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By David Kohn | April 9, 2009
From the 1960s to the 1980s, child mortality dropped drastically in the world's poorest regions. Vaccination, sanitation, health education and improved medical care saved millions of children. Most experts expected this success to continue automatically. It hasn't. Over the past two decades, child mortality has flat-lined; in some places, it's risen. Take Chad. There, a child has an astounding 1-in-5 chance of dying before age 5. That hasn't changed in two decades. In the U.S., an infant's risk of dying is less than 1 in 100. "The world started a revolution in child health but didn't finish it," says Johns Hopkins University researcher Jennifer Bryce, a leading child health expert.
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HEALTH
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2011
The woman, a Nigerian mother named Busayo, fought back tears as she recalled going into debt in a futile attempt to treat her infant son's pneumonia. After Busayo spent all of her family's savings — she even sold the family cell phone — the 2-month-old died. Speaking just above a whisper, the woman was sitting in a small rural church in Nigeria talking with Dr. Orin Levine, who was being featured in the British documentary "Kill or Cure?" "That really stuck with me," said Levine, the 44-year-old executive director of the International Vaccine Access Center (IVAC)
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NEWS
June 23, 1995
Development officials have a term for the crises that drain dollars, energy and attention from their work in desperately poor areas of the world. "The tyranny of the urgent," they call it, as millions are channeled into emergency aid for places like Rwanda, Somalia or Bosnia, depleting resources for seemingly less pressing projects like providing clean water to villages or helping countries immunize children, iodize their salt or distribute eyesight-saving doses...
NEWS
By David Kohn | April 9, 2009
From the 1960s to the 1980s, child mortality dropped drastically in the world's poorest regions. Vaccination, sanitation, health education and improved medical care saved millions of children. Most experts expected this success to continue automatically. It hasn't. Over the past two decades, child mortality has flat-lined; in some places, it's risen. Take Chad. There, a child has an astounding 1-in-5 chance of dying before age 5. That hasn't changed in two decades. In the U.S., an infant's risk of dying is less than 1 in 100. "The world started a revolution in child health but didn't finish it," says Johns Hopkins University researcher Jennifer Bryce, a leading child health expert.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 10, 2004
LONDON - Governments are failing the children of the world, with more than 1 billion living in a state of severe threat from hunger, disease, exploitation or lack of security, the United Nations children's agency said yesterday. In a distressing indictment, UNICEF said that in spite of some pockets of progress this year, "we've failed to deliver on the promise of childhood." "Too many governments are making informed, deliberate choices that actually hurt childhood," UNICEF executive director Carol Bellamy said as she unveiled the agency's annual State of the World's Children report.
NEWS
By Judy Pasternak and Judy Pasternak,Los Angeles Times | October 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush indicated yesterday that he would be willing to accept a larger increase for a children's health insurance program than the one he has proposed, but he defended his veto of the expansion of coverage approved by Congress. Bush's veto Wednesday set off an ideological battle about who holds responsibility for extending health care benefits to uninsured children: the government or the private sector. The congressional bill would spend $60 billion over five years to expand health coverage for children of the working poor and middle class, and it would pay for it with higher tobacco taxes.
NEWS
January 4, 1995
With welfare reform at the top of the new Republican-dominated Congress' agenda in 1995, the debate is heating up over what "reform" really means and how to get there. This month, House Republicans will propose setting a five-year limit on welfare benefits. Last week, the Clinton administration blasted the GOP plan, charging it would shove some 5.3 million children -- more than half the 9.7 million children who benefit from Aid to Families With Dependent Children, the nation's main welfare program -- off the rolls.
NEWS
December 23, 1995
THE UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND, or Unicef, is best-known for its efforts to improve the health and well-being of children. Better nutrition, clean water, health care, more schools -- these are the kinds of projects generally associated with this agency. But this year, in anticipation of its 50th anniversary in 1996, Unicef used its annual State of the World's Children report to move the agency into a new area: the devastating effects of war on children, particularly wars that target civilian populations as part of a military strategy.
NEWS
July 17, 2007
When the bipartisan leadership of the powerful Senate Finance Committee hammers out a deal to renew a popular health care program for poor children, as it did last week, odds are that something at least similar will be enacted. No doubt that's what has President Bush so worried that he's issuing veto threats before the first vote on the State Children's Health Insurance Program legislation has been cast. But with his bromides about federalized medicine - and the absurd suggestion that the working poor could afford private health insurance if only they got better tax treatment - Mr. Bush makes himself look hopelessly out of touch on this issue, even with GOP stalwarts.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 17, 1992
Pneumonia is now the biggest killer of children in the modern world, resulting in 3.6 million deaths annually, but in most cases the cure is a five-day course of antibiotics that costs only 25 cents, according to a U.N. report released yesterday.The means of stopping pneumonia and dozens of other childhood diseases are now "available and affordable," the report said, but countries are not making the necessary investments in basic medical care, sanitation and education."The present neglect," the report said, "is a scandal of which the public is largely unaware."
