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NEWS
By John H. Cushman Jr. and John H. Cushman Jr.,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 1998
WASHINGTON -- More than 1 million acres of U.S. wetlands vanished from 1985 to 1995, a period in which the government imposed tough new protections for the threatened ecosystems and set a national goal of ending the losses, the Clinton administration has estimated.In the first comprehensive survey of the nation's wetlands to be published since 1990, and the first to try to show the effects of those new policies, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service estimated that during the decade wetlands continued to disappear at an average rate of 117,000 acres a year.
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NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | July 13, 2008
As their planting season progressed, Maryland farmers altered earlier plans and seeded less corn and more soybeans than they originally intended. In March, farmers announced plans to plant 490,000 acres of corn this year. That would have been a decline of 9.26 percent from the 2007 planting, the largest in 15 years. That thinking changed, however, when diesel fuel used to power their big rigs began creeping closer to $5 a gallon, fertilizer costs went through the roof and rains limited their days in the field.
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NEWS
By Maya Bell and Maya Bell,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 24, 2004
MIAMI - Seeking to highlight his commitment to the environment, President Bush returned to the vital swing state of Florida yesterday with a promise to create or safeguard at least 3 million acres of wetlands across the nation. With his brother, Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, at his side, the president also managed to squeeze in two fund-raisers on two Florida coasts, hauling in $4.4 million for the national Republican Party. Stopping first at the Rookery Bay Estuarine Research Reserve near Naples, Bush promised an appreciative crowd he would preserve Florida's natural beauty.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | February 25, 2007
The same new homes that are gobbling up farmland across Maryland at an alarming rate have provided a boon to the turf grass industry, an often-overlooked sector of the state's agriculture industry. An estimated 1.1 million acres -- nearly 20 percent of Maryland's land -- is covered by maintained grass, and by far the greatest portion adorns the yards of single-family homes, according to a recent study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The study also concluded that turf grass is a $1.5 billion industry in Maryland, in terms of dollars spent on equipment and the production, maintenance and use of turf grass products and services.
BUSINESS
By Christine Shenot and Christine Shenot,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 14, 2002
ORLANDO, Fla. - The hired hands are milling around the barn in the gray light of dawn, getting ready for another day in the saddle, when Jennings Overstreet pulls up. In this rustic corner of Osceola County, Fla., miles from the rush-hour masses swarming to the north, morning is unfolding to an almost-forgotten rhythm amid the smells of sweet hay, leather and damp earth. A dog barks at the stir of activity; the horses snort and shuffle impatiently. Down on Lake Tohopekaliga, in front of the house Overstreet's father built in 1935 for $800, a flock of sandhill cranes feeds noisily.
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 6, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration took sweeping action yesterday to open nearly 60 million acres -- about one-third of the national forests -- to road construction, which in turn could lead to logging, mining and other commercial use of the previously protected areas. Though lawsuits are pending over the issue, the plan undoes the "roadless rule" that President Bill Clinton ordered in 2001 during his last days in office. The rule had banned further road construction in 58.5 million acres of national forests, nearly all in Western states.
NEWS
By Rudy Abramson and Rudy Abramson,Los Angeles Times | January 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- After months of studying the economic cost of protecting the threatened northern spotted owl, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said yesterday that it has designated 6.88 million acres of old-growth forest in Washington, Oregon and Northern California as habitat critical to the creature's survival.Federal officials have estimated that saving the owl could cost 33,000 jobs in the Northwest, but the timber industry maintains that the toll could reach 80,000 to 100,000.The designation, which in effect would restrict timber-cutting on the land, is still subject to review by the Department of the Interior and is likely to face other challenges.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Ending eight years of deadlock, the Senate yesterday overwhelmingly approved legislation to protect a vast part of the California desert by creating three new national parks and 74 wilderness areas.By a vote of 69 to 29, the Senate agreed to add almost 6.4 million acres to some 3 million California desert acres already under federal management to preserve unique wildlife and flowers, sites of ancient civilizations, the last intact dinosaur tracks in North America and awe-inspiring scenery that has changed little in thousands of years.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | July 20, 2006
When conservationists talk about "saving" this and "protecting" that, logical questions might be: Saving it from whom? Protecting it from whom? And why should the government force what you want on someone else - who obviously wants something different, or there would not be an issue in the first place? After all, the Constitution says that all citizens are entitled to the "equal protection of the laws." Such questions almost never get asked. Nor do evidence or logic play much of a role in most conservation issues.
NEWS
April 21, 1999
The Boston Globe said in an editorial Monday:AMERICA's Western landscape is a unique natural asset, dazzling in its grandeur and fragile despite its massive structures, vulnerable to intrusions that disrupt wildlife, terrain and the simple quality of unspoiled vistas. A good program for protecting such lands by designating them as wilderness areas has already helped a lot. It should be extended to other areas in need of a shield against desecration.Utah is a dramatic case in point. The Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance has been engaged in a diligent cataloging of that state's terrain to nominate it for congressional designation as wilderness.
