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By New York Times News Service | October 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Israel has sold advanced military technology to China for more than a decade and is moving to expand its cooperation with Beijing, says R. James Woolsey, the director of central intelligence.The CIA assessment was provided in written responses to questions by the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee. The committee made the assessment public last week as part of a report on recent hearings it conducted on "proliferation threats of the 1990s," a committee aide said last night.
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NEWS
June 3, 2013
The Baltimore Sun's editorial, "Fight cyber attacks, not privacy" (May 3) does readers a true disservice by perpetuating several myths about this critical issue. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) is simple, allowing the American government and businesses to voluntarily share classified information on impending cyber threats before an attack occurs. The editorial clearly describes how China and other countries are robbing America blind, stealing valuable trade secrets and military technology.
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NEWS
By Matt Schroeder and Rachel Stohl | March 31, 2004
WASHINGTON - The United States has rewarded Pakistan yet again for its support of the U.S. war on terror with increased access to U.S. weapons and technology even though the father of Pakistan's nuclear program, Abdul Qadeer Khan, admitted supplying nuclear technology to Iran, North Korea and Libya. The reward is the U.S. designation of Pakistan as a "major non-NATO ally," or MNNA. Pakistan thus joins an exclusive club that includes Australia, Japan, Egypt, Kuwait, South Korea, Argentina, New Zealand, Israel and the Philippines.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2004
Near Iraq's border with Kuwait, Sean P. Collins, a Special Forces team sergeant, met a group of children and asked them if they had seen the enemy. He spoke into a hand-held black box, called the Phraselator, which translated his English into Arabic and broadcast it clearly through a speaker. The children pointed to a weapons cache, which included a mortar tube that was ready to be used and rocket-propelled grenades, which Collins destroyed. "Finding the weapons cache with the kids ... never would have happened if I didn't pull out the unit," said Collins, who noted that several military teams had previously passed through the area without detecting the weapons.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is considering the transfer of sophisticated new weaponry to Israel as concrete evidence of its pledge to strengthen Israel's security following its agreement with the Palestine Liberation Organization, according to officials.Mr. Clinton publicly has sought to reassure the Israeli people that the United States remains unalterably committed to protecting Israel, even as Washington sponsors the creation of an independent Palestinian entity on Israel's borders.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
Citing the Biblical injunction to "beat swords into plowshares," President Clinton came to Baltimore in March 1993 to offer the country's defense industries billions of dollars to help turn military technology to civilian purposes.The president said he wanted to "take some of the most talented people in the world, who've produced some of the most sophisticated military technology, and put that to work in the civilian economy." To do it, he proposed spending $20 billion over five years.The Biblical phrase, and the goals Mr. Clinton espoused, have come trippingly to the tongues of U.S. politicians and businessmen ever since George Washington's days, every time the country has felt secure enough to cut back its military.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
The Baltimore Sun's editorial, "Fight cyber attacks, not privacy" (May 3) does readers a true disservice by perpetuating several myths about this critical issue. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) is simple, allowing the American government and businesses to voluntarily share classified information on impending cyber threats before an attack occurs. The editorial clearly describes how China and other countries are robbing America blind, stealing valuable trade secrets and military technology.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2004
Near Iraq's border with Kuwait, Sean P. Collins, a Special Forces team sergeant, met a group of children and asked them if they had seen the enemy. He spoke into a hand-held black box, called the Phraselator, which translated his English into Arabic and broadcast it clearly through a speaker. The children pointed to a weapons cache, which included a mortar tube that was ready to be used and rocket-propelled grenades, which Collins destroyed. "Finding the weapons cache with the kids ... never would have happened if I didn't pull out the unit," said Collins, who noted that several military teams had previously passed through the area without detecting the weapons.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | April 27, 1992
There's nothing like an election campaign to invigorate the spirit of domestic reform in George Bush, now emerging as the champion of high-tech industrial resurrection, not long after his sudden embrace of another long-neglected issue, health-care reform.In the Bush glossary of governmental horrors, direct federal help for civilian industry is still denounced as ''industrial policy.'' Uttered with abhorrence, it is defined as inevitably doomed attempts by government bureaucrats to ''pick winners'' in the commercial marketplace.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | March 7, 1991
New York. The war in the gulf would be a defining moment in American history, said the president of the United States before it began. George Bush is a man of soft speech and noisy rhetoric, but it seems possible that for once he erred on the side of rhetorical restraint. This war may define a new world.The big story of the past two months, 60 days that changed the world, is not about the present or future of the Middle East. That rich and cursed place will continue to be what it has been long after this batch of dead are buried.
