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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1998
To augment the water supply in Carroll's most populous area, the county will develop a series of wells at Springfield Hospital Center that could deliver 1 million gallons a day to customers.In an agreement signed by the state Board of Public Works last week, the county also said it would continue supplying the hospital and other nearby state properties with as much water as needed now and into the future.New water sources must be found to serve the county's most populous area of 28,000 residents and growing.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Baltimore city officials belatedly disclosed Friday that sewage overflows topped 12 million gallons during last week's downpour, four times what had previously been acknowledged. It was the most untreated waste reported spilled in the city in a single day since 2006, according to state records. Top managers of the city Department of Public Works just learned Friday of three previously unreported overflows during the Aug. 12 rainstorm, according to department spokesman Jeffrey Raymond.
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2003
The discovery yesterday morning of a second clogged line in a sewer pipe in Herring Run - about 1,000 feet upstream from where a blockage has dumped millions of gallons of raw sewage into the stream this week - has exacerbated one of the worst spills in Baltimore history. Crews will likely work through the weekend to attack the stubborn overflow, which is dumping about 2 million gallons of sewage a day into the stream, said Kurt Kocher, spokesman for the Department of Public Works. On Monday, a passer-by discovered the first backup, in a 36-inch-wide trunk line under the Harford Road bridge in Herring Run. But it appears that the spill may have started a week ago, when a resident noticed it but failed to alert watershed authorities.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
More than three million gallons of raw but diluted sewage spilled into the Patapsco River and Jones Falls during and after Tuesday's near-record downpour, city officials reported Friday. An overflow at the Patapsco Wastewater Treatment Plant in Wagner's Point dumped about three million gallons into the river before it was stopped after nearly five hours, the Department of Public Works said. Another overflow at a pumping station at Patapsco Avenue and Shell Road, less than a half mile away, spilled 170,300 gallons of untreated sewage into the river before it was halted early Thursday, the department said.
NEWS
By Andrew C. Revkin and Andrew C. Revkin,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 7, 2002
NEWBURGH, N.Y. - All along the East Coast, persistent drought has shriveled streams like never before. But tucked in the woods 70 miles north of New York City, a circular pool of fresh, clear water spills into a sparkling brook that runs downhill to the Hudson River. No matter how dry the weather, gauges measure a flow of between 4 million and 6 million gallons a day. No one is thrilled, however. The sinkhole and half a dozen other springs and wet spots nearby are fed by leaks 600 feet underground in one of the most important water tunnels in the world, the 85-mile Delaware Aqueduct.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2002
A sewage leak that began at a Perry Hall pumping station Sunday afternoon was halted yesterday, but not before 6 million gallons of raw effluent poured into Gunpowder Falls and forced officials to warn against fishing and boating on a stretch of Baltimore County's most scenic river. Any fish caught in the waters between Perry Hall and the Bird River since Sunday should be thrown away, officials said. The county also has posted signs along Gunpowder Falls warning against contact with the water until further notice.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2001
SUNBURY, Pa. -- The tri-state agency that oversees the Susquehanna River approved an agreement yesterday that allows Baltimore City to withdraw up to 250 million gallons a day from the river to satisfy the metropolitan region's growing thirst. In return, the city acknowledged that the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, which represents New York, Pennsylvania and Maryland, has jurisdiction over the use of the river, and the city will withdraw its legal challenge of that authority. The city Board of Estimates is expected to approve the agreement in September.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs, Jamie Stiehm and Laurie Willis and Johnathon E. Briggs, Jamie Stiehm and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2003
City workers struggled last night to contain a huge overflow that has sent at least 30 million gallons of raw sewage pouring into Herring Run in Northeast Baltimore, the result of a blockage in a 3-foot-wide pipe. Health warnings were posted yesterday along parts of a 6-mile stretch of the waterway, which flows into the Back River near Essex. "This may be the biggest one in my 10 years," Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, the city health commissioner, said of the spill -- enough to fill 45 public swimming pools.
