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By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1999
One recent chilly morning, Kenny Sayers strapped on a helmet and climbed behind the wheel of a murky-brown truck at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Within seconds, a ton of military metal careened down a puddle-filled roadway at 40 mph, splashing salt water all over itself before coming to a soggy halt."
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NEWS
By SOLOMON MOORE and SOLOMON MOORE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 21, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- As the mutilated bodies of two American soldiers were flown to the United States in flag-draped coffins last night, the U.S. military launched a top-level investigation to determine why their vehicle had been traveling alone outside a fortified Army camp when they were abducted. A group affiliated with al-Qaida in Iraq took responsibility for killing the servicemen, whose corpses were found near an electrical plant in Yousifiya, where they had disappeared Friday night.
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NEWS
By Adriane B. Miller and Adriane B. Miller,Contributing Writer | May 16, 1993
Kids ogled rockets, missiles and cannons. Curious visitor checked out automated robots, military vehicles from World War I to the present, parachuting soldiers and leaping frogs. Families took in an Army chorus's marching songs and ballads.As Aberdeen Proving Ground opened its gates for its annual Armed Forces Day yesterday, post officials said 10,000 visitors from Maryland and neighboring states attended.Scoutmaster Doug Haar brought 29 Boy Scouts from Troop 33 in East Petersburg, Pa."They didn't know what to expect, but they are looking forward to all the festivities," Mr. Haar said.
NEWS
By WESAL ZAMAN AND PAUL WATSON and WESAL ZAMAN AND PAUL WATSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 30, 2006
KABUL, Afghanistan -- In the Afghan capital's worst unrest since the fall of the Taliban five years ago, Afghan mobs fought running battles yesterday with troops and police trying to quell riots sparked when U.S. military vehicles fled the scene of a fatal accident after hitting civilians. At least eight people were killed and more than 100 injured, most in the rioting that followed an early morning traffic accident involving a convoy of U.S. military vehicles, Afghan officials said. Rioters attacked the offices of the United Nations and foreign aid agencies, stealing computers, books, desks and even shoes.
NEWS
By WESAL ZAMAN AND PAUL WATSON and WESAL ZAMAN AND PAUL WATSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 30, 2006
KABUL, Afghanistan -- In the Afghan capital's worst unrest since the fall of the Taliban five years ago, Afghan mobs fought running battles yesterday with troops and police trying to quell riots sparked when U.S. military vehicles fled the scene of a fatal accident after hitting civilians. At least eight people were killed and more than 100 injured, most in the rioting that followed an early morning traffic accident involving a convoy of U.S. military vehicles, Afghan officials said. Rioters attacked the offices of the United Nations and foreign aid agencies, stealing computers, books, desks and even shoes.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 19, 1991
DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- A month of allied bombing may have killed or wounded 50,000 to 60,000 Iraqi soldiers, according to a pair of military analysts experienced in estimating battlefield casualties.There are no confirmed Iraqi casualty figures available, but formulas developed in the aftermath of past conflicts indicate that as many as 18,000 Iraqi troops may have died in the bombing, according to one military theorist, Trevor Dupuy.Mr. Dupuy, a retired U.S. Army colonel, estimated the total Iraqi casualties at 60,000.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 15, 2003
FALLUJAH, Iraq - Thousands of U.S. troops backed by tanks, planes and helicopters carried out extensive raids early this morning across Iraq, military officials announced. It was unclear how many Iraqis might have been killed or wounded in the largest U.S. military operation in Iraq since the end of major fighting. No U.S. casualties were reported. Dozens of suspected Baath Party members were arrested. It was not known early today whether any senior Iraqi officials were apprehended. The nationwide raids had been planned for days, military officials said, and appeared to be an effort to break the back of a nascent armed resistance that had sprung up in the area of the country dominated by Iraq's Sunni Muslim minority.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2003
Aberdeen Proving Ground researchers are set to open what is being called the world's largest truck-testing facility, a $38.5 million high-tech megacenter designed to uplift the Army's beleaguered transportation-design reputation and to attract the international automotive industry's attention. The roadway simulator, a nine-year undertaking by the U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center, is the automobile industry's equivalent of a stress test. Much as physicians wire patients running on a treadmill to pinpoint heart problems, engineers bolt large military vehicles -- driven by a faceless blue robot nicknamed "Bert" -- onto four treadmill-like tracks and run them through strenuous tests to diagnose design flaws.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2003
Aberdeen Proving Ground researchers are set to open what is being called the world's largest truck-testing facility, a $38.5 million high-tech megacenter designed to uplift the Army's beleaguered transportation-design reputation and to attract the international automotive industry's attention. The roadway simulator, a nine-year undertaking by the U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center, is the automobile industry's equivalent of a stress test. Much as physicians wire patients running on a treadmill to pinpoint heart problems, engineers bolt large military vehicles - driven by a faceless blue robot nicknamed "Bert" - onto four treadmill-like tracks and run them through strenuous tests to diagnose design flaws.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Staff Writer | December 21, 1992
UANLE UEN, Somalia -- The small convoy carrying Lt. Scott Criswell's security team kicked up huge clouds of dirt as it made an abrupt stop in the center of town and promptly drew a mob of more than 100 cheering and clapping children, many of them clad in turquoise T-shirts.Suddenly, Sgt. Rich Helms, the 23-year-old assistant team leader, announced: "Chinese SK in the doorway."None of the soldiers got excited. They had seen the automatic rifle and many others in this town before. Someone remarked that more guns seemed to surface with each visit, and others nodded in agreement.
