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NEWS
January 7, 2013
A frequent bugaboo of the fiscal cliff debacle was the "milk cliff" - the threat of milk price doubling if Congress failed to extend dairy subsidies. Parents were expected to forgo other necessities because their children "had to have milk. " Most industries would gladly give up their tax loopholes for that kind of product loyalty. But this one is totally undeserved. Consumption of dairy products, laden with saturated fats, cholesterol, hormones, and drugs, elevates the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 14, 2014
Inner city kids appear to suffer more from food allergies than the general population, according to new research lead by Johns Hopkins Children's Center . Researchers had already found that kids in four large cities are more vulnerable to asthma and environmental allergies. The new findings, which were published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , show 10 percent of the kids were allergic to milk, eggs or peanuts, the three most common food allergens. Just six percent of kids nationally are allergic to these foods, according to National Institute of Health estimates.
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FEATURES
August 7, 1991
* The form of milk with the most calories is whole-fat chocolate, with 230 calories per cup.* Whole milk has 150 to 160, depending on the brand.* Low-fat has 140, extra-light and most buttermilks have 120.* The low-cal winner is skim milk, with 90 calories.* Whole milk is about 3.5 percent fat. This equals nine grams per cup, five grams saturated, which translates into two teaspoons of fat.* The cholesterol count is 33 milligrams per cup for whole milk, 22 for low-fat and only four for nonfat.
HEALTH
By Charlotte Martin, For The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post is from dietetic intern Charlotte Martin. Gone are the days when milk came only from cows. Now you can make "milk" out of just about anything, from nuts to rice, even hemp. There are several reasons why one might choose a nondairy alternative over cow's milk, most commonly because of lactose intolerance or veganism. But with so many nondairy "milks" to choose from, it can be overwhelming perusing the milk section of the supermarket.
NEWS
March 10, 1995
Once again, Maryland's dairy industry is asking the General Assembly to create a state milk commission to lift dairy prices. Gov. Parris N. Glendening, who often speaks of the need for government to get out of the free market's way, has nevertheless endorsed this special interest legislation.Local dairy farmers complain that Pennsylvania and Virginia producers, supported by their milk commissions, are dumping excess product in Maryland and depressing raw milk prices here. A price support program in Maryland would help local dairy farmers remain in business, proponents say.A milk commission will not, however, solve dairy farmers' basic problem -- national overproduction of milk.
NEWS
By Asta Bowen | August 11, 1997
IT'S A RARE day that I measure milk. Most of the time I use whatever fills the cup or bowl, and when the carton is empty, it's empty. But last winter, while making a traditional family recipe that calls for careful measurement, the quart of milk I'd bought for the purpose came up short; the last cup was only three-quarters of a cup. Too slight a matter to warrant a formal complaint, I muttered a few traditional curses in the direction of the dairy and...
NEWS
March 21, 2004
IF MONEY is the milk of politics, the gambling industry is a veritable dairy. As state after state legalized gambling in the 1990s, political cups overflowed with gambling money. To a great degree, the industry gets what it wants - government-granted monopolies on huge revenue streams - by serving as a big and reliable source of campaign funds. In Maryland, according to a recent study by Common Cause, gambling interests have given almost $700,000 to politicians during the five years prior to January.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | November 14, 2011
The late FBI director J. Edgar Hoover would have hated director Clint Eastwood's new movie about him, but audiences are likely to be intrigued by it. Although "J. Edgar" does not realize its full dramatic potential, it's an ambitious attempt to get inside the mind of a man for whom secrecy was a professional attribute. During his long career, Eastwood's strength as a director has been his adherence to straightforward, deliberately paced storytelling that encourages actors to develop their characters in an incremental fashion.
NEWS
By Gholam Rahman and Gholam Rahman,Cox News Service | April 25, 2007
My niece is allergic to dairy products. Can I make Yorkshire pudding without milk, substituting maybe chicken broth? Originating in the Yorkshire region in the north of England, the pudding originally was made in the fat drippings from a roast beef and then served with gravy as part of a roast beef dinner. Mostly crust, it is raised by steam and eggs in a very hot oven, much like its American cousin, the popover. Although milk plays a part in the puffing up of the batter, I don't think its role is critical.