NEWS
By MARNI GOLDBERG and MARNI GOLDBERG,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Senate moved closer yesterday to approving legislation that would make 8.3 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico available for oil and natural gas drilling and end a quarter-century ban against tapping the rich energy resources in coastal waters. Facing increasing prices for crude oil and natural gas, which have left Americans paying more for gasoline and for heating and cooling their homes, the bill's proponents say this represents an opportunity for America to increase domestic supplies of energy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Senate Republicans have agreed on legislation that would open four times more of the Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas drilling than the Bush administration was seeking, and a vote on the bill is expected this week. The bill is the Senate's only energy measure with a chance to pass this year and would open 8.3 million acres of the Gulf to new drilling for oil and natural gas. The bill is more ambitious than the administration's plan to open 2 million acres for a five-year period, starting in 2007.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | July 20, 2006
When conservationists talk about "saving" this and "protecting" that, logical questions might be: Saving it from whom? Protecting it from whom? And why should the government force what you want on someone else - who obviously wants something different, or there would not be an issue in the first place? After all, the Constitution says that all citizens are entitled to the "equal protection of the laws." Such questions almost never get asked. Nor do evidence or logic play much of a role in most conservation issues.
NEWS
By DAVID MUHLY | April 19, 2006
Maryland residents again have the chance to protect their national forests under the latest proposal by the Bush administration to sell public land to pay for funding for rural schools. This would include over 10,000 acres in the nearby Monongahela and George Washington and Jefferson national forests and an additional 21,000 acres elsewhere in the Appalachian region. We have a finite amount of public land available for habitat protection, hunting, fishing, hiking and other recreation, especially for Eastern metropolitan areas such as Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 6, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration took sweeping action yesterday to open nearly 60 million acres -- about one-third of the national forests -- to road construction, which in turn could lead to logging, mining and other commercial use of the previously protected areas. Though lawsuits are pending over the issue, the plan undoes the "roadless rule" that President Bill Clinton ordered in 2001 during his last days in office. The rule had banned further road construction in 58.5 million acres of national forests, nearly all in Western states.
NEWS
July 15, 2004
ELECTED OFFICIALS in Western states grumble frequently that so much of the land within their borders is federally owned. Dad-blasted Easterners junked up and clear-cut most of their end of the continent, but demand that millions of acres of Western wilderness remain wild because that's about all there is left to protect. So, there's cheering in the mesas and the mountains, from Alaska to the Rio Grande, because President Bush has decided to reverse a long-developed course on national wilderness protection policy by essentially leaving such decisions up to the locals.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2000
In the Region New Web site has announcements about Md. companies The Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development said yesterday that PR Newswire, a New York-based business news and public relations service, has begun providing announcements about Maryland companies on a DBED Web site, www.choosemaryland.org. The Web site also offers such information as business-licensing requirements and contacts, export and import facts and business resources that the state offers. Metastorm acquires e-business consultant Metastorm Inc., a Severna Park developer and marketer of electronic business software, said it has acquired Software Systems Group, a Springfield, Va., government e-business consultant.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2001
POTHOLES MUST be patched, highways ever-widened, and broken sewers, downed power lines and crumbling bridges repaired without fail. We accept these facts of modern life and unblinkingly spend billions on repair and improvement. Not maintaining the infrastructure would unquestionably lead to economic and social decline. It's past time to begin putting our "green" infrastructure on the same footing. I'm looking as I write at a remarkable map of Maryland, prepared from satellite and aerial photos.
NEWS
By Maya Bell and Maya Bell,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 24, 2004
MIAMI - Seeking to highlight his commitment to the environment, President Bush returned to the vital swing state of Florida yesterday with a promise to create or safeguard at least 3 million acres of wetlands across the nation. With his brother, Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, at his side, the president also managed to squeeze in two fund-raisers on two Florida coasts, hauling in $4.4 million for the national Republican Party. Stopping first at the Rookery Bay Estuarine Research Reserve near Naples, Bush promised an appreciative crowd he would preserve Florida's natural beauty.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2004
IN THE LIFETIMES of many readers of this column, we've developed more of Maryland's rural landscape than in the three centuries after the state's founding in 1632. Look around at what we have wrought during your daily commute and ask yourself: What would two or three times the current development look like? How would it be to drive in? What opportunities for recreation would remain? I can't prove a doubling or tripling of development is the future, but consider the pace we're on. Of Maryland's 6.2 million land acres, 1.2 million, almost 20 percent of the state, was developed by 2000, according to the Maryland Department of Planning.
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