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Million Mom March

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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - Carrying homemade signs and photographs of loved ones killed by gunfire, gun control advocates used a Mother's Day rally yesterday to begin a campaign to lobby for renewal of a ban on assault weapons. The rally, the Million Mom March, attracted about 2,500 people, its organizers said. It focused on supporting legislation to renew the 1994 ban on semiautomatic assault rifles, which is to expire in September. The legislation is unlikely to move forward in the Republican-controlled Congress, and gun control advocates hope to make it an election-year issue.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 11, 2013
Kudos to Dan Rodricks and The Sun for your coverage of last month's tragedy involving innocent victims of the proliferation of guns in the U.S. You stepped forward with not only the horrific facts of the Newtown, Conn., school shootings but were unrelenting in your attack on the National Rifle Association and legislators who are determined to keep weapons in the hands every criminally insane young man bent on wreaking havoc in our communities....
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EXPLORE
December 27, 2012
I was the Howard County co-coordinator for the Million Mom March, for sensible hand gun reform, in 2000. I certainly never dreamed I would be back to the same plea, to all, to contact our U.S. senators, our Maryland senators, all our elected officials, to please, act now to stop these unbearable tragedies from guns. It's past time to enact meaningful gun reform. The un-elected NRA cannot hold this much power. Do we really need assault weapons in our homes? Can't that be the first step, to bring back the ban on these military weapons?
EXPLORE
December 27, 2012
I was the Howard County co-coordinator for the Million Mom March, for sensible hand gun reform, in 2000. I certainly never dreamed I would be back to the same plea, to all, to contact our U.S. senators, our Maryland senators, all our elected officials, to please, act now to stop these unbearable tragedies from guns. It's past time to enact meaningful gun reform. The un-elected NRA cannot hold this much power. Do we really need assault weapons in our homes? Can't that be the first step, to bring back the ban on these military weapons?
NEWS
May 13, 2000
IDENTIFYING a problem can be less onerous than fixing it. Take gun control, for instance. Tens of thousands of mothers are expected to march tomorrow in Washington to support two sides of this seemingly intractable issue. Ask the gun-rights advocates or gun-control activists and they'll both say, "Safe children? It's our No. 1 goal." That's where the agreement stops, sadly. And where divisive politics starts, whipping people up over how best to solve the problem. Meanwhile comes the destruction of young lives in large numbers.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | May 16, 2000
IF CHILDREN are going to be safe from handguns, it looks like it will be up to their mothers to make it so. Great. Another item on our list of things to do. Another chore. Another responsibility. One more damn thing we have to do before we can turn in for the night. And one more thing we can't count on the husbands and fathers to do. Like the laundry or the grocery shopping or remembering to make well-baby check-ups. We elected them to Congress and the state legislatures, and we tried to relax our controlling natures and delegate to them the responsibility of gun safety.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | May 28, 2004
CHICAGO - An organization called the Million Mom March held a rally in Washington on Mother's Day to urge a renewal of the 1994 federal assault weapons ban. If you must know, the turnout was about 997,500 short. But the advocates are not easily discouraged. Afterward, they launched a vehicle called the Big Pink Rig on a "Halt the Assault Tour." The bus will crisscross the nation until September, when the ban is scheduled to expire. The 1994 law was a monument to President Bill Clinton's distinctive political genius - which generally involved tiny symbolic changes that pleased particular constituencies without actually having much effect.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 13, 2000
CHANTILLY, Va. -- Melinda Gierisch is under siege. First, CBS needs footage of her at target practice. A conservative Internet site wants to chat about a new pro-gun group. So do two separate French television crews. As she races to meet a deadline at work, her phone won't stop ringing with reporters hoping to talk about why she packs a pistol. All this media, all these deadlines, all this attention. It's stressing her out. She heads for the firing range. "I've got to blow off some steam," she says, before squeezing off a few rounds.
NEWS
January 11, 2013
Kudos to Dan Rodricks and The Sun for your coverage of last month's tragedy involving innocent victims of the proliferation of guns in the U.S. You stepped forward with not only the horrific facts of the Newtown, Conn., school shootings but were unrelenting in your attack on the National Rifle Association and legislators who are determined to keep weapons in the hands every criminally insane young man bent on wreaking havoc in our communities....
