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Millard Tawes

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NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Joanna Daemmrich and Michael Dresser contributed to this article | July 16, 1998
CRISFIELD -- Maybe it was the beer, maybe it was the crabs. But as Maryland's political universe crammed itself into this bayside town for its annual crab feast yesterday, a bipartisan reunion broke out among old enemies and friends.Republicans found themselves singing the marching tune of Democrat Eileen M. Rehrmann's campaign for governor. Democrats swapped tales of the late Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein's many appearances here.And former Gov. William Donald Schaefer -- attending his first Crisfield crab feast since leaving office -- was greeted as a conquering hero.
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NEWS
June 9, 2012
David Cordish seems to have set up a winner with the Maryland Live! casino in Arundel Mills ("Maryland Live! casino opens its doors," June 7), but the name that comes to my mind is much older: Millard Tawes. He was a governor, like many, the state would have been much better without. His "I know what is good for people" attitude took slot machines away from Maryland in the mid '60s, so instead of being the East Coast leader in allowing people to enjoy gaming, the state became a terrible also ran. Steven Sass, Baltimore
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NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1997
GOV. PARRIS N. Glendening had an abrupt reversal of vacation plans late last week, a decision that pleased his political advisers to no end.Glendening had long scheduled the next two weeks off for his annual vacation -- first to drop Maryland's First Son, Raymond, off at college and then to head to the Southwest with Mrs. G.But the governor apparently saw the wisdom in returning to the )) sunny Eastern Shore between trips tomorrow for the 21st annual J. Millard Tawes Crab & Clam Bake -- which is still viewed as the political event of the summer (though the annual Rocky Gap Festival in Cumberland is closing fast)
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | July 18, 2008
Hundreds of Maryland politicos gather on a parking lot every July to eat crabs, talk politics, sweat, sweat some more, and honor a long-gone governor. OK, nobody spends a whole lot of time paying tribute to Gov. J. Millard Tawes at his namesake crabfest in Crisfield. But when the event rolled around the other day, the guy who ran Maryland from 1959 to 1967 got more attention than usual. Marylanders United to Stop Slots used the occasion to remind everyone that the two-termer ran slots out of the state.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
CRISFIELD - Here are the rules of the annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clambake: Bring your own cardboard box. It's easier to haul bigger loads of steamed Maryland blue crabs and ears of corn back to your picnic bench. Bring an empty stomach. For 30 bucks, you'll get all the seafood you want, plus all the beer to wash it down. And be ready to talk politics. "This is the Super Bowl of all politics," said Del. Rudolph C. Cane, a Wicomico County Democrat. "Everybody was networking, trying to get a touchdown.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1958: J. Millard Tawes is elected governor1962: March storm smashes Ocean City1962: Sit-in demonstrators are arrested
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2006
Before William Donald Schaefer, who was Maryland?s last bachelor governor? A) Millard Tawes B) Egbert Souse C) Albert Richie Find the answer to this and 9 more questions at baltimoresun.com; a new quiz will appear online every Monday
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | June 23, 1996
25 years ago (week of June 20-26, 1971):The Thomas Viaduct in Elkridge was declared a National Historic Landmark by the U.S. Department of the Interior.Plans were announced for the Institute for the Study of the Black Experience in Howard County under the sponsorship of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Institute volunteers planned to reconstruct the county's black heritage from church records and similar documentation, as well as from interviews with older county residents.
NEWS
June 10, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley might keep in mind the "High Society Revolt" of 1967 as he plans this summer's wining and dining in the state capital. On June 13, 1967, The Sun reported that Gov. Spiro T. Agnew had outraged Annapolis' cultural elite by suggesting that the yearly "music and champagne bash" of the Annapolis Fine Arts Festival be held somewhere other than the State House. Agnew felt the event was too frivolous for the location. Organizers lashed back, snubbing the anti-social Agnew by removing his name from the guest list for the festival's traditional candlelight visit to the historic Hammond-Harwood House.
