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NEWS
By Gil Sandler | November 15, 1994
FOR MOST BALTIMOREANS, memories of Thanksgivings past are of turkey dinners, the whole family gathered around, the parades, the City-Poly football classics. But for Elmer "Bud" Klunk Thanksgiving meant "the lottery."For years, he worked on Thanksgivings as maitre d at one of Baltimore's most popular restaurants of its day -- Miller Brothers, which was located on Fayette Street, near where the Omni Hotel is today.Klunk recalled the Great Miller Brothers' Employee Turkey Dinner Lottery. "On the morning of every Thanksgiving Day," Mr. Klunk recalled, "the 100 or so employees set up a lottery -- $1 got you into the action.
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SPORTS
Courtesy of Inside Lacrosse magazine | May 24, 2012
•There were no youth leagues in their native Warrenton, Va., when David and Matt Miller wanted to begin playing lacrosse. And a journey that began in the backyard with their mother teaching them how to play while using the wooden women's sticks from her college days continues this weekend, with both brothers playing in the Division I men's semifinals. David Miller is a senior at Maryland and a starting short-stick defensive midfielder. Matt Miller , a junior, is starting defenseman for Notre Dame, the top-ranked defense in the nation.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | April 30, 1992
There were no limousines idling outside Miller Brothersclothing store yesterday. With all the briskness of the 1990s, the traffic sped by the signs in the window announcing the end of a North Charles Street era.But Phyllis Aguilar, who came to sell clothing to Baltimore's finest ladies when Harry Truman was president, recalls another era -- a more gracious time when elegant women's clothing stores lined Charles Street from Lexington to Biddle and "it was...
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 16, 2010
Every so often, I'm asked a question that causes me to scratch my head. Linda Nevaldine, who is working on an event to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the founding of Druid Hill Park, wants to know: Just what is Maryland-style food? This sent me to a box of stuff I've saved for years and kept under my bed. I have menus from the old Rennert Hotel, Marconi's and Miller Brothers, all in downtown Baltimore, all within easy walking distance from each other. What they served would constitute a pretty fair representation of top fare here.
FEATURES
By Donna Peremes | January 13, 1991
In a retail fashion world full of pricey designer suits and opulently extravagant evening wear, the Leslie Fay label is proud to point out a pretty impressive figure: 85 percent of its designs retail for under $100.Lori Streaker, dresses buyer for Miller Brothers, believes thastyle and quality are not sacrificed for the reasonable prices. The line offers "a good fit, and an important look for the price tag: moderately priced, with up-to-date designs," she says. (Miller Brothers carries Leslie Fay Petite.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1995
No skin. No fat. The four plump chicken breasts browned up nicely -- and healthfully -- on the smokeless indoor grill at Samm's juice and sandwich bar in Towson's Merritt Athletic Club.The chicken, marinated in garlic, herbs and lemon juice, is delicious in a sandwich with Muenster cheese and bacon, but it pales beside the culinary grandeur of Miller Brothers Restaurant -- for a half century "The Place to Eat" in Baltimore and now memorialized on the wall at Samm's.Samm's is an exercise in Baltimore nostalgia as well as a working snack bar. It commemorates Miller Brothers, a fixture at 119 W. Fayette St. until 1963, and the late Sam Roggio, its last head chef, said Larry Roggio, Samm's proprietor and Mr. Roggio's grandson.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | November 21, 1995
FOR MOST OF 51 years (1912-1963) Miller Brothers on Fayette Street, where the Omni hotel is today, was one of Baltimore's premiere institutions, rivaled in its day only by Haussner's in East Baltimore.Miller Brothers dominated the Baltimore restaurant scene as no restaurant does today. Elk, bear and buffalo steak all found their way onto its menu.At Thanksgiving, according to Bud Klunk, maitre de for 21 years, Miller Brothers would serve more than 1,000 turkey dinners. The help, he said, took bets on how many dinners would actually be served.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 16, 2010
Every so often, I'm asked a question that causes me to scratch my head. Linda Nevaldine, who is working on an event to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the founding of Druid Hill Park, wants to know: Just what is Maryland-style food? This sent me to a box of stuff I've saved for years and kept under my bed. I have menus from the old Rennert Hotel, Marconi's and Miller Brothers, all in downtown Baltimore, all within easy walking distance from each other. What they served would constitute a pretty fair representation of top fare here.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1998
WHEN THEY WERE constructed about 1900, the stone- fronted buildings at 1110 and 1112 N. Charles St. in Balti- more served as resi- dences for well-to-do Baltimoreans. From 1926 to 1996, they were owned by Miller Brothers Co., a local clothier and furrier.Starting next year, they will have a new life: The American Urological Association plans to convert them to an addition for its national headquarters at 1120 N. Charles."We're going to need it," said Deborah Scoblick, the association's director of administration.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 30, 1990
