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By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | October 20, 1991
Q: I am interested in collecting old milk bottles and related items such as openers, caps, dairy advertisements, signs, toy milk wagons, trucks, miniature bottles, etc. Where can I find more, and are there any clubs, books, publications or other sources for collectors?A: The National Association of Milk Bottle Collectors offers an annual membership and monthly newsletter for $15, or $2 for a current issue, from 4 Ox Bow Road, Westport, Conn. 06880. Creamers, a quarterly newsletter devoted to the collecting of individual glass creamers marked with dairy names that once were used in restaurants, is available for $4 a year or $1 a back issue, from Lloyd Bindscheattle, Box 11, Lake Villa, Ill. 60046.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
History's throwaways and discards emerged as coveted attractions Sunday when bottles, vials and flasks that spent decades buried in dumps and privies returned in translucent glory. Billed as the "largest one-day bottle show in the world," the Baltimore Bottle Club's 33rd annual sale and exhibit, held in Essex, drew container connoisseurs who didn't flip a cork over paying $750 for a rare cobalt-blue poison bottle produced at Carr-Lowrey, a factory on the Middle Branch of the Patapsco in Westport.
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NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | February 23, 1994
Washington. -- Wouldn't it be nice to return to the days when families put a milk bottle on the porch with money in it, certain that only the milkman would take it? The problem is that when we put our money in the milk bottle, America didn't have millions of youngsters who were largely bereft of parental supervision.Children's ''churches'' were not street gangs. Their most trusted companion was not a revolver, and our streets didn't bristle with 211 million handguns.Americans now are vulnerable to a special hysteria about crime, because they don't know how to restore the tranquillity of a half-century ago, and they can't bring themselves to banish the pistols.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 5, 2006
In the 1920s, the Will's Dairy in Fells Point sold pasteurized milk in short, half-pint glass bottles embossed with an upbeat slogan: "Will's on milk is like Sterling on silver." Inside the Fells Point Time Bubble, a new interactive exhibit at the Fells Point Maritime Museum, one of the dairy's bottles -- clear, filled no longer with milk but with white Styrofoam pellets to accentuate its red lettering -- sits waiting to tell the story of a man whose spirit helped make the waterfront community what it is today.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
From the curves and etchings, the raised patterns and letters of an old milk bottle, Bill Mueller can draw an outline of history.In one bottle, he can find the story of a typhoid outbreak at the Naval Academy in 1910 attributed to bad milk that prompted officials to open their own dairy. In the amber-colored glass of another is the tale of marketing techniques -- the glass made the milk look creamier."A lot of these bottles, if they could talk, would sure have a story to tell," says Mr. Mueller, a Crownsville postal carrier who has amassed a collection of more than 1,500 bottles.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
History's throwaways and discards emerged as coveted attractions Sunday when bottles, vials and flasks that spent decades buried in dumps and privies returned in translucent glory. Billed as the "largest one-day bottle show in the world," the Baltimore Bottle Club's 33rd annual sale and exhibit, held in Essex, drew container connoisseurs who didn't flip a cork over paying $750 for a rare cobalt-blue poison bottle produced at Carr-Lowrey, a factory on the Middle Branch of the Patapsco in Westport.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 9, 1998
LET'S CALL IT Sonny's World. You enter it when you cross the threshold of a home in the Southwest Baltimore community of Carroll. It is a world that takes you back to a time when bottle-making was an art, when a Coke cost 5 cents and milk was measured in gills.Sonny's World -- not an official name but as good a name as any for this collection -- got its start 30 years ago, when James "Sonny" Johnson went to a flea market on North Point Road."I saw a lady I knew with her son, Lawrence Smith," Johnson recalled.
FEATURES
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | August 8, 1994
They're round, inexpensive and have an unusual name. But Christopher and Jason Orem of Columbia have flipped for POGs.For the unacquainted, POGs are silver dollar-size milk bottle caps that children play with, collect or trade. Usually two to six players stack the same number of the cardboard caps face-up in a pile and use a heavier cap -- called a slammer or kinni -- to pummel the stack. The player with the most flipped-over caps wins."I play almost every day for half an hour or hour," 11-year-old Jason says.
NEWS
November 28, 1992
AS President-elect Clinton ponders the implications of hi campaign threat to cancel normal trading relations with China unless Beijing improves its human rights record, he should read a passage in the memoirs, entitled "Hard Choices," by Cyrus Vance, President Carter's secretary of state.Mr. Vance reveals that no one high in the Carter administration with the exception of national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski and the president himself wanted to stick with his campaign vow to pull U.S. troops out of South Korea.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 7, 1993
ROBERT MICHEL, the House minority leader, who announced this week that he'll retire at the end of this term, is a perfect example of what conservative Republicans like him say is wrong with Congress. He's been around a lo-o-o-ng time.He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1956, took the oath of office on Jan. 3, 1957. So here's a quiz for you: When he retires on Jan. 4, 1995, how long will he have served in the House?The answer is 45 years! Trick question! For seven years before he was elected to the House, he was the administrative assistant to the representative from the same Illinois district, the Red-scare demagogue Harold Velde.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 9, 1998
LET'S CALL IT Sonny's World. You enter it when you cross the threshold of a home in the Southwest Baltimore community of Carroll. It is a world that takes you back to a time when bottle-making was an art, when a Coke cost 5 cents and milk was measured in gills.Sonny's World -- not an official name but as good a name as any for this collection -- got its start 30 years ago, when James "Sonny" Johnson went to a flea market on North Point Road."I saw a lady I knew with her son, Lawrence Smith," Johnson recalled.
