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By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | March 17, 1991
Wielding everything from axes to boiling lye, American women have defended themselves and their country since Colonial days, an Air Forcemajor and history professor told a Women's Commission gathering Thursday.Ten county women active in Operation Desert Storm, honored in absentia, followed many women who served in military capacities, said Rita Gomez, who teaches at Anne Arundel Community College."The average person has the vague idea that women did not fight, and that the military was what we see in movies, with men all dressedup like John Wayne.
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NEWS
January 10, 2013
Thousands of military jobs have opened up to women in recent years, but not those in the front-line combat units. That may soon change, however, as a result of a lawsuit brought late last year by four women veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, including Staff Sgt. Jennifer Hunt of Gaithersburg. Their complaint alleges that banning women from combat roles solely on the basis of their gender violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution and restricts women's opportunities for career advancement and higher earnings and pensions.
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NEWS
By Joanna Daemmrich and Joanna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
"Women in the Military: Flirting with Disaster," by Brian Mitchell. Regnery. 405 pages. $24.95.Finally, a guy blurts out what others usually only dare to whine privately after a few beers: They had to let in women - and the old fraternity was ruined.Or, as Army veteran Brian Mitchell laments: The gutless brass sold out the nation's brave officers and gentlemen and left the once-proud military weak-kneed and demoralized. But as his book demonstrates, the politically correct don't have the monopoly on self-righteous and tiresome arguments about women in the military.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2000
SUNSET BEACH resident Linda Grant DePauw has a mission to the world to provide information on the role of women and the military. "From the very beginning, women have played various roles in wars, from behind-the-lines support to front-line duties," says DePauw, 60, professor emeritus of American history at George Washington University. DePauw has dedicated her professional life to supporting development of the little-known field of women's military studies. "Accurate information about women in the military has not been widely published or talked about generally," she says.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | June 21, 1992
The American public recently learned that both female U.S. soldiers taken prisoner during the gulf war were sexually assaulted by their Iraqi captors.One flight surgeon, whose helicopter was shot down, said that an "Iraqi soldier put his hands inside her flight suit, stopped when she screamed but later molested her," according to USA Today.I'll bet most of you, like me, were angered and disgusted when you learned of this.So what are we to make of reports that our own military men did virtually the same thing to our own military women after the war ended?
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 25, 1998
FORT BELVOIR, Va. -- The wife of former Army Sgt. Maj. Gene McKinney testified yesterday that she had no knowledge of any alleged sexual misbehavior until charges against her husband were aired in the media a year ago.Appearing as the first defense witness in McKinney's sexual misconduct court-martial, Wilhemina McKinney denied prosecution assertions that her husband is a compulsive womanizer who used his position to make sexual demands of military women.Mrs....
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | March 21, 1993
It has been called "one of our deepest military secrets" - sexual abuse of women in the armed forces.Studies in the past decade have alerted military officials to clandestine assaults and the more widespread problem of sexual harassment. In 1989 alone, for example, 11 percent of Army men and women said they had been assaulted by a fellow service member. And two out of three women, in a study of 20,000 military personnel, said they had been sexually harassed.But the much publicized manhandling of female aviators at the 1991 Tailhook Association convention in Las Vegas, Nev., and the sexual assaults against women soldiers who served in the Persian Gulf war may prove the real catalyst to change within this most male of men's clubs, women veterans and researchers who study the issue say."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Sexual harassment in the military remains a big problem, but not quite as big as it used to be, the Pentagon said yesterday.In the largest survey of its kind, 55 percent of women in the United States military reported experiencing some form of sexual harassment in the past year, including rape, assault, groping and pressure for sexual favors. That was a drop of 9 percentage points from results of a 1988 survey.The military has taken steps to raise consciousness and reduce rape, raunchiness and sexual rowdiness, especially since the 1991 Tailhook Association convention, at which aviators ran amok at a Las Vegas hotel, assaulting women and embarrassing the Navy.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 18, 1996
AT ABERDEEN the soldiers walk in pairs now. They go everywhere on the military grounds two by two, according to what the Army calls the "buddy system."But female "battle buddies" are not emblems of teamwork. Nor are they partners protecting each other from a foreign enemy. In this sorry chapter of military life, the danger to the women is from the friendly fire of sexual combat. From their own superiors.At the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland, a few brave women have broken the silence even at the risk of breaking ranks.
NEWS
November 14, 1993
When traditional histories of war mention women -- if at all -- it is usually as a footnote of some oddity like Deborah Sampson, a housewife during the Revolutionary War, who disguised herself as a man to join the Massachusetts Regiment.That is no longer possible. Debates may rage about women in combat, but women have become such an integral part of the nation's armed services that national leaders routinely refer to "our service men and women." That change came gradually, but it was thrust into our consciousness during Operation Desert Storm, with almost as many stories about mothers saying goodbye to their children as of fathers marching off to war.With the unveiling on Veterans' Day of a statue honoring women who served in Vietnam, military women are beginning to get public recognition for their contributions to the defense of the country.
