Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMilky Way Galaxy
IN THE NEWS

Milky Way Galaxy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2000
After a bumpy start, a Johns Hopkins-based orbiting observatory has begun to send back important new findings on the life cycles of stars and galaxies. Scientists working with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite told astronomers meeting in Atlanta yesterday they have found clouds of hot gas surrounding our Milky Way galaxy, blown there by the explosions of dying stars. FUSE has also given astronomers their first look at the vast, wispy clouds of cold molecular hydrogen -- the raw material for new stars -- long-supposed to float throughout the Milky Way. "The FUSE observatory is now open for routine business," said Hopkins physics professor H. Warren Moos, principal FUSE investigator.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
First, the bad news: The Andromeda galaxy, an agglomeration of 1 trillion stars that is visible to the naked eye, is hurtling through space at 250,000 miles per hour — and it's coming right at us. What's more, NASA astronomers in Baltimore said Thursday, while Andromeda barrels into our Milky Way, a companion galaxy will join in what the space agency is billing as a "titanic collision. " Now, the good news: With Andromeda still 2.5 million light years away, the collision won't take place for another 4 billion years, the astronomers said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | March 3, 2006
A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope reveals the vast Pinwheel galaxy in such spectacular detail that astronomers have catalogued 3,000 new star clusters visible in its spiral arms. The composite photograph, released this week, is one of the largest and most detailed images of a spiral galaxy ever published, measuring 12,000 by 16,000 pixels. (By comparison, a 3.1 megapixel camera produces images that measure 2,048 by 1,536 pixels.) The Pinwheel galaxy, or M101, sparkles with hot blue clusters of newborn stars.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Reporter | September 8, 2006
Calling it "the best news any Pluto fan could hope for," scientists working on NASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto have been cheered this month by the first images from their spacecraft's high-resolution camera. All seven instruments on the mission - the one intended to produce the first close look at the "dwarf planet" in 2015 - have proven they are working as expected. The fastest spacecraft ever built, New Horizons is 322 million miles from the sun, moving through the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter at 14.45 miles per second.
NEWS
September 28, 1994
IT SOUNDS like something that lives in Australia and carries its offspring about in unorthodox fashion. But astronomers report that a Dwingeloo is actually a distant cosmic cousin to our own Milky Way galaxy, a previously undiscovered spiral disc of a billion or so stars lurking just out of sight behind the clouds of dust and gas that swirl around our island universe.Dubbed Dwingeloo 1, the new galaxy was detected last month with the large radio telescope in Dwingeloo, The Netherlands, by a team of Dutch, British and American astronomers.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Reporter | September 8, 2006
Calling it "the best news any Pluto fan could hope for," scientists working on NASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto have been cheered this month by the first images from their spacecraft's high-resolution camera. All seven instruments on the mission - the one intended to produce the first close look at the "dwarf planet" in 2015 - have proven they are working as expected. The fastest spacecraft ever built, New Horizons is 322 million miles from the sun, moving through the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter at 14.45 miles per second.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1998
Our Milky Way galaxy has a companion. It's a dwarf. And a tough one at that.Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist Rosemary Wyse says a cigar-shaped "dwarf spheroidal galaxy," one-tenth the diameter of the Milky Way, has been orbiting our galactic home for 10 billion years.This galaxy -- dubbed the "Sagittarius dwarf galaxy" -- has been diving right through the Milky Way's swirling disk of stars during each billion-year orbit, she said.It has survived the plunges without its stars being swept up by the Milky Way's huge gravitational forces.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - Scientists say they have found new evidence that spiral galaxies such as our own Milky Way are surrounded by halos of hot gas fed by bubbles and fountains of exhaust from stellar explosions. Over millions of years, the gas cools and rains back down into the galaxy, providing the raw material for the next cycle of star birth. The findings, reported this week to the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society, were based on data gathered by the orbiting Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer telescope, known as FUSE, built and operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
Dramatic new photographs from the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed the stellar fireworks at the heart of a galactic smashup.The views of the colliding Antennae galaxies are yielding clues to the formation and evolution of galaxies and the origins of globular star clusters that have long puzzled astronomers.And, with the nearby Andromeda galaxy headed in our direction, said Hubble astronomer Dr. Bradley Whitmore, "we might be looking at what the future fate is for our own Milky Way galaxy."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1997
We think we know our sun. It hangs up there like some blinding, solitary jewel in a plain blue setting.It's easy to forget that it's really a blazing star, one of millions in our region of the spiraling Milky Way Galaxy. Its ferocious thermonuclear furnace boils and thrashes against a backdrop as black and star-spangled as the winter sky on a cold, clear, country night.Now, solar physicist Guenter Brueckner of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory has produced a video that for the first time shows our sun in its natural, starry habitat, flinging ionized gas -- the solar wind -- into space and even swallowing an errant comet.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | March 3, 2006
