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Millard Fillmore

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By THEO LIPPMAN JR | January 8, 1992
SPEAKING OF Martin Van Buren, as I did here Saturday, happy birthday, Millard Fillmore! Yesterday was the 13th president's 192nd birthday.As usual, the Society to Promote Respect and Recognition for Millard Fillmore honored his memory here, this time with a mock exhumation performed by Evening Sun columnist Dan Rodricks. Also, the society's Rae Rossen used the occasion to call upon President Bush to mention Fillmore while in Japan, a visit Bush might not have been able to make but for Millard.
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NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,Special to The Sun | May 6, 2007
In the preface to his new book, The Remarkable Millard Fillmore, George Pendle recalls his first visit to the Biographers Club in Washington 30 years ago. He was approached by Carl Sandburg, who, when informed that Pendle was planning a Fillmore biography, loudly berated him, saying Fillmore wasn't worth a biography. Stunned, Pendle was "about to retreat when Arthur Schlesinger Jr. crept up behind me and, grabbing the top of my underpants, hoisted them halfway up my back." And off we go for a huge "factual" nonsense.
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NEWS
By NEIL A. GRAUER | February 4, 1993
The demise of Sears, Roebuck and Company's fabled, 97-year-oldgeneral-merchandise catalog causes personal regret, not just because it was a rich piece of Americana but because it once provided desperately needed employment for a down-on-their-luck Baltimore family -- mine -- by making my great-grandfather the star model in a before-and-after advertisement for toupees.Born in Baltimore in 1856, my great-grandfather was named Millard Fillmore Grauer (hold the snickers, please). The year 1856 was when former President Fillmore ran for the White House again as a candidate of the Know Nothing Party and carried only one state: Maryland.
NEWS
By Randal C. Archibold and Randal C. Archibold,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2001
BUFFALO, N.Y. - It is hard for outsiders to imagine that before the steel mills died, the young people fled and the Bills choked, Buffalo was unbowed and proud. This was once the eighth largest city in the United States and one of its most prosperous, with mansions and parks designed by the best architects in the country. Its geography, on Lake Erie, and its crisscross railroad lines made it a pivotal hub for moving goods from the Midwest to the East. Its political influence was strong enough that two sons went to the White House: Grover Cleveland (1885-1889, 1893-1897)
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 17, 1992
LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. -- He may not get any respect from historians, but an estate sale for a man known as the "The Rodney Dangerfield of presidents" has fans from across the country clamoring for a piece of Millard G. Fillmore.Flying here this week will be a range of collectors, from scholars to a group of almost cult-like followers of the 13th president, who is seen by some historians as one of the most ineffective chief executives in the nation's history.The estate sale Friday and Saturday has people excited because it is one of the rare occasions when the public will have an opportunity to purchase presidential belongings.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | January 2, 1991
NOW THAT THE new year has begun, why not start it off by becoming a culture vulture and checking out some of the art exhibits opening tomorrow during First Thursdays along Charles Street?One shop that may be of interest to commercial art lovers is Cartuche, which is featuring the show, "Cartoons, Drawings and Illustrations." Artists include Evening Sun cartoonist Mike Lane, painter Charlene Rene Clark, illustrator Lynne Lockhart and illustrator Robert Gow Henneberger, who was the youngest student to be admitted to the Maryland Institute of Art at the age of 8 in 1929.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,Special to The Sun | May 6, 2007
In the preface to his new book, The Remarkable Millard Fillmore, George Pendle recalls his first visit to the Biographers Club in Washington 30 years ago. He was approached by Carl Sandburg, who, when informed that Pendle was planning a Fillmore biography, loudly berated him, saying Fillmore wasn't worth a biography. Stunned, Pendle was "about to retreat when Arthur Schlesinger Jr. crept up behind me and, grabbing the top of my underpants, hoisted them halfway up my back." And off we go for a huge "factual" nonsense.
