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By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1996
Johns Hopkins sophomore goalkeeper Keith Millman has gone from being injured to indispensable. From a player who coach Matt Smith had almost counted out, to one being counted upon to help lead the Blue Jays to the Centennial Conference men's soccer championship, and beyond.Millman has posted six shutouts in 10 games, including last Monday's 3-0 win over Catholic, when the Blue Jays were without leading scorer Peter Quin (10 goals, two assists) because of illness. Millman hasn't surrendered a goal since Sept.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
Bank of America said Wednesday that an executive with 31 years at the company will step up as president of the institution's Baltimore and Maryland markets. David Millman's past positions at Bank of America include leadership roles in consumer banking and global commercial banking. He's replacing William Couper, the company's mid-Atlantic president, who plans to retire at the end of September after 40 years with Bank of America. Millman, born in Baltimore, lives in Owings Mills with wife Holly.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | June 27, 2009
Gerald "Captain Jerry" Millman, a former used-car dealer and haberdasher who founded Captain Jerry's Custom T-shirts, died Sunday of kidney and heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 82. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Millman was raised in the city's Pimlico neighborhood. After graduating from Forest Park High School, he served in the North Atlantic aboard the Coast Guard cutter Dexter. After being discharged from the service, he established a used-car business in Brooklyn at Patapsco Avenue and Potee Street.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | June 27, 2009
Gerald "Captain Jerry" Millman, a former used-car dealer and haberdasher who founded Captain Jerry's Custom T-shirts, died Sunday of kidney and heart failure at Sinai Hospital. He was 82. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Millman was raised in the city's Pimlico neighborhood. After graduating from Forest Park High School, he served in the North Atlantic aboard the Coast Guard cutter Dexter. After being discharged from the service, he established a used-car business in Brooklyn at Patapsco Avenue and Potee Street.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2000
Onetime grocery giant Jack I. Millman, now 75 and wracked by years of legal and financial troubles, was sentenced yesterday to two years in prison and ordered to pay $750,000 in fines and restitution for masterminding an extensive coupon-clipping fraud that brought him and his family millions. Millman, charged in 1998, pleaded guilty in December to one count of mail fraud. His attorneys argued that the former co-owner of the now-defunct Farm Fresh supermarket chain should serve any sentence under home incarceration because of his age and various health problems.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1995
Michael D. Sullivan, former president of Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc., has bought a major ownership interest in and signed on as chairman of a fledgling hair-replacement business based in Montgomery County.The company is Waye Laboratories Inc., described in advertisements as offering "non-surgical hair reconstruction." Using the name Waye Images, the company has one office in Rockville, an employee said.But it plans to grow. Waye intends to open offices in many states and challenge Hair Club For Men and other hair-restoration companies, said Mark Millman, one of Mr. Sullivan's friends and president of Millman Search Group Inc.Mr.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
It wasn't the typical way to make $2.4 million: clipping and redeeming tens of thousands of price-chopping coupons that knock 50 cents off a loaf of bread or $1 off a box of detergent.But according to FBI and IRS agents, that's how the president of a once-thriving Maryland supermarket chain illegally made part of his fortune.An indictment filed this week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore charges Jack I. Millman with redeeming coupons that customers never turned in. The indictment alleges he paid people to clip coupons for dozens of products and turned them in himself, claiming that people had bought the items at one of his 10 Farm Fresh stores.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff Writer | May 31, 1995
When Mark Millman quit his $40,000-a-year personnel-manager job to become a consultant, he warned his family to expect some lean times. It was 1982. The economy was bad. And he had no business lined up.On a Monday, he started work in his basement. On Tuesday, he landed a $25,000-a-year, human-resources consulting job. Within a month he had another contract, for $20,000. Within a year, he had $100,000 in work."People used to say, 'How did you start a business in a recession?' " Mr. Millman observed recently.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
County Seat Stores Inc., which is in Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, is expected to close its Rosedale distribution center next month and has begun laying off its 160 workers, according to a former consultant for the company.The New York-based youth apparel chain relocated its national distribution center to Baltimore County from Minnesota in June to be closer to most of its 400 stores -- including 25 in Maryland.But the retailer has been beset with "severe liquidity problems," according to Executive Vice President Brett Forman, that landed it in Chapter 11 in January, two years after emerging from bankruptcy protection while under other management.