NEWS
April 2, 1993
For all the Little Leaguers emulating his batting stance, for all the adults who dream of his fame or his bankbook, not enough people apparently care to be like Cal Ripken Jr. in the milk-drinking department.Let's not lay this all at the feet of the Orioles' star and milk pitchman; he's got enough pressure. But for a host of reasons, from changing lifestyles to mixed medical advice, milk drinking ain't what it used to be.That certainly has a major impact on Carroll County, which just dropped from being No. 2 in Maryland milk production (behind Frederick County)
NEWS
December 10, 2013
Donna St. George reports in The Washington Post that the Montgomery County Public Schools have decided to address a serious hindrance to the education of students in that county: strawberry milk. In a move that seems to defy logic, the county has decided to take away strawberry milk:  Come January, school cafeterias in Montgomery County will be missing the pinkest offering of the lunch line. Strawberry-flavored milk is on its way out. St. George reports: "The drink is not as popular as chocolate milk and not as nutritious as plain milk, officials say. So at a time of growing concern about healthy foods for children, the pink milk has lost its place on refrigerated shelves in Maryland's largest school system.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
Steven Mangold and Christian Hwang were diagnosed with severe cow's milk allergies as young boys. Both initially fared well after months of experimental treatment at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center that exposed them gradually to more and more milk. Nearly three years later, Steven is still doing well. He can consume unlimited amounts of milk or dairy without a problem. The soon-to-be 11-year-old counts ice cream and tacos among his favorite foods. But Christian, who's 16, relapsed within a year of finishing his treatment in 2008 and has chosen to back away from milk, though he can tolerate it as an ingredient in cooked foods.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Zach Sparks | January 10, 2013
Not everyone deserves a second chance, but most of the characters on "American Horror Story" didn't belong in the Briarcliff Manor asylum in the first place. For those who survived the torturous evil of Dr. Arden, demon Mary Eunice and Dr. Oliver Thredson, this week's episode was about redemption and starting life anew. That is, except for Pepper. The little bald mutant gets sentenced to steaming bath therapy in what might be her last appearance. And Sister Jude, who will have plenty of time to diddle herself with cucumbers now that all her friends are gone.
NEWS
January 7, 2013
A frequent bugaboo of the fiscal cliff debacle was the "milk cliff" - the threat of milk price doubling if Congress failed to extend dairy subsidies. Parents were expected to forgo other necessities because their children "had to have milk. " Most industries would gladly give up their tax loopholes for that kind of product loyalty. But this one is totally undeserved. Consumption of dairy products, laden with saturated fats, cholesterol, hormones, and drugs, elevates the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
The four black orbs — dark-tinted security cameras — watch silently overhead in a room filled with stainless-steel pipes. The pipes carry raw milk from four large holding tanks outside the building into two large metal cabinets that look like oversized car radiators. This is one of the critical points in Cloverland Dairy's production process, where raw milk is pasteurized — heated well above 161 degrees Fahrenheit — and then pumped through pipes into other parts of the Baltimore plant for processing and packaging.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
LaQuasha Singletary was having a normal pregnancy until the day her blood pressure shot up and her vision blurred. The Pikesville woman was rushed to Sinai Hospital, where she delivered a 2-pound, 8-ounce baby boy named Caleb Lyles 10 weeks sooner than expected. Caleb's early delivery left him vulnerable to necrotizing intestinal disorder, a potentially deadly disease common in premature babies whose digestive systems aren't fully developed. Studies show feeding with breast milk exclusively reduces babies chances of getting the disease.
NEWS
March 24, 1994
Price commissions seldom work for the consumer's benefit. If the commodity is in high demand, the price rises (above or under the table) or the item becomes unavailable. If demand is low, many consumers will find the product or service elsewhere at a market price; the disadvantaged will be forced to pay the artificially set higher price.The proposal to create a state milk price commission is one such animal, even though its dairy farmer advocates claim it would not increase consumer prices.
NEWS
By David Horsey | May 15, 2012
If money is the mother's milk of politics, then America's big corporations are Big Mama, and Big Baby is the Republican Party suckling at the enormous bosom of business. Democrats, meanwhile, are abandoned brats scrounging for nourishment wherever they can find it. During the long decades the Democrats held a solid majority in Congress, campaign donations from the corporate world were spread around between incumbents in both parties -- not evenly, but at least the D's got their share.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | May 5, 2012
The Taneytown History Museum is featuring two small, but vivid, exhibits that focus on very different aspects of north Carroll County history: Its brush with the Civil War, and its 200-year heritage of dairy farming. The exhibit "Got Milk: A Brief History of Carroll County Dairy Farming, 1800-1930" takes up only one room in the museum on East Baltimore Street, yet offers a glimpse into dairy farming's economic and cultural importance in Carroll during earlier times. The displays are comprised of an eclectic assortment of photographs, paintings and articles describing several diary industry tools that were invented in Carroll County and marketed nationally.
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