NEWS
April 8, 1991
Schaefer's contributions often ignoredThere's been good news and bad news about Gov. William Donald Schaefer. The trivial bad news - about his impatience, intensity and sensitivities is featured repeatedly in the media. The good news is either subordinated or ignored, although it affects our daily lives.As mayor, governor and patriot, Schaefer is good news. He organized and rallied this city's leadership behind its spectacular rebirth and was the guiding spirit behind the internationally celebrated Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Randal C. Archibold and Randal C. Archibold,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2001
BUFFALO, N.Y. - It is hard for outsiders to imagine that before the steel mills died, the young people fled and the Bills choked, Buffalo was unbowed and proud. This was once the eighth largest city in the United States and one of its most prosperous, with mansions and parks designed by the best architects in the country. Its geography, on Lake Erie, and its crisscross railroad lines made it a pivotal hub for moving goods from the Midwest to the East. Its political influence was strong enough that two sons went to the White House: Grover Cleveland (1885-1889, 1893-1897)
FEATURES
July 10, 1999
Today in history: July 10In 1850, Vice President Millard Fillmore assumed the presidency, following the death of President Taylor.In 1890, Wyoming became the 44th state.In 1919, President Wilson personally delivered the Treaty of Versailles to the Senate, and urged its ratification.In 1925, the official news agency of the Soviet Union, TASS, was established.In 1940, during World War II, the 114-day Battle of Britain began as Nazi forces began attacking southern England by air.In 1943, during World War II, U.S. and British forces invaded Sicily.
NEWS
By NEIL A. GRAUER | February 4, 1993
The demise of Sears, Roebuck and Company's fabled, 97-year-oldgeneral-merchandise catalog causes personal regret, not just because it was a rich piece of Americana but because it once provided desperately needed employment for a down-on-their-luck Baltimore family -- mine -- by making my great-grandfather the star model in a before-and-after advertisement for toupees.Born in Baltimore in 1856, my great-grandfather was named Millard Fillmore Grauer (hold the snickers, please). The year 1856 was when former President Fillmore ran for the White House again as a candidate of the Know Nothing Party and carried only one state: Maryland.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 17, 1992
LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. -- He may not get any respect from historians, but an estate sale for a man known as the "The Rodney Dangerfield of presidents" has fans from across the country clamoring for a piece of Millard G. Fillmore.Flying here this week will be a range of collectors, from scholars to a group of almost cult-like followers of the 13th president, who is seen by some historians as one of the most ineffective chief executives in the nation's history.The estate sale Friday and Saturday has people excited because it is one of the rare occasions when the public will have an opportunity to purchase presidential belongings.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | January 8, 1992
SPEAKING OF Martin Van Buren, as I did here Saturday, happy birthday, Millard Fillmore! Yesterday was the 13th president's 192nd birthday.As usual, the Society to Promote Respect and Recognition for Millard Fillmore honored his memory here, this time with a mock exhumation performed by Evening Sun columnist Dan Rodricks. Also, the society's Rae Rossen used the occasion to call upon President Bush to mention Fillmore while in Japan, a visit Bush might not have been able to make but for Millard.
NEWS
April 8, 1991
Schaefer's contributions often ignoredThere's been good news and bad news about Gov. William Donald Schaefer. The trivial bad news - about his impatience, intensity and sensitivities is featured repeatedly in the media. The good news is either subordinated or ignored, although it affects our daily lives.As mayor, governor and patriot, Schaefer is good news. He organized and rallied this city's leadership behind its spectacular rebirth and was the guiding spirit behind the internationally celebrated Inner Harbor.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | January 2, 1991
NOW THAT THE new year has begun, why not start it off by becoming a culture vulture and checking out some of the art exhibits opening tomorrow during First Thursdays along Charles Street?One shop that may be of interest to commercial art lovers is Cartuche, which is featuring the show, "Cartoons, Drawings and Illustrations." Artists include Evening Sun cartoonist Mike Lane, painter Charlene Rene Clark, illustrator Lynne Lockhart and illustrator Robert Gow Henneberger, who was the youngest student to be admitted to the Maryland Institute of Art at the age of 8 in 1929.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | September 16, 1992
This is the 52nd presidential election.The 18th was held in 1856. It was a tumultuous time. The Whig Party had elected two of the last four presidents, but it found itself riven and reduced to its last gasping breaths by the most volatile issue in American political history, slavery. The Democrats had a problem with this, too. Southern based, the party was strongly pro-slavery. It supported extending slavery into the Western territories. Many Whigs and some Democrats in the North and Midwest switched to the new anti-slavery Republican Party.
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