Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMillion Man March
IN THE NEWS

Million Man March

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | October 12, 2005
The Million Man March of 1995 has not yet achieved the mythic aura of the "I Have a Dream" speech of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. But it has become a modern landmark for African-American men, symbolizing a rededication to home, family and moral values. Clips from a new documentary being made to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Oct. 16, 1995, Washington march will be shown tonight at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture. An anniversary march, the Millions More Movement, will be held this weekend in Washington.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 26, 2014
One only has to take a look at the story about the death of 14-year-old Najee Thomas in Cherry Hill and have lived in the inner city to understand the circumstances ( "In Cherry Hill, shooting takes a good friend's life," April 23). Reporter Justin George could have delved further into the history of Cherry Hill which, by the way, is nothing like its name. Predominantly African-American, the community has a long history of drugs, violence and an unstable home environment. What can we expect from generations after generation of people raised by single parents (if lucky)
Advertisement
NEWS
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
On Oct. 16, 1995, hundreds of thousands of African-American men from around the nation poured into Washington, D.C., in search of spiritual renewal and fraternal strength. As they stood together on the Mall, basking in the autumn sun, the men of the Million Man March pledged to take responsibility for their actions, to serve their families and their communities, and to improve themselves and the world in which they lived. Kurt Schmoke, then mayor of Baltimore, brought his 24-year-old stepson.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
I could not get an exact count, but I am satisfied there was a turnout exceeding 500 men at the "300 Man March" against city violence ("Baltimore men take to streets to stem violence," July 6). Our ladies were present as well serving water at predesignated locations. I was physically unable to walk due to a recent health issue, but I drove my vehicle and was as helpful as one could be. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake spoke compassionately, and Commissioner Anthony Batts was stern.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 16, 1996
"Get on the Bus" is all vehicle: It's that hoariest of old story-forms, the platoon-level war movie, about a slice of life gathered into an artificial group for a certain mission; it chronicles how they bicker and clamor, but eventually become a cohesive unit. It's even got the scene where someone dies and his last prayer is discovered and read to the assembled men who bow their heads in weepy gratitude.The war, however, isn't the one against Hitler, but the other one -- the one African-Americans have been fighting for a number of centuries in hopes of acquiring the dignity, equality and prosperity in equal proportions to the sweat, blood and pain they have invested in this country.
NEWS
October 9, 1997
LIKE THE MILLION MAN MARCH that preceded it, the greatest impact of Saturday's Promise Keepers rally in Washington will occur with individual acts of goodness. Life-changing experiences motivated hundreds of thousands of men to attend the Christian event; others found spiritual awakening while there. Families and communities will be better if these men fulfill their professed commitment to be more responsible.If there is any group action of lasting relevance, it may be political. Promise Keepers' leaders insist politics has never been a motivation for the 62 all-male rallies they have held since 1990.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
Mark Hughes was a sixth-grade teacher at Lombard Middle School in 1995, watching the Million Man March on CNN with his pupils. Hughes resolved that if a similar event were to happen, he would be there in person. On Monday, he will get his chance. The Million Family March, which Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan and other organizers have said will be a more inclusive successor to the Million Man March, will take place on the National Mall amid busloads of visitors (local organizers estimate 250,000 will travel from Baltimore)
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Norris P. West contributed to this article | November 17, 1995
Anne Arundel County residents who attended the Million Man March last month are taking their first steps to uphold the pledges they made on The Mall in Washington.The marchers have scheduled a summit at Mount Moriah A.M.E. Church in Annapolis from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. tomorrow to discuss ways to help rebuild the black community. It is the first event sponsored by the Anne Arundel County African American Unity Coalition, a group of about 20 black churches, businesses and civic groups formed after the march.
NEWS
April 12, 2006
Using a classic American tactic, immigrants have been demonstrating across the country, seeking changes in law and policy. They've been coming out by the tens of thousands - last week and again Monday - in cities such as Washington, New York, Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Los Angeles and Phoenix. And they are forcing local and national politicians as well as their constituents to sit up and take notice, while Congress struggles to come to some agreement on meaningful immigration reform. Some organizers of the recent demonstrations are comparing their efforts to the civil rights struggle and the pivotal 1963 March on Washington.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
I could not get an exact count, but I am satisfied there was a turnout exceeding 500 men at the "300 Man March" against city violence ("Baltimore men take to streets to stem violence," July 6). Our ladies were present as well serving water at predesignated locations. I was physically unable to walk due to a recent health issue, but I drove my vehicle and was as helpful as one could be. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake spoke compassionately, and Commissioner Anthony Batts was stern.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
On a day when at least four people were shot in Baltimore before dinner time - two of them fatally - hundreds of city men took to the streets in a planned 10-mile march along North Avenue, shutting down portions of the thoroughfare, to protest the recent spike in gun violence. "There's a war going on in our streets" that "starts and ends with our young black men," City Councilman Brandon Scott told the crowd, which included the mayor and police commissioner. "We're going to take our city back.