FEATURES
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | August 8, 1994
They're round, inexpensive and have an unusual name. But Christopher and Jason Orem of Columbia have flipped for POGs.For the unacquainted, POGs are silver dollar-size milk bottle caps that children play with, collect or trade. Usually two to six players stack the same number of the cardboard caps face-up in a pile and use a heavier cap -- called a slammer or kinni -- to pummel the stack. The player with the most flipped-over caps wins."I play almost every day for half an hour or hour," 11-year-old Jason says.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | February 23, 1994
Washington. -- Wouldn't it be nice to return to the days when families put a milk bottle on the porch with money in it, certain that only the milkman would take it? The problem is that when we put our money in the milk bottle, America didn't have millions of youngsters who were largely bereft of parental supervision.Children's ''churches'' were not street gangs. Their most trusted companion was not a revolver, and our streets didn't bristle with 211 million handguns.Americans now are vulnerable to a special hysteria about crime, because they don't know how to restore the tranquillity of a half-century ago, and they can't bring themselves to banish the pistols.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 7, 1993
ROBERT MICHEL, the House minority leader, who announced this week that he'll retire at the end of this term, is a perfect example of what conservative Republicans like him say is wrong with Congress. He's been around a lo-o-o-ng time.He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1956, took the oath of office on Jan. 3, 1957. So here's a quiz for you: When he retires on Jan. 4, 1995, how long will he have served in the House?The answer is 45 years! Trick question! For seven years before he was elected to the House, he was the administrative assistant to the representative from the same Illinois district, the Red-scare demagogue Harold Velde.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | February 4, 1993
From the curves and etchings, the raised patterns and letters of an old milk bottle, Bill Mueller can draw an outline of history.In one bottle, he can find the story of a typhoid outbreak at the Naval Academy in 1910 attributed to bad milk that prompted officials to open their own dairy. In the amber-colored glass of another is the tale of marketing techniques -- the glass made the milk look creamier."A lot of these bottles, if they could talk, would sure have a story to tell," says Mr. Mueller, a Crownsville postal carrier who has amassed a collection of more than 1,500 bottles.
NEWS
November 28, 1992
AS President-elect Clinton ponders the implications of hi campaign threat to cancel normal trading relations with China unless Beijing improves its human rights record, he should read a passage in the memoirs, entitled "Hard Choices," by Cyrus Vance, President Carter's secretary of state.Mr. Vance reveals that no one high in the Carter administration with the exception of national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski and the president himself wanted to stick with his campaign vow to pull U.S. troops out of South Korea.
NEWS
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | February 5, 2006
In the 1920s, the Will's Dairy in Fells Point sold pasteurized milk in short, half-pint glass bottles embossed with an upbeat slogan: "Will's on milk is like Sterling on silver." Inside the Fells Point Time Bubble, a new interactive exhibit at the Fells Point Maritime Museum, one of the dairy's bottles -- clear, filled no longer with milk but with white Styrofoam pellets to accentuate its red lettering -- sits waiting to tell the story of a man whose spirit helped make the waterfront community what it is today.
NEWS
June 27, 2002
Georgia Ridder, 87, a thoroughbred horse owner and the widow of newspaper publisher B.J. "Ben" Ridder, died June 14 in Pasadena, Calif. The couple began racing thoroughbreds in the late 1950s. Their biggest win came in 1996, when Alphabet Soup, a long-shot gray colt, beat Cigar, the reigning horse of the year, in the $4 million Breeders' Cup Classic in Toronto. The Ridders moved from Long Island, N.Y., to California in 1955 when B.J. Ridder became publisher of the Pasadena Independent & Star News, the predecessor of today's Pasadena Star-News.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | October 20, 1991
Q: I am interested in collecting old milk bottles and related items such as openers, caps, dairy advertisements, signs, toy milk wagons, trucks, miniature bottles, etc. Where can I find more, and are there any clubs, books, publications or other sources for collectors?A: The National Association of Milk Bottle Collectors offers an annual membership and monthly newsletter for $15, or $2 for a current issue, from 4 Ox Bow Road, Westport, Conn. 06880. Creamers, a quarterly newsletter devoted to the collecting of individual glass creamers marked with dairy names that once were used in restaurants, is available for $4 a year or $1 a back issue, from Lloyd Bindscheattle, Box 11, Lake Villa, Ill. 60046.
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