KENNEDYVILLE -- Farmers are a curious breed. They're always keeping an eye on their neighbor's fields and his farming practices. But this year, farmers around this rural Kent County community are paying more attention then ever to Gary Miller's corn crop.Gary Miller and his three brothers run 3-M's Farm, a grain-growing operation that spreads over 3,000 acres of some of the flattest land in all of Maryland. But it's just a small patch of their farm -- a 400-acre cornfield that butts up against Turner's Creek -- that captured the attention of farmers throughout the county and around much of the rest of the state this year.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 11, 2000
"This is not a eulogy, this is truly a celebration," said Leslie King-Hammond as she looked out over a colorful crowd of friends, colleagues and family gathered last night to celebrate the life and art of Tom Miller. Nearly 200 members of the local art community came to the auditorium of the Baltimore Museum of Art to memorialize the city's inventive native son and creator of "Afro-Deco" style painted furniture who died June 23 at the age of 54. "This is about tributes and acknowledgments for someone who has performed tremendous service for Baltimore City," said King-Hammond, a dean at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, where Miller earned bachelor's and master's degrees.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1998
WHEN THEY WERE constructed about 1900, the stone- fronted buildings at 1110 and 1112 N. Charles St. in Balti- more served as resi- dences for well-to-do Baltimoreans. From 1926 to 1996, they were owned by Miller Brothers Co., a local clothier and furrier.Starting next year, they will have a new life: The American Urological Association plans to convert them to an addition for its national headquarters at 1120 N. Charles."We're going to need it," said Deborah Scoblick, the association's director of administration.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | November 21, 1995
FOR MOST OF 51 years (1912-1963) Miller Brothers on Fayette Street, where the Omni hotel is today, was one of Baltimore's premiere institutions, rivaled in its day only by Haussner's in East Baltimore.Miller Brothers dominated the Baltimore restaurant scene as no restaurant does today. Elk, bear and buffalo steak all found their way onto its menu.At Thanksgiving, according to Bud Klunk, maitre de for 21 years, Miller Brothers would serve more than 1,000 turkey dinners. The help, he said, took bets on how many dinners would actually be served.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1995
No skin. No fat. The four plump chicken breasts browned up nicely -- and healthfully -- on the smokeless indoor grill at Samm's juice and sandwich bar in Towson's Merritt Athletic Club.The chicken, marinated in garlic, herbs and lemon juice, is delicious in a sandwich with Muenster cheese and bacon, but it pales beside the culinary grandeur of Miller Brothers Restaurant -- for a half century "The Place to Eat" in Baltimore and now memorialized on the wall at Samm's.Samm's is an exercise in Baltimore nostalgia as well as a working snack bar. It commemorates Miller Brothers, a fixture at 119 W. Fayette St. until 1963, and the late Sam Roggio, its last head chef, said Larry Roggio, Samm's proprietor and Mr. Roggio's grandson.
NEWS
By Gil Sandler | November 15, 1994
FOR MOST BALTIMOREANS, memories of Thanksgivings past are of turkey dinners, the whole family gathered around, the parades, the City-Poly football classics. But for Elmer "Bud" Klunk Thanksgiving meant "the lottery."For years, he worked on Thanksgivings as maitre d at one of Baltimore's most popular restaurants of its day -- Miller Brothers, which was located on Fayette Street, near where the Omni Hotel is today.Klunk recalled the Great Miller Brothers' Employee Turkey Dinner Lottery. "On the morning of every Thanksgiving Day," Mr. Klunk recalled, "the 100 or so employees set up a lottery -- $1 got you into the action.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Paddling against the tide that has swept retailers to the suburban malls, Miller Brothers, a longtime Baltimore retail fixture, has returned to its old haunts on Charles Street after abandoning its Towson Town Center shop of 35 years."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 11, 2000
"This is not a eulogy, this is truly a celebration," said Leslie King-Hammond as she looked out over a colorful crowd of friends, colleagues and family gathered last night to celebrate the life and art of Tom Miller. Nearly 200 members of the local art community came to the auditorium of the Baltimore Museum of Art to memorialize the city's inventive native son and creator of "Afro-Deco" style painted furniture who died June 23 at the age of 54. "This is about tributes and acknowledgments for someone who has performed tremendous service for Baltimore City," said King-Hammond, a dean at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, where Miller earned bachelor's and master's degrees.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Paddling against the tide that has swept retailers to the suburban malls, Miller Brothers, a longtime Baltimore retail fixture, has returned to its old haunts on Charles Street after abandoning its Towson Town Center shop of 35 years."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | November 3, 1992
The first thing Terry Murray did when he arrived at practice yesterday was have a talk with veteran left wing Kelly Miller. It's the kind of priority a coach has when his team includes several sets of brothers.Sunday night, Washington Capitals management traded Kelly Miller's brother, Kevin, to the St. Louis Blues for defenseman Paul Cavallini."I was a little worried about Kelly," said Murray. "But he says he understands the situation and he's a true professional. He knows the game needs to move on. Kelly has a lot of character."
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
Devastated by the opening-round playoff flop against the Pittsburgh Penguins, Washington Capitals general manager David Poile took the first major step yesterday toward what he hopes will correct the situation, trading popular right wing Dino Ciccarelli to the Detroit Red Wings for right wing Kevin Miller."
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