NEWS
August 4, 1994
Daniel Boone DuganInsurance executiveDaniel Boone Dugan, a retired insurance executive, died Saturday of pneumonia at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 85.He retired in 1980 as president of the insurance firm of Bland, Dugan & McMillan, which he had established in the early 1930s. The business was later acquired by Stump, Harvey & Cook.Earlier, he had worked on Wall Street from 1927 to 1932, learning the brokerage business before returning to Baltimore.Born and reared in Baltimore, he was descended from a family that included Charles Carroll of Carrollton and Archbishop John Carroll, the nation's first Roman Catholic bishop.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2000
Onetime grocery giant Jack I. Millman, now 75 and wracked by years of legal and financial troubles, was sentenced yesterday to two years in prison and ordered to pay $750,000 in fines and restitution for masterminding an extensive coupon-clipping fraud that brought him and his family millions. Millman, charged in 1998, pleaded guilty in December to one count of mail fraud. His attorneys argued that the former co-owner of the now-defunct Farm Fresh supermarket chain should serve any sentence under home incarceration because of his age and various health problems.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1999
It hardly seems promising: heading an ailing national chain of home improvement stores that's losing money and customers, closing stores, struggling through bankruptcy and taking a beating from the competition.But the new executive officer who took charge of Hechinger Co. on Tuesday is likely to find the job a no-lose proposition regardless of what happens to the chain, turnaround specialists and consultants say.If Richard J. Lynch Jr. succeeds in resurrecting the chain from bankruptcy and shoring it up financially, he'll be hailed as a marketing genius.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
County Seat Stores Inc., which is in Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, is expected to close its Rosedale distribution center next month and has begun laying off its 160 workers, according to a former consultant for the company.The New York-based youth apparel chain relocated its national distribution center to Baltimore County from Minnesota in June to be closer to most of its 400 stores -- including 25 in Maryland.But the retailer has been beset with "severe liquidity problems," according to Executive Vice President Brett Forman, that landed it in Chapter 11 in January, two years after emerging from bankruptcy protection while under other management.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1998
A former manager in the now-defunct Farm Fresh supermarket chain pleaded guilty yesterday for his part in a scheme that defrauded national food companies of $2.4 million by submitting tens of thousands of "misredeemed" price-chopping coupons.Kenneth Goldscher, 47, of Owings Mills pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to tax evasion and interstate transportation of stolen property. He admitted in a statement of facts presented in court to receiving $185,890 in cash from the misredeemed coupons.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
It wasn't the typical way to make $2.4 million: clipping and redeeming tens of thousands of price-chopping coupons that knock 50 cents off a loaf of bread or $1 off a box of detergent.But according to FBI and IRS agents, that's how the president of a once-thriving Maryland supermarket chain illegally made part of his fortune.An indictment filed this week in U.S. District Court in Baltimore charges Jack I. Millman with redeeming coupons that customers never turned in. The indictment alleges he paid people to clip coupons for dozens of products and turned them in himself, claiming that people had bought the items at one of his 10 Farm Fresh stores.
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1996
Johns Hopkins sophomore goalkeeper Keith Millman has gone from being injured to indispensable. From a player who coach Matt Smith had almost counted out, to one being counted upon to help lead the Blue Jays to the Centennial Conference men's soccer championship, and beyond.Millman has posted six shutouts in 10 games, including last Monday's 3-0 win over Catholic, when the Blue Jays were without leading scorer Peter Quin (10 goals, two assists) because of illness. Millman hasn't surrendered a goal since Sept.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1996
Luskin's Inc. has found it hard to be "The Cheapest Guy in Town" when the town is Washington.Fierce competition from other Washington-area retailers has taken away the consumer electronics and appliance chain's price advantage, forcing the Baltimore-based company to shut eight of its 11 outlets in the region.The closings mean Luskin's stores will be concentrated in the Baltimore area, where the company was founded nearly 50 years ago.Cary Luskin, president and son of the company's founder, Jack Luskin, said the closings are not part of any corporate-wide restructuring that will affect its Baltimore operation.
NEWS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1996
On a November day in 1994, Jack Millman, a hulking figure with a shock of white hair and an imperious bearing, strode into the office of Jesse K. Swartz for a meeting that neither man relished.Ignoring their simmering feud, they exchanged pleasantries and moved into an adjoining conference room. Mr. Millman, the founder of Farm Fresh Supermarkets of Maryland Inc., appeared ill at ease. Mr. Swartz never enjoyed these rare encounters either. But as chief financial officer of wholesaler B. Green & Co., a partner in Farm Fresh, he had insisted on this meeting to find out how the Baltimore grocery chain was doing.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Timothy J. Mullaney and Liz Bowie and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
Luskin's Inc., the appliance store that was started by a couple of guys who followed ice trucks around to find out who needed refrigerators and grew into a large regional business, succumbed yesterday to competition from nationwide appliance and electronics retailers.Luskin's announced it had decided to give up after 48 years and close its 12 remaining stores in the Baltimore-Washington area.Once, "The Cheapest Guy in Town" was a household slogan in Baltimore, but the company took a financial tumble after going public in the 1980s, and appeared to be struggling with competition and consumer complaints of false advertising.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1996
Luskin's Inc. has found it hard to be "The Cheapest Guy in Town" when the town is Washington.Fierce competition from other Washington-area retailers has taken away the consumer electronics and appliance chain's price advantage, forcing the Baltimore-based company to shut eight of its 11 outlets in the region.The closings mean Luskin's stores will be concentrated in the Baltimore area, where the company was founded nearly 50 years ago.Cary Luskin, president and son of the company's founder, Jack Luskin, said the closings are not part of any corporate-wide restructuring that will affect its Baltimore operation.
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