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By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2000
In 1984, Dee Wright was reading a magazine article about Michael Jackson when she happened upon this stray fact: While Jackson slept in California, he was making money in Europe. It was as if an imaginary cash register was going ka-ching every second of the day, as dollars, pounds, lira and deutsche marks flowed into Jackson's coffers. Perhaps you, too, read this article, or a similar one. But the difference between you and Wright is that she underlined the sentences, filed them away, figuratively if not literally.
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NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | March 21, 2007
It might be the most honeyed phrase a home cook can hear: "This [your recipe here] tastes like a million bucks!" If it won the Pillsbury Bake-Off, it would taste like a million bucks, because that's the grand prize. Just ask a prize-winning cook like Josie A.G. Shapiro of Chicago what she has won: "a honeymoon in France!" Or ask seasoned contest cook Gloria Bradley of Naperville, Ill., what pleased her most: "Impress the kids by appearing in the National Enquirer!" And there's still more!
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1997
When the big green dinosaur started shaking its tail on the dance floor, Will Meissinger just had to laugh.It was a welcome moment of holiday merriment for Will, a cancer patient who defied doctors' grim diagnosis by celebrating his 10th birthday last month. For his parents, it was a Christmas gift worth treasuring."Every smile, to me, means as much as a million bucks," his mother, Deidre Meissinger, said yesterday as the Grant-A-Wish Foundation's holiday party raged around her."Christmas means more to me this year than it ever has in the 32 years I've been alive," she added.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | April 27, 2006
At the Shell station where I sometimes buy gas, a gallon of regular unleaded was going for $2.98 the other day, and it felt like a bargain. Two-ninety-eight?! I was giddy. Down the road, they were charging $3.05 and $3.07 and other prices you usually couldn't get without holding a knife to someone's throat. So seeing $2.98, it was all I could do not to break out the champagne and confetti right there at pump 4. Oh, yes, I wanted to crank up a Van Morrison CD and wave over the guy at pump 2 and the woman at pump 3 with the crazy hair and start the party, because $2.98 was probably the best we were going to do for the rest of our lives.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1997
Orioles outfielder B. J. Surhoff had two chances to make someone a millionaire yesterday, but he happily settled for one of the biggest offensive performances of his career and a 9-5 victory over the Seattle Mariners before 47,451 at Camden Yards.Surhoff had an RBI single, a home run and a three-run triple in his first three at-bats, putting him within a gapper of hitting for the cycle for the first time in his career. He had two more at-bats -- either of which could have meant a cool million for Lin Bauernschub of Ellicott City, yesterday's participant in a television promotion that rewards a fan with just less than the average major-league salary if an Oriole hits for the cycle.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 14, 1993
The whole thing started like this: I'm watching TV and here's this commercial for this new movie "Indecent Proposal," and it shows Demi Moore and Woody Harrelson all over each other.The movie is about this wealthy guy (Robert Redford) who offers this hard-luck couple (Moore and Harrelson) a million dollars if the woman will sleep with him.So just to make conversation, I say to Nancy: "What about it?"She's got her head buried in this book. But I can tell she wants to talk. Fifteen years of marriage, you can tell when a person wants to talk.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 15, 1991
Michael Jackson has never been one for half-measures, but even by his extravagant standards, the ''Black or White'' video -- which premiered on MTV, BET and the Fox network last night -- is amazing.Looking like a million bucks (and costing four million), the 11-minute clip is a state-of-the-art stunner -- so spectacular, in fact, that you might not even notice there's a song attached. That may not be the effect he had in mind. But with so much to watch, who had time to listen?First, there was McCauley Culkin, blasting his TV dad (''Cheers'' star George Wendt)
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | April 4, 1997
You may have heard that Albert Belle of the Chicago White Sox, who has managed to parlay his peculiar combination of baseball talent and sociopathic behavior into a paycheck of $10 million a year, is now earning more than the entire 25-man roster of the stripped-down Pittsburgh Pirates ($9 million).This is a remarkable development, to be sure. For one thing, it means Belle can afford to field his own team and still earn a million bucks a year. But how does $10 million a year really stack up?
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 24, 2000
BOSTON -- Mind you, the pope got half-a-million bucks more for his book. But then John Paul II is infallible, which was worth something extra. Besides, anyone who published the pontiff could figure that if the book didn't make back the advance -- and it didn't -- the company still had better access to Paradise. What exactly was Simon & Schuster, the child of Viacom, praying for when the publishers anted up some 8 million bucks for the memoirs of Hillary Rodham Clinton? A marketing miracle?
