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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
Charles Wagandt is waiting patiently. When he stepped up nearly 40 years ago to help rescue a town whose very existence was being threatened, recession certainly wasn't on his mind. But now, the nation's sluggish economy is his primary foe as he waits for the downturn to lift so he can finally complete his promise to Oella. For his decades-long efforts to breathe new life into the historic village that dates to 1808, Wagandt was named one of four 2011 Preservationists of the Year last week by Preservation Howard County.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
If Santa Claus had ever contemplated expanding his toy-making empire from the North Pole to a more strategic hub closer to the nation's capital, he might have found the mill town of Savage to his liking in 1948. That was the promotional gimmick that a Baltimore businessman was betting on when he decided to remake Savage into "Santa's Maryland home" by converting the 150-year-old cotton mill to the manufacture of ornaments, and transforming the town into a working Christmas village.
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BUSINESS
By James Gallo and James Gallo,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
Residents of Phoenix, in northern Baltimore County, have watched the area change during recent years as homeowners who can afford it move to this picturesque setting of horse farms and open land. Though still considered a rural suburb of Baltimore, the area is growing. Steuart Hihn of Long & Foster Real Estate Inc.'s Phoenix office, an area resident, says the community has become a mix of old and new homes during the past few years. As more people seek the peace and quiet of a rural community and can afford the spiraling prices of the large homes there, Phoenix continues to grow.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
The recent publication of Elmer J. Hall's "A Mill on the Point: One Hundred and Twenty-Five Years of Steelmaking at Sparrows Point, Maryland," marks the last of his quartet of books chronicling the work and social history of the once heavily industrialized eastern Baltimore County peninsula. His earlier books include "Diary of a Mill Town: Recollections of the Bungalows and Sparrows Point, Maryland," "Shipbuilding at the Sparrows Point Yard: A Century of Pride and Tradition," and "The Patapsco and Back Rivers Railroad: Chronicles of the Push, Bump and Ram. " Hall is a retired Baltimore County public school educator and Sparrows Point native who grew up in the Bungalows, the now-demolished company town neighborhood.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1996
Historic Ellicott City is in the midst of an identity crisis.Will the former mill town remain the quaint boutique district it has been since the late 1970s -- or will it become a party haven, like Fells Point or downtown Annapolis?The latter possibility has some restaurant owners worried, especially in light of the liquor licenses granted Thursday to a prospective restaurant and brew pub in the historic district."People are treating Ellicott City like a field of dreams," said George "Buzz" Suter, owner of Judge's Bench restaurant on Main Street.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 24, 1995
METHUEN, Mass. -- For those who see the world as increasingly selfish, for those who say believing in goodwill toward man will just break your heart: Look to this depressed old mill town, where a factory fire two weeks ago left 2,400 workers fearing a bitter Christmas -- until their boss showed them real holiday spirit.His name is Aaron Feuerstein, a wiry, gray-haired man who studied philosophy in college, jogs every morning, eats in the mill cafeteria and believes in keeping promises.In Methuen, Mr. Feuerstein, 70, a devout member of his Brookline synagogue, is a Christmas hero.
NEWS
By Sally Voris and Sally Voris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 1998
DANIELS -- the mill town that thrived about five miles upriver from Ellicott City -- lost one of its strongest enthusiasts when William Thomas Webb died last month at 85.Bill Webb had been leader of the Daniels Band since the early 1930s, except for a few years during World War II. He insisted that the band play "what people want to hear."Webb's father served as volunteer librarian weekday evenings at the local community hall, where the band practiced. Some horns had been left in the hall one night in 1925 -- the year Bill Webb started high school -- and he picked one up and started playing.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 29, 2006
Florence M. Eichler, who is thought to be the last known surviving resident of Warren, a now-vanished Baltimore County mill town, died in her sleep Monday at Catered Living of Cockeysville, an assisted-living facility. She was 103. Florence Marian Brown, who was known as Marian, was born on her family's Shawan Road farm. She moved in 1914 to the nearby town of Warren, when her father took a job at the Warren Manufacturing Co. operating the boiler of the five-story textile mill. The mill, several miles east of Cockeysville along the Gunpowder Falls, had been established in 1814 by Summerfield Baldwin and was noted for two products: cotton duck and silk.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
North Baltimore residents are exploring another way to block a proposed development of cottages and townhouses: convince historic preservationists that their neighborhood should be designated an old mill town and hope this forces city officials to think twice about the plan.The option emerged yesterday as community leaders in Lake Falls and Poplar Hill continued voicing concerns over a plan by Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse, Inc. to develop 9 acres of woods just east of Falls Road, below the Baltimore County line.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Breitenbach and Sarah Breitenbach,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