NEWS
June 9, 2012
David Cordish seems to have set up a winner with the Maryland Live! casino in Arundel Mills ("Maryland Live! casino opens its doors," June 7), but the name that comes to my mind is much older: Millard Tawes. He was a governor, like many, the state would have been much better without. His "I know what is good for people" attitude took slot machines away from Maryland in the mid '60s, so instead of being the East Coast leader in allowing people to enjoy gaming, the state became a terrible also ran. Steven Sass, Baltimore
NEWS
December 16, 2007
Philip Wesley Tawes, a retired insurance executive and son of former Maryland Gov. J. Millard Tawes, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Dec. 7 at his Crisfield home. He was 85. Mr. Tawes, who was born and raised in Crisfield, was also the son of the late Avalynne Gibson Tawes. He was a 1939 graduate of Crisfield High School and left the University of Maryland to enlist in the Army during World War II. He served with Company L 1229th Division from Crisfield and landed at Normandy, France, on June 12, 1944.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | July 14, 2007
Lady Bird Johnson, the widow of President Lyndon B. Johnson who died this week, made several visits to Baltimore before, during and after her husband's years in Washington. Baltimoreans got their first glimpse of her during the presidential campaign of 1960, when she "brought a white-gloved touch of Texas" to the city, reported The Sun. The first reception, attended by 500 women, was held in the Guilford home of Dr. Mildred Otenesak, a Democratic national committeewoman. Otenesak told reporters she was "overwhelmed" at the turnout -- which included Helen Avalynne Tawes, wife of Gov. J. Millard Tawes -- since she had expected no more than 300 women at the reception.
NEWS
June 10, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley might keep in mind the "High Society Revolt" of 1967 as he plans this summer's wining and dining in the state capital. On June 13, 1967, The Sun reported that Gov. Spiro T. Agnew had outraged Annapolis' cultural elite by suggesting that the yearly "music and champagne bash" of the Annapolis Fine Arts Festival be held somewhere other than the State House. Agnew felt the event was too frivolous for the location. Organizers lashed back, snubbing the anti-social Agnew by removing his name from the guest list for the festival's traditional candlelight visit to the historic Hammond-Harwood House.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2006
Before William Donald Schaefer, who was Maryland?s last bachelor governor? A) Millard Tawes B) Egbert Souse C) Albert Richie Find the answer to this and 9 more questions at baltimoresun.com; a new quiz will appear online every Monday
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | August 5, 2006
Louis Nicholas "Buster" Phipps Jr., an Annapolis businessman who was once the state's director of Chesapeake Bay Affairs, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Sunday at La Casa Assisted Living. He was 78. Born on Prince George Street in Annapolis, the son of a state senator and Anne Arundel County political leader who had been mayor of the state capital, Mr. Phipps served in the Army at the end of World War II. He graduated from the University of Maryland in 1950, where he was an All-American lacrosse player, and played football under coach Paul Bryant.
NEWS
December 4, 2005
1965: reapportionment tussle On Dec. 2, 1965, a citizens' committee contended that the Maryland legislature's reapportionment bill, which would retain one senator for each county, "cannot pass constitutional muster" under Supreme Court rulings. "It contains numerous and substantial departures from the controlling requirement that representation ... must be apportioned on a substantially equal population basis," the Maryland Committee for Fair Representation said. The committee urged the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to declare invalid the reapportionment bill and uphold a rival plan that would create a 43-member Senate based more closely on population and combining smaller counties into senatorial districts.
NEWS
October 27, 2002
Renee B. Jabine, a former administrative aide to Gov. J. Millard Tawes and owner of an Annapolis catering firm, died of respiratory failure Monday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. She was 77 and lived in Annapolis. Born Renee Brendel in Baltimore and raised on a farm in Atholton, she graduated from Howard County High School. During World War II, she worked for the FBI in Washington. In the late 1940s, she worked as an office supervisor for a Baltimore advertising agency. She was an administrative assistant and speech writer to J. Millard Tawes, who served as governor of Maryland from 1959 to 1967.
NEWS
December 16, 2007
Philip Wesley Tawes, a retired insurance executive and son of former Maryland Gov. J. Millard Tawes, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Dec. 7 at his Crisfield home. He was 85. Mr. Tawes, who was born and raised in Crisfield, was also the son of the late Avalynne Gibson Tawes. He was a 1939 graduate of Crisfield High School and left the University of Maryland to enlist in the Army during World War II. He served with Company L 1229th Division from Crisfield and landed at Normandy, France, on June 12, 1944.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2005
C. Keating Bowie, a retired Baltimore corporate lawyer and former chairman of the board of trustees of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, died of cancer yesterday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 92. Mr. Bowie was born in Baltimore, the son of a lawyer, and was raised on Calvert Street and in Guilford. He was a 1932 graduate of Gilman School and earned a bachelor's degree in economics in 1936 from Princeton University. After graduating from Harvard Law School in 1939, Mr. Bowie returned to Baltimore and joined Bowie and Burke, his father's law firm, which later became Bowie, Burke and Leonard.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2003
RICHARD C. Mike Lewin was anxious in October 2000 when he joined Gov. Parris N. Glendening for a lobster lunch at Government House, the rust-brick Georgian home of the governor in Annapolis. The Nasdaq stock market had plunged more than 30 percent, from 5,049 to less than 3,500, during the previous six months. New high-tech companies such as Corvis Corp. and Aether Systems Inc., the economic fountains of youth expected to replace the shriveled smokestack employers, were showing vulnerabilities.
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