NEWS
By Noam N. Levey and Noam N. Levey,Tribune Washington Bureau | January 15, 2009
WASHINGTON - Congressional Democrats pushing to overhaul the nation's health care system - a major priority of President-elect Barack Obama - notched an early legislative victory yesterday as the House easily passed a bill to expand federally funded health coverage for children. The measure, which would cover an additional 4 million children and nearly halve the number of uninsured youngsters in the country, came more than a year after President George W. Bush vetoed similar bills, effectively blocking any growth in the State Children's Health Insurance Program.
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | April 20, 2008
When I first met Aichana while doing research in Africa, the heat from the Sahara that was sweeping through Mauritania's capital had made it so difficult to sleep indoors that she had thrown a mattress on the terrace of a friend's home. Aichana's dark skin blended easily into the night. The blue scarf she'd wrapped around her long hair was about the only bright spot coming from the shadows. Everything else about her faded into the blackness of the evening. I'd never met anyone like Aichana.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown and David Nitkin,Sun Reporters | October 15, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With the chances looking slim that Congress will be able to override President Bush's veto of the State Children's Health Insurance Program expansion this week, leaders on Capitol Hill and at the White House are bracing for a potentially bruising round of negotiations to keep current recipients covered. The popular program for moderate-income families expires in mid-November, and both sides face pressure to reach a deal that maintains funding. But they remain far apart on the costs of a program that Democrats and some Republicans want to expand by millions of children and tens of billions of dollars.
NEWS
By Judy Pasternak and Judy Pasternak,Los Angeles Times | October 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush indicated yesterday that he would be willing to accept a larger increase for a children's health insurance program than the one he has proposed, but he defended his veto of the expansion of coverage approved by Congress. Bush's veto Wednesday set off an ideological battle about who holds responsibility for extending health care benefits to uninsured children: the government or the private sector. The congressional bill would spend $60 billion over five years to expand health coverage for children of the working poor and middle class, and it would pay for it with higher tobacco taxes.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The House approved sweeping health care legislation yesterday that would expand government benefits for children, the elderly and doctors while boosting tobacco taxes and cutting Medicare payments to private insurance companies. The largely party-line 225-204 vote followed hours of debate and parliamentary stalling tactics by Republicans. Cheers rang out in the House chamber when Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a California Democrat, announced that the bill had passed. The House bill would expand a popular health insurance program mainly for the children of the working poor.
NEWS
July 17, 2007
When the bipartisan leadership of the powerful Senate Finance Committee hammers out a deal to renew a popular health care program for poor children, as it did last week, odds are that something at least similar will be enacted. No doubt that's what has President Bush so worried that he's issuing veto threats before the first vote on the State Children's Health Insurance Program legislation has been cast. But with his bromides about federalized medicine - and the absurd suggestion that the working poor could afford private health insurance if only they got better tax treatment - Mr. Bush makes himself look hopelessly out of touch on this issue, even with GOP stalwarts.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and David Nitkin and Matthew Hay Brown and David Nitkin,Sun Reporters | October 15, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With the chances looking slim that Congress will be able to override President Bush's veto of the State Children's Health Insurance Program expansion this week, leaders on Capitol Hill and at the White House are bracing for a potentially bruising round of negotiations to keep current recipients covered. The popular program for moderate-income families expires in mid-November, and both sides face pressure to reach a deal that maintains funding. But they remain far apart on the costs of a program that Democrats and some Republicans want to expand by millions of children and tens of billions of dollars.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | October 5, 1993
THE news reports concentrated on the costs of policing the globe, on the United States' place in the New World Order and on the United Nations' role in hot spots from Bosnia to Somalia.All of those, of course, are legitimate issues of grave magnitude, and I expected President Clinton would wax eloquent on them in his address to the United Nations last week.Yet none of the half-dozen news reports I saw mentioned what Mr. Clinton said about the most critical issue facing the leaders of the world today -- the unconscionable deaths of children from preventable diseases and hunger, at home and abroad.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | March 14, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Advocates are rolling out slick marketing campaigns and a stream of media events to bolster a children's insurance program that the Bush administration wants to curtail, and one group has enlisted Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley in the push for more federal aid. O'Malley, a Democrat, is to speak here today when the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation introduces a $3 million advertising campaign designed to press Congress to renew and increase spending...
NEWS
By Douglas E. Abrams | December 24, 2006
COLUMBIA, Mo. -- With the holidays upon us, thoughts will turn soon to New Year's resolutions. More than 35 million children - nearly half the children in America - play sports each year, so plenty of parents and coaches would do well to resolve to make sports better for boys and girls in 2007. "Making sports better" means no more adults slugging one another at games for children as young as 6. No more "select" teams that cut 8-year-olds. No more adults whose zeal to win has fueled an epidemic of overuse injuries in preteens pushed too hard, too fast.
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