NEWS
April 12, 2006
Using a classic American tactic, immigrants have been demonstrating across the country, seeking changes in law and policy. They've been coming out by the tens of thousands - last week and again Monday - in cities such as Washington, New York, Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, Los Angeles and Phoenix. And they are forcing local and national politicians as well as their constituents to sit up and take notice, while Congress struggles to come to some agreement on meaningful immigration reform. Some organizers of the recent demonstrations are comparing their efforts to the civil rights struggle and the pivotal 1963 March on Washington.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | October 15, 2005
When participants gather today on the Washington Mall for the sequel to the 1995 Million Man March, they intend not only to mark the historic occasion, but to emerge with a national agenda on such issues as crime, education and health care. A decade ago, the gathering of African-American men ignited a spirit of unity among participants. But when Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan convenes the Millions More Movement, bringing people together won't be the only objective. He will push for action.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | October 12, 2005
The Million Man March of 1995 has not yet achieved the mythic aura of the "I Have a Dream" speech of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. But it has become a modern landmark for African-American men, symbolizing a rededication to home, family and moral values. Clips from a new documentary being made to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Oct. 16, 1995, Washington march will be shown tonight at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture. An anniversary march, the Millions More Movement, will be held this weekend in Washington.
NEWS
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
On Oct. 16, 1995, hundreds of thousands of African-American men from around the nation poured into Washington, D.C., in search of spiritual renewal and fraternal strength. As they stood together on the Mall, basking in the autumn sun, the men of the Million Man March pledged to take responsibility for their actions, to serve their families and their communities, and to improve themselves and the world in which they lived. Kurt Schmoke, then mayor of Baltimore, brought his 24-year-old stepson.
NEWS
By Luke Tracy and Luke Tracy,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2003
Ayinde Jean-Baptiste, who gained notice at age 12 for his speech at the Million Man March in Washington, spoke last night on the continuing legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Anne Arundel County NAACP's 15th annual awards dinner in Linthicum. "Truth isn't always easy or beautiful to hear," Jean-Baptiste told a crowd of about 1,200 before elaborating on continuing problems across the United States and the world. He said King advocated more than just tolerance. In keeping with King's legacy, he encouraged people to think globally, including speaking out for the rights of Palestinians and urging caution in dealing with Iraq.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 2000
WASHINGTON - Hundreds of thousands of men, women and children gathered at the National Mall yesterday to celebrate family unity and racial and religious harmony in a Million Family March organized by Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam. Spread from the U.S. Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial, families listened as Farrakhan delivered a rambling three-hour speech that touched on a variety of issues but mostly sounded a theme of the importance of family. "The family is the basic unit of civilization," Farrakhan told the crowd.
NEWS
April 26, 2014
One only has to take a look at the story about the death of 14-year-old Najee Thomas in Cherry Hill and have lived in the inner city to understand the circumstances ( "In Cherry Hill, shooting takes a good friend's life," April 23). Reporter Justin George could have delved further into the history of Cherry Hill which, by the way, is nothing like its name. Predominantly African-American, the community has a long history of drugs, violence and an unstable home environment. What can we expect from generations after generation of people raised by single parents (if lucky)
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 2000
WASHINGTON - Hundreds of thousands of men, women and children gathered at the National Mall yesterday to celebrate family unity and racial and religious harmony in a Million Family March organized by Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam. Spread from the U.S. Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial, families listened as Farrakhan delivered a rambling three-hour speech that touched on a variety of issues but mostly sounded a theme of the importance of family. "The family is the basic unit of civilization," Farrakhan told the crowd.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
Mark Hughes was a sixth-grade teacher at Lombard Middle School in 1995, watching the Million Man March on CNN with his pupils. Hughes resolved that if a similar event were to happen, he would be there in person. On Monday, he will get his chance. The Million Family March, which Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan and other organizers have said will be a more inclusive successor to the Million Man March, will take place on the National Mall amid busloads of visitors (local organizers estimate 250,000 will travel from Baltimore)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.