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 17, 1992
"We're going to buy a house, a boat, a Harley Davidson motorcycle and two new cars."-- Mark Gaydos, who along with his wife Sherry won $4.8 million in Maryland's Lotto game.The article about the newest lottery winners appeared in a roundup section of the local rag, and I read it expecting the usual claptrap about putting the money in the bank or saving it for the kids' college education blah, blah, blah.This is the sort of nonsense that traditionally emanates from the mouths of lottery winners.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 15, 2005
WHENEVER pro athletes mouth the clichM-i, "It's not about the money," we chuckle and think to ourselves, "Great, let's switch paychecks." But for recreational fishermen, it's never about the green, except for those ugly moments when it's time to fill the tank on the Grady White, pay a launch fee or shell out for some new gottahaveitnow lightweight tackle. So it makes your ears perk up when the folks in Annapolis and a locally based marine company say they're putting on a million-dollar fishing tournament.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 26, 2004
TURN ON COMPUTER, check e-mail, another sunny day in Spam Country. Wade through usual dozen ads for male enhancement products. Promises of incredible growth, renewed vigor, sustained activity - what are we talking about here, the stock market? Uh, maybe not. "Experience hours and hours of primal, mind-blowing sex!" one ad screams. Geez, sounds absolutely terrifying. Where's the delete key? Oh, look. Another e-mail from my Nigerian friends. These guys are terrific. Former government officials, widows of high-ranking military officers, prominent scientists on the lam - but they always take time out of their busy schedules to stay in touch.
FEATURES
By John Coffren and By John Coffren,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2001
When it was over, when his wobbly wounded duck of a field goal had successfully cleared the crossbar, winning him an expensive new car and the adulation of nearly 69,000 fans at PSINet Stadium yesterday afternoon, Richard Pangle had just one thought: "I'll finally get some sleep tonight." Actually, that probably was his second thought. It would be hard not to think about the fact that if his kick, a halftime promotion for a local car dealership group, had sailed just a little more to the left, he might have been walking away a millionaire and a Mercedes-Benz owner.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | March 11, 2001
All the clothes on the spring 2001 runways have one thing in common: super-high prices. Two hundred dollars for a pair of shorts? Not in this lifetime. You don't have to spend a fortune to look like a million bucks -- you just have to be savvy. The key is to know what's hot and where to find it -- or something that closely resembles it -- without shelling out a fortune. To see what's new and cool, try checking out the department and specialty stores to note what's filling their racks, but before you buy, visit a discount store and see if you can find the same styles at less-expensive prices.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 24, 2000
BOSTON -- Mind you, the pope got half-a-million bucks more for his book. But then John Paul II is infallible, which was worth something extra. Besides, anyone who published the pontiff could figure that if the book didn't make back the advance -- and it didn't -- the company still had better access to Paradise. What exactly was Simon & Schuster, the child of Viacom, praying for when the publishers anted up some 8 million bucks for the memoirs of Hillary Rodham Clinton? A marketing miracle?
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | September 10, 2000
It seems the only way to become a millionaire nowadays is to get in on the ground floor of a dot.com, answer trivia questions from a game-show host, or out-connive your island mates to claim a seven-figure prize. Of course, that's not true. Many financial advisers say most of their millionaire clients still tend to be those who earned wealth the old-fashioned, some might say boring, way: They regularly invested, sometimes small amounts of money, in the stock market over many years and lived below their means.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky | May 28, 1991
This is the easy part, leaders of the Vote Know Coalition say. By midnight Friday, the anti-abortion organization campaigningto petition Maryland's new abortion law to referendum must deliver its first installment of signatures to the secretary of state."
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
If you were about to be dropped on a deserted island and could bring only one thing, what would it be? More than your survival is riding on your answer. The right item could also be worth a million bucks -- but we'll get to that in a minute. Sandra Kaufmann is considering the merits of aluminum foil: "It's light, reflective, you can cook in it, and make cups, and use it to attract fish -- they like shiny things -- and if you had lots of it, you could waterproof a house." Kaufmann has clearly given this a lot of thought, and for good reason: She might actually be sent to a tropical island in the South China Sea. If she can last 39 days, she might win the million bucks.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | June 4, 2000
Less than two weeks to go, and there were workers everywhere. Controlled mayhem was the order of the day. The night before, Scott Hagan had looked at the spindles going up the banister in the grand staircase. Too small, he thought. Awkward. Rip 'em out and start over. The next day - one by one - dozens of spindles were being replaced by a worker. At any given time, there might be eight, maybe 10, workers going about their business at a Hagan and Hamilton Custom Home job site. Today, about 30 have marched through the synthetic stucco and quarry stone home with its marble and hardwood floors that will open Friday to the public as the MASCO Home of the Year.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2000
In 1984, Dee Wright was reading a magazine article about Michael Jackson when she happened upon this stray fact: While Jackson slept in California, he was making money in Europe. It was as if an imaginary cash register was going ka-ching every second of the day, as dollars, pounds, lira and deutsche marks flowed into Jackson's coffers. Perhaps you, too, read this article, or a similar one. But the difference between you and Wright is that she underlined the sentences, filed them away, figuratively if not literally.
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