NEWS
July 7, 1999
Water conservation during the second holiday weekend of the summer placed less stress than the first for the treatment plant in South Carroll, officials said yesterday.Although demand reached the plant daily capacity of 3 million gallons Monday, that was the largest amount processed since restrictions on outdoor use began June 1. Overall use fell in the past 30 days by about 300,000 gallons a day."The plant is operating at manageable levels, and it's in good shape," said Gary Horst, county director of enterprise and recreation services, in a meeting with the county commissioners yesterday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1999
Residents of Carroll's most populated area are using more than a million gallons of water less a day this month than in May, county officials said yesterday.In South Carroll, home to about 28,000 people, water use dropped from a record daily high of nearly 3.5 million gallons in May to 2.2 million gallons a day for the first 22 days of August.The county banned all outdoor water use in South Carroll on June 1, and modified the ban 15 days later to outdoor use on alternating days."I think people are taking the water crisis seriously," said Gary Horst, county director of enterprise and recreation services.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Hurricane Sandy's rains caused 84 million gallons to run off into Maryland bodies of water, according to a report by research organization Climate Central. In New York and New Jersey, meanwhile, more than 5 billion gallons of sewage spills are estimated to have occurred. The District of Columbia also had more spillage than Maryland, with 475 million gallons from a single pumping station. Nearly half of Maryland's estimated total came from sewage overflows related to heavy precipitation.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
A broken sewer line in Catonsville that went undetected for three weeks after the storm called Sandy passed through the area poured nearly 1.3 million gallons of raw waste into a tributary of the Patapsco River, Baltimore County officials reported Wednesday. County workers discovered the spill Tuesday on the grounds of Spring Grove Hospital Center after a neighboring resident complained about sewage odors to the Maryland Department of the Environment, which relayed the information, according to David Fidler, spokesman for the county's Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
Millions of gallons of raw sewage were overflowing into the Little Patuxent River in Howard County late Monday and early Tuesday morning after two separate electrical feeds were cut off at the Little Patuxent Water Reclamation Plant, according to county officials. Officials were not sure when the overflow would be stopped. The plant, about a half-mile east of the intersection of Route 1 and Route 32 at 8900 Greenwood Place in Savage, serves the central part of Howard County. Power was knocked out to the first 32,000-volt electrical feeder amid high winds and rain in the region because of superstorm Sandy about 8:30 or 9 p.m., and to the second at 11 p.m., said Stephen Gerwin, the county's utilities bureau chief.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
A blockage in a 12-inch sewer main caused 1.16 million gallons of sewage to overflow into a tributary of Herring Run, according to a statement Wednesday by the Baltimore County Department of Public Works. The sewer line is in the Anneslie-Idlewylde area near the border of Baltimore and Baltimore County, DPW said. The overflow occurred Oct. 12 but was not discovered until Tuesday after an odor complaint was investigated, according to the statement. The line was cleared around 6 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar | September 8, 2011
A large volume of sewage, which could be approaching 1 million gallons, spilled into a Southeast Baltimore creek throughout Thursday, said a Department of Public Works official. The overflow started about 8 a.m., coming from a pipe that leads to an underground vault in the 2200 block of Broening Highway and flowing into Colgate Creek, said DPW spokeswoman Celeste Amato. Public Works is working to re-route the sewage flow until the spillage stops, she said. When flow levels decrease enough, the department will be able to diagnose the cause of the overflow and provide a final estimate of the total spill volume.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
An estimated 2.4 million gallons of sewage overflowed Sunday afternoon into the Back River in Essex, the Department of Public Works said Tuesday in a statement. The waterfront at Rocky Point, Cox's Point and Edgemere Park was posted with overflow notices by Baltimore County. The overflow, largely attributable to heavy rainfall, lasted from about 12:20 p.m. until about 2:00 p.m. A large volume of rain water in the sewer lines increased beyond normal levels the amount of sewage coming into the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant in Baltimore County, according to the department.
NEWS
July 21, 1991
Mayor W. Benjamin Brown again pleaded with city residents Friday to conserve water because of the drought.Residents seem to have not heeded the City Council's request two weeks ago to stop water usage outside, Brown said."
EXPLORE
By Staff Reports | August 16, 2011
The Baltimore City Department of Public Works said Tuesday that an estimated 2.4 million gallons of sewer overflow spilled into the Back River in Baltimore County on Sunday, Aug. 14, emanating from the Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant inEssex. Officials of the city public works department - which operates the treatment plant - said in a release that the spill lasted from about 12:20 to 2 p.m. Officials said the cause of the spill is mostly attributable to the heavy rainfall, much of which infiltrated sewer lines resulting in inflow at the facility above normal levels.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 29, 2007
The water supply in Harford has yet to be affected by the drought as significantly as other jurisdictions in Maryland, but county officials are anxiously watching the at-risk sources and urging residents to take conservation measures. There are no restrictions on water use in Harford, as have been implemented in other areas in the region, but that could change if the dry conditions persist, county officials said. "We are asking people to be mindful of dry conditions and to conserve wherever possible," said Joel Caudill, deputy director of the county's Public Works Department.
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