbreaking at the school site on New Town Boulevard in Owings Mills New Town."We just bought a house here in November and we wanted a good school for our children," said Cindy Ellerbee, 32, Gabrielle's mother.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts B | June 28, 1991
The developers of Owings Mills New Town announced yesterday that BTR Realty Inc. will build a 125,000-square-foot shopping center there and that Giant Food Inc. will be the anchor tenant.Planned for a 12.5-acre parcel at Lakeside Boulevard and Groffs Mill Drive, the shopping center is the first commercial venture announced for the 5,000-unit development.Founded in 1947, Linthicum-based BTR has developed and managed office and industrial space as well as shopping centers. Its largest retail project is the 500,000-square-foot Harford Mall in Bel Air. BTR officials indicated to shareholders last month that the company may cut back on development and focus on acquiring and managing existing properties, but they did not rule out some new construction.
BUSINESS
By Daniel H. Barkin and Daniel H. Barkin,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1996
A decade ago, the ambitious blueprints for Owings Mills New Town were unveiled, proclaiming a smaller, Baltimore County version of Columbia or Reston. It would be an "urban village," with as many as 5,000 homes of diverse price tags on 430 acres, the county's largest residential project.Today, nearly 1,200 condominiums, apartments, townhomes and upscale detached dwellings have been built in villages along the tree-lined boulevards that serve as the main arteries. The 304-unit apartment complex in New Town has periodically needed a waiting list at a time when many rental properties in the Baltimore region are running vacancy rates of 5 percent to 10 percent.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1993
Pointers Run1. Thousands of prospective homebuyers and lookers attended the grand opening of the Pointers Run Neighborhood in the Columbia Village of River Hill last weekend.With 13 houses ready for viewing, Pointers Run is the largest model home park in the region, according to David E. Forester, vice president and senior development director for the Rouse Co., Columbia's developer.On Summer Sunrise Drive east of Trotter Road, the models are open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.Only single-family homes will be built in Pointers Run, which borders the 1,000-acre Patuxent Environmental Area.
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