NEWS
By Joanna Daemmrich and Joanna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
"Women in the Military: Flirting with Disaster," by Brian Mitchell. Regnery. 405 pages. $24.95.Finally, a guy blurts out what others usually only dare to whine privately after a few beers: They had to let in women - and the old fraternity was ruined.Or, as Army veteran Brian Mitchell laments: The gutless brass sold out the nation's brave officers and gentlemen and left the once-proud military weak-kneed and demoralized. But as his book demonstrates, the politically correct don't have the monopoly on self-righteous and tiresome arguments about women in the military.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 25, 1998
FORT BELVOIR, Va. -- The wife of former Army Sgt. Maj. Gene McKinney testified yesterday that she had no knowledge of any alleged sexual misbehavior until charges against her husband were aired in the media a year ago.Appearing as the first defense witness in McKinney's sexual misconduct court-martial, Wilhemina McKinney denied prosecution assertions that her husband is a compulsive womanizer who used his position to make sexual demands of military women.Mrs....
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 18, 1996
AT ABERDEEN the soldiers walk in pairs now. They go everywhere on the military grounds two by two, according to what the Army calls the "buddy system."But female "battle buddies" are not emblems of teamwork. Nor are they partners protecting each other from a foreign enemy. In this sorry chapter of military life, the danger to the women is from the friendly fire of sexual combat. From their own superiors.At the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland, a few brave women have broken the silence even at the risk of breaking ranks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Sexual harassment in the military remains a big problem, but not quite as big as it used to be, the Pentagon said yesterday.In the largest survey of its kind, 55 percent of women in the United States military reported experiencing some form of sexual harassment in the past year, including rape, assault, groping and pressure for sexual favors. That was a drop of 9 percentage points from results of a 1988 survey.The military has taken steps to raise consciousness and reduce rape, raunchiness and sexual rowdiness, especially since the 1991 Tailhook Association convention, at which aviators ran amok at a Las Vegas hotel, assaulting women and embarrassing the Navy.
NEWS
November 14, 1993
When traditional histories of war mention women -- if at all -- it is usually as a footnote of some oddity like Deborah Sampson, a housewife during the Revolutionary War, who disguised herself as a man to join the Massachusetts Regiment.That is no longer possible. Debates may rage about women in combat, but women have become such an integral part of the nation's armed services that national leaders routinely refer to "our service men and women." That change came gradually, but it was thrust into our consciousness during Operation Desert Storm, with almost as many stories about mothers saying goodbye to their children as of fathers marching off to war.With the unveiling on Veterans' Day of a statue honoring women who served in Vietnam, military women are beginning to get public recognition for their contributions to the defense of the country.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | April 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Defense Secretary Les Aspin plans to order all branches of the military this week to begin putting women in the cockpits of combat aircraft -- including everything from Apache helicopters to B-2 stealth bombers, senior defense officials said yesterday.And in an effort to clear the way for women to serve on Navy combat ships, he will also announce that the Clinton administration will ask Congress to repeal the long-standing combat exclusion law affecting naval assignments.Mr.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 7, 1992
Boston. -- Major Rhonda Cornum has a way to understand what happened to her. It was war, after all.An enemy shot down her plane in the Persian Gulf War, breaking both her arms. An enemy bullet lodged in her right shoulder. And an enemy hand violated her body, vaginally and rectally.When she talked about her ordeal as a prisoner of war last week, the strong-minded flight surgeon said that the indecent assault ranked as ''unpleasant, that's all.'' Other POWs were beaten, shocked with cattle prods, starved.
NEWS
January 10, 2013
Thousands of military jobs have opened up to women in recent years, but not those in the front-line combat units. That may soon change, however, as a result of a lawsuit brought late last year by four women veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, including Staff Sgt. Jennifer Hunt of Gaithersburg. Their complaint alleges that banning women from combat roles solely on the basis of their gender violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Constitution and restricts women's opportunities for career advancement and higher earnings and pensions.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | April 5, 1993
Linda Grant De Pauw always had trouble getting her young son Ben to talk. To coax him along, she would spin fanciful yarns for him based on his favorite television show, "Star Trek."Eventually, she and Ben created a universe of strange creatures and characters. Among them, Maggie Steele, the heroine of Dr. De Pauw's new science fiction novel, "Baptism of Fire."Dr. DePauw, a Pasadena resident, is the founder of the Minerva Center, an international clearinghouse for information about women and the military.
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