A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope reveals the vast Pinwheel galaxy in such spectacular detail that astronomers have catalogued 3,000 new star clusters visible in its spiral arms. The composite photograph, released this week, is one of the largest and most detailed images of a spiral galaxy ever published, measuring 12,000 by 16,000 pixels. (By comparison, a 3.1 megapixel camera produces images that measure 2,048 by 1,536 pixels.) The Pinwheel galaxy, or M101, sparkles with hot blue clusters of newborn stars.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
By studying traces of ancient starlight, astronomers are gaining a better understanding of how the infant universe took shape - a step toward answering questions about the nature of space, time and energy as defined by Einstein's theories. But the deeper in space that scientists try to probe, the murkier things become. Even with ever-improving technology, the oldest stars are still too distant to observe directly. In probing this and other enigmatic phenomena, astronomers often make assumptions based on what the latest instruments reveal.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - Scientists say they have found new evidence that spiral galaxies such as our own Milky Way are surrounded by halos of hot gas fed by bubbles and fountains of exhaust from stellar explosions. Over millions of years, the gas cools and rains back down into the galaxy, providing the raw material for the next cycle of star birth. The findings, reported this week to the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society, were based on data gathered by the orbiting Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer telescope, known as FUSE, built and operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2000
After a bumpy start, a Johns Hopkins-based orbiting observatory has begun to send back important new findings on the life cycles of stars and galaxies. Scientists working with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite told astronomers meeting in Atlanta yesterday they have found clouds of hot gas surrounding our Milky Way galaxy, blown there by the explosions of dying stars. FUSE has also given astronomers their first look at the vast, wispy clouds of cold molecular hydrogen -- the raw material for new stars -- long-supposed to float throughout the Milky Way. "The FUSE observatory is now open for routine business," said Hopkins physics professor H. Warren Moos, principal FUSE investigator.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1998
Our Milky Way galaxy has a companion. It's a dwarf. And a tough one at that.Johns Hopkins University astrophysicist Rosemary Wyse says a cigar-shaped "dwarf spheroidal galaxy," one-tenth the diameter of the Milky Way, has been orbiting our galactic home for 10 billion years.This galaxy -- dubbed the "Sagittarius dwarf galaxy" -- has been diving right through the Milky Way's swirling disk of stars during each billion-year orbit, she said.It has survived the plunges without its stars being swept up by the Milky Way's huge gravitational forces.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
Dramatic new photographs from the Hubble Space Telescope have revealed the stellar fireworks at the heart of a galactic smashup.The views of the colliding Antennae galaxies are yielding clues to the formation and evolution of galaxies and the origins of globular star clusters that have long puzzled astronomers.And, with the nearby Andromeda galaxy headed in our direction, said Hubble astronomer Dr. Bradley Whitmore, "we might be looking at what the future fate is for our own Milky Way galaxy."
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
By studying traces of ancient starlight, astronomers are gaining a better understanding of how the infant universe took shape - a step toward answering questions about the nature of space, time and energy as defined by Einstein's theories. But the deeper in space that scientists try to probe, the murkier things become. Even with ever-improving technology, the oldest stars are still too distant to observe directly. In probing this and other enigmatic phenomena, astronomers often make assumptions based on what the latest instruments reveal.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
First, the bad news: The Andromeda galaxy, an agglomeration of 1 trillion stars that is visible to the naked eye, is hurtling through space at 250,000 miles per hour — and it's coming right at us. What's more, NASA astronomers in Baltimore said Thursday, while Andromeda barrels into our Milky Way, a companion galaxy will join in what the space agency is billing as a "titanic collision. " Now, the good news: With Andromeda still 2.5 million light years away, the collision won't take place for another 4 billion years, the astronomers said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
Writers love antimatter.Star Trek screenwriters used it to fuel their TV starships and spike their plots. A screw shakes loose somewhere, threatening to free the antimatter fuel and annihilate our regular-matter heroes.An editorial writer once used matter and antimatter as a simile for two apparently contradictory realities that nevertheless exist side by side -- specifically, a booming economy and the average American's money worries.A TV critic used antimatter to power a metaphor for C-SPAN -- that cable TV channel devoted to long speeches no matter how long, or how few are watching.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1997
We think we know our sun. It hangs up there like some blinding, solitary jewel in a plain blue setting.It's easy to forget that it's really a blazing star, one of millions in our region of the spiraling Milky Way Galaxy. Its ferocious thermonuclear furnace boils and thrashes against a backdrop as black and star-spangled as the winter sky on a cold, clear, country night.Now, solar physicist Guenter Brueckner of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory has produced a video that for the first time shows our sun in its natural, starry habitat, flinging ionized gas -- the solar wind -- into space and even swallowing an errant comet.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.