It's only minutes from anywhere you might want to go in Philadelphia, but Manayunk, Pa., couldn't be any further from a modern metropolitan area. Originally a 19th-century mill town, Manayunk has turned into a bustling residential and business community that has managed to retain its small-town America atmosphere even though it sits on the outskirts of America's first city. In the town, where skinny rowhouses line narrow streets, real estate is going faster than developers can build. Kay Smith, executive director of the Manayunk Development Corp.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
"Gone, but not forgotten" is the nostalgic slogan adopted by organizers of Discover Daniels Day, a one-time event Saturday that will mark 40 years since the last remnants of the town of Daniels were demolished by Tropical Storm Agnes. Haven't heard of Daniels? You're not alone. The picturesque and bustling mill town, with manufacturing roots dating to the early 19th century, was located four miles north of Ellicott City at a bend in the Patapsco River and straddled the northeastern Howard County border into Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2012
Elmer Hall grew up in a small town with tree-lined streets, stores, churches and schools - and the largest steel mill in the world, which ran it all. Now that company town exists only in photographs and memories. Forty years ago, the then-owner of the Sparrows Point complex in Baltimore County began demolishing bungalows, rowhouses and everything else to make way for a massive blast furnace that still stands today. On Saturday, Hall and hundreds of other former residents gathered near the mill to see each other again - and to remember when work and life were intimately intertwined.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
Steel from Sparrows Point built the Golden Gate Bridge, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, hundreds of ships for World War II and livelihoods for tens of thousands of Baltimore-area families. The story of the massive steel mill follows the arc of American manufacturing — rapid ascent, years of dominance, a generation of shrinking employment and decline. In the last dozen years, the mill has had five owners, two bankruptcies and many furloughs. Last week came a stark warning that the final chapter in its 125-year history could be at hand.
EXPLORE
By Norma Bosley | March 5, 2012
Teachers do not teach for the money; they teach for the love of learning and for making a difference in the life of a child. When one is recognized for excellence, it is an added bonus and a pleasant surprise. Such is the case with Marcella Upshur-Dudley, a science teacher at New Town High School. She was one of 51 educators nationwide to receive an Endeavor Fellowship with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This fellowship will allow her to work on earning a STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics)
EXPLORE
By Louise Vest | February 11, 2012
100 Years Ago Spirit and kick "Misses Lillian Schultz and Mary Merceron attended one of the performances of "Ben Hur" at the New Academy of Music. Mr. and Mrs. Howard Rider and daughter of "Sherwood," have been visiting Mrs. H. Newton De Vries. Mrs. W.K. Marshall has been indisposed with a cold for several days. Mr. J. Brooke Mellow of Baltimore recently visited at his fathers' Mr. E.M. Mellor, Sr. Miss Clara Elizabeth Selby has been quite ill with appendictis in Baltimore.
EXPLORE
By Sara Toth | October 4, 2011
History and present day are interwoven along the train tracks of the old B&O Railroad in Ellicott City. The ruins of Hell House, an old seminary, and the railroad itself are full of stories, and Columbia writer Jamie Wasserman has added one more tale to the list. Wasserman, 37, capitalizes on the haunting, magical qualities of the historic mill town in his book “Blood and Sunlight: A Maryland Vampire Story.” A fan of vampire lore long before the phenomenon of Stephenie Meyer's  “Twilight” series, Wasserman saw his story as a way to bring together two things he loved dearly: the vampire mythology and his teenage stomping grounds of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
"Gone, but not forgotten" is the nostalgic slogan adopted by organizers of Discover Daniels Day, a one-time event Saturday that will mark 40 years since the last remnants of the town of Daniels were demolished by Tropical Storm Agnes. Haven't heard of Daniels? You're not alone. The picturesque and bustling mill town, with manufacturing roots dating to the early 19th century, was located four miles north of Ellicott City at a bend in the Patapsco River and straddled the northeastern Howard County border into Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
If Santa Claus had ever contemplated expanding his toy-making empire from the North Pole to a more strategic hub closer to the nation's capital, he might have found the mill town of Savage to his liking in 1948. That was the promotional gimmick that a Baltimore businessman was betting on when he decided to remake Savage into "Santa's Maryland home" by converting the 150-year-old cotton mill to the manufacture of ornaments, and transforming the town into a working Christmas village.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
Charles Wagandt is waiting patiently. When he stepped up nearly 40 years ago to help rescue a town whose very existence was being threatened, recession certainly wasn't on his mind. But now, the nation's sluggish economy is his primary foe as he waits for the downturn to lift so he can finally complete his promise to Oella. For his decades-long efforts to breathe new life into the historic village that dates to 1808, Wagandt was named one of four 2011 Preservationists of the Year last week by Preservation Howard County.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,sun reporter | May 18, 2008
The only thing missing from Owings Mills New Town is the lake. Back in the 1980s, the developers' vision for the newly designated growth area in Owings Mills included a man-made lake. When an Army Corps of Engineers study concluded the lake would have a negative environmental impact, not only did it cancel plans for the lake, it also killed the community's original name: Lakeside. However, the central road through the area had already been dedicated, so today New Town residents traverse Lakeside Boulevard to get to their homes and to visit shops.
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