TOPIC
By ELLEN GOODMAN | May 7, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Donna Dees-Thomases is breathless. The New Jersey mother of two broke the land-speed record this morning. She went from a dead sleep to a seat on a 5: 30 a.m. train in less than a half-hour. At 9: 00 she's here in the D.C. headquarters of the Million Mom March. I am tempted to tell the founder of this Mother's Day mobilization for gun control to take a deep Lamaze breath. But frankly the office is so, um, pregnant, with maternal images that I pass it up. She is just days from the May 14 due date.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | May 28, 2004
CHICAGO - An organization called the Million Mom March held a rally in Washington on Mother's Day to urge a renewal of the 1994 federal assault weapons ban. If you must know, the turnout was about 997,500 short. But the advocates are not easily discouraged. Afterward, they launched a vehicle called the Big Pink Rig on a "Halt the Assault Tour." The bus will crisscross the nation until September, when the ban is scheduled to expire. The 1994 law was a monument to President Bill Clinton's distinctive political genius - which generally involved tiny symbolic changes that pleased particular constituencies without actually having much effect.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - Carrying homemade signs and photographs of loved ones killed by gunfire, gun control advocates used a Mother's Day rally yesterday to begin a campaign to lobby for renewal of a ban on assault weapons. The rally, the Million Mom March, attracted about 2,500 people, its organizers said. It focused on supporting legislation to renew the 1994 ban on semiautomatic assault rifles, which is to expire in September. The legislation is unlikely to move forward in the Republican-controlled Congress, and gun control advocates hope to make it an election-year issue.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | May 16, 2000
IF CHILDREN are going to be safe from handguns, it looks like it will be up to their mothers to make it so. Great. Another item on our list of things to do. Another chore. Another responsibility. One more damn thing we have to do before we can turn in for the night. And one more thing we can't count on the husbands and fathers to do. Like the laundry or the grocery shopping or remembering to make well-baby check-ups. We elected them to Congress and the state legislatures, and we tried to relax our controlling natures and delegate to them the responsibility of gun safety.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2000
WASHINGTON - Saying there is no political force more powerful than a mother's wrath, hundreds of thousands of mothers made an emotional call yesterday for tighter gun laws to help protect their children. At times with rage and tears, the mothers promised that this event would be more than a one-day outcry on a sunny Mother's Day afternoon. They pledged to build a grass-roots movement for tough new gun laws that would continue its work in their hometowns and at the polls. "It does my heart good to look out and see all these people -- all with the same goal, all with so much voting power," said Maisha Enaharo, 48, a mother from Rochester, N.Y., as she stared into a sea of signs and strollers.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 13, 2000
CHANTILLY, Va. -- Melinda Gierisch is under siege. First, CBS needs footage of her at target practice. A conservative Internet site wants to chat about a new pro-gun group. So do two separate French television crews. As she races to meet a deadline at work, her phone won't stop ringing with reporters hoping to talk about why she packs a pistol. All this media, all these deadlines, all this attention. It's stressing her out. She heads for the firing range. "I've got to blow off some steam," she says, before squeezing off a few rounds.
NEWS
May 13, 2000
IDENTIFYING a problem can be less onerous than fixing it. Take gun control, for instance. Tens of thousands of mothers are expected to march tomorrow in Washington to support two sides of this seemingly intractable issue. Ask the gun-rights advocates or gun-control activists and they'll both say, "Safe children? It's our No. 1 goal." That's where the agreement stops, sadly. And where divisive politics starts, whipping people up over how best to solve the problem. Meanwhile comes the destruction of young lives in large numbers.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
Neighbors of the well-liked, sunny Ellicott City boy who was killed in an accidental shooting last week are rallying to prevent a similar tragedy. Many residents plan to attend a Mother's Day gun-safety march in honor of 13-year-old Tanun "Byrd" Wichainaraphong, and they're lobbying the school board to implement gun-safety education in all grades. "As a community, we have to pull together and do something about these incredibly wasteful deaths," said Mary Catherine Cochran, a neighbor of Byrd's who is helping to organize the efforts.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2000
WASHINGTON - Saying there is no political force more powerful than a mother's wrath, hundreds of thousands of mothers made an emotional call yesterday for tighter gun laws to help protect their children. At times with rage and tears, the mothers promised that this event would be more than a one-day outcry on a sunny Mother's Day afternoon. They pledged to build a grass-roots movement for tough new gun laws that would continue its work in their hometowns and at the polls. "It does my heart good to look out and see all these people -- all with the same goal, all with so much voting power," said Maisha Enaharo, 48, a mother from Rochester, N.Y., as she stared into a sea of signs and strollers.
TOPIC
By ELLEN GOODMAN | May 7, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Donna Dees-Thomases is breathless. The New Jersey mother of two broke the land-speed record this morning. She went from a dead sleep to a seat on a 5: 30 a.m. train in less than a half-hour. At 9: 00 she's here in the D.C. headquarters of the Million Mom March. I am tempted to tell the founder of this Mother's Day mobilization for gun control to take a deep Lamaze breath. But frankly the office is so, um, pregnant, with maternal images that I pass it up. She is just days from the May 14 due date.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2000
Neighbors of the well-liked, sunny Ellicott City boy who was killed in an accidental shooting last week are rallying to prevent a similar tragedy. Many residents plan to attend a Mother's Day gun-safety march in honor of 13-year-old Tanun "Byrd" Wichainaraphong, and they're lobbying the school board to implement gun-safety education in all grades. "As a community, we have to pull together and do something about these incredibly wasteful deaths," said Mary Catherine Cochran, a neighbor of Byrd's who is helping to organize the efforts.
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