NEWS
By Daren Briscoe and Daren Briscoe,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 14, 2004
The rise of the machines suffered something of a setback yesterday as a fleet of high-tech, unmanned vehicles demonstrated the ability to plow into fences, snarl themselves in barbed wire and even self-immolate, all unaided by human hands. Played out in the unforgiving sands of the Mojave Desert, the ill-fated spectacle was a competition sponsored by the Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which specializes in cutting-edge, high-risk ventures with the potential for military application.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2003
Harford County lost out to Possum Point, Va., in the competition for one of the biggest economic development plums to come along in nearly a decade - a $100 million-plus plant to build a new amphibious assault vehicle for the Marines. The tiny Northern Virginia community was selected by General Dynamics Corp. on Tuesday as the site for a 450,000-square-foot factory - larger than the General Motors Corp. Allison Transmission plant in White Marsh - that is expected to employ 350 manufacturing workers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 15, 2003
FALLUJAH, Iraq - Thousands of U.S. troops backed by tanks, planes and helicopters carried out extensive raids early this morning across Iraq, military officials announced. It was unclear how many Iraqis might have been killed or wounded in the largest U.S. military operation in Iraq since the end of major fighting. No U.S. casualties were reported. Dozens of suspected Baath Party members were arrested. It was not known early today whether any senior Iraqi officials were apprehended. The nationwide raids had been planned for days, military officials said, and appeared to be an effort to break the back of a nascent armed resistance that had sprung up in the area of the country dominated by Iraq's Sunni Muslim minority.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2003
Aberdeen Proving Ground researchers are set to open what is being called the world's largest truck-testing facility, a $38.5 million high-tech megacenter designed to uplift the Army's beleaguered transportation-design reputation and to attract the international automotive industry's attention. The roadway simulator, a nine-year undertaking by the U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center, is the automobile industry's equivalent of a stress test. Much as physicians wire patients running on a treadmill to pinpoint heart problems, engineers bolt large military vehicles -- driven by a faceless blue robot nicknamed "Bert" -- onto four treadmill-like tracks and run them through strenuous tests to diagnose design flaws.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2003
Aberdeen Proving Ground researchers are set to open what is being called the world's largest truck-testing facility, a $38.5 million high-tech megacenter designed to uplift the Army's beleaguered transportation-design reputation and to attract the international automotive industry's attention. The roadway simulator, a nine-year undertaking by the U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center, is the automobile industry's equivalent of a stress test. Much as physicians wire patients running on a treadmill to pinpoint heart problems, engineers bolt large military vehicles - driven by a faceless blue robot nicknamed "Bert" - onto four treadmill-like tracks and run them through strenuous tests to diagnose design flaws.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 11, 2003
ON HIGHWAY 8, Iraq - The tanks and trucks and buses, shot up, burned out and spent, linger like ghosts on the median of the highway, along its sides and off to the distance, buried in the sand, dead. The harm they represent is past. They are no longer frightening, compared to the cautious soldiers and their pointed guns or the helicopter gunships that fly so low above the road that it seems the children who jump at them could grab hold. Highway 8, the road to Baghdad, is a well-worn stretch of pavement that wriggles through the sand like a desert snake.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 28, 2003
SOUTHERN IRAQ - For an elite rapid-deployment force, the Army's 101st Airborne Division sometimes moves excruciatingly slowly. It took a truck convoy a full 18 hours to move just 30 miles from its base camp in northern Kuwait to the Iraqi border yesterday - only the beginning of a long journey. One or another vehicle would break down, and when it was fixed another would stall. Even when the convoy moved, it did so at about 10 miles an hour, passed on both sides by other American and British military vehicles including a caravan of 54 fuel tankers.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon scrambled yesterday to investigate a NATO attack on a convoy of military vehicles in Kosovo, trying to prove that dozens of ethnic Albanian civilians who were killed nearby were the victims of a Serbian atrocity and not the NATO planes.Describing the incident, U.S. and NATO officials said last night that their aircraft attacked Serbian military vehicles yesterday in a village between Dakovica and Prizren, but then abruptly halted the strikes after spotting civilian vehicles near the military ones.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 28, 2003
SOUTHERN IRAQ - For an elite rapid-deployment force, the Army's 101st Airborne Division sometimes moves excruciatingly slowly. It took a truck convoy a full 18 hours to move just 30 miles from its base camp in northern Kuwait to the Iraqi border yesterday - only the beginning of a long journey. One or another vehicle would break down, and when it was fixed another would stall. Even when the convoy moved, it did so at about 10 miles an hour, passed on both sides by other American and British military vehicles including a caravan of 54 fuel tankers.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 11, 2001
Manchester town officials plan to install three stop signs in the Whispering Valley community to slow traffic. Police Chief Charles Lewis recommended Tuesday night that signs be added at Rachele Court, Augusta Road and Michelle Road, off Route 30, to break up long stretches of open street between existing stop signs. Recent speed monitoring on the 20-mph roads found a range of 17 mph to 42 mph, he said, with about 7 percent of vehicles speeding. The chief also received approval to seek a surplus military four-wheel-drive vehicle for use primarily in snow.
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