NEWS
By Matt Schroeder and Rachel Stohl | March 31, 2004
WASHINGTON - The United States has rewarded Pakistan yet again for its support of the U.S. war on terror with increased access to U.S. weapons and technology even though the father of Pakistan's nuclear program, Abdul Qadeer Khan, admitted supplying nuclear technology to Iran, North Korea and Libya. The reward is the U.S. designation of Pakistan as a "major non-NATO ally," or MNNA. Pakistan thus joins an exclusive club that includes Australia, Japan, Egypt, Kuwait, South Korea, Argentina, New Zealand, Israel and the Philippines.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2003
WASHINGTON - With two recent attacks on big airplanes leaving Baghdad International Airport in Iraq, experts on civilian aviation are debating how civilian airliners outside the battle zones could be protected from shoulder-fired missiles. The Department of Homeland Security is planning to announce soon that it has selected two or three teams of bidders to explore how to put military-style anti-missile technology on airliners. But airline experts have been questioning whether onboard systems are adequate.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1996
Dispatch radio is telecommunications at its least glamorous.It's Danny DeVito in "Taxi" barking orders to cabdrivers over a crackly two-way radio. It's a plumbing company calling one of its trucks when your pipes burst. It's "10-4" when drivers can "copy" through the static and "you're breaking up" when they can't.Communicating with taxis, trucks and other commercial vehicles might not have the panache of the Internet, but top executives of Geotek Communications Inc. see it as a business with enormous opportunities.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 6, 1995
Washington. -- In 1895 young Ernest Rutherford was digging potatoes on his family's New Zealand farm when a cable brought word of his scholarship to study physics at Cambridge University. He exclaimed, ''That's the last potato I'll dig!''Instead, he and the 11 Nobel laureates with whom he worked would produce the revolution in physics that smashed the atom, and Hiroshima and Nagasaki.In the war's end was its beginning. It was to Hiroshima that Japan's fleet returned in triumph from Pearl Harbor.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | December 31, 1994
Russell B. Stevenson Sr., who contributed to the development of military technologies used in World War II and the Cold War, died Wednesday at Union Memorial Hospital of respiratory failure. The Ruxton resident was 87.He was born in Bessemer, Ala., and moved to Ruxton as a boy after his father died. He spent his adult years in Roland Park and, more recently, in Ruxton.A graduate of Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, Mr. Stevenson served as PTA president while his sons were students there.He graduated in 1929 from the Johns Hopkins University, where he studied engineering and was a member of the Delta Phi fraternity.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1994
Citing the Biblical injunction to "beat swords into plowshares," President Clinton came to Baltimore in March 1993 to offer the country's defense industries billions of dollars to help turn military technology to civilian purposes.The president said he wanted to "take some of the most talented people in the world, who've produced some of the most sophisticated military technology, and put that to work in the civilian economy." To do it, he proposed spending $20 billion over five years.The Biblical phrase, and the goals Mr. Clinton espoused, have come trippingly to the tongues of U.S. politicians and businessmen ever since George Washington's days, every time the country has felt secure enough to cut back its military.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | January 29, 1991
SINCE America began developing the stunningly effective, ultra-high-technology Patriot and Tomahawk missiles, America's hold on global consumer electronics production has shrunk from 70 percent to just 5 percent of world markets. How can American technology be so advanced in the military realm and so retarded commercially?The answer has to do with America's priorities. Where military supremacy is the goal, the government has spared no expense. But where research and deRobertKuttnervelopment aimed at commercial prowess are concerned, not only is there less public subsidy, the entire exercise is considered illegitimate.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 6, 1995
Washington. -- In 1895 young Ernest Rutherford was digging potatoes on his family's New Zealand farm when a cable brought word of his scholarship to study physics at Cambridge University. He exclaimed, ''That's the last potato I'll dig!''Instead, he and the 11 Nobel laureates with whom he worked would produce the revolution in physics that smashed the atom, and Hiroshima and Nagasaki.In the war's end was its beginning. It was to Hiroshima that Japan's fleet returned in triumph from Pearl Harbor.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Israel has sold advanced military technology to China for more than a decade and is moving to expand its cooperation with Beijing, says R. James Woolsey, the director of central intelligence.The CIA assessment was provided in written responses to questions by the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee. The committee made the assessment public last week as part of a report on recent hearings it conducted on "proliferation threats of the 1990s," a committee aide said last night.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 15, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is considering the transfer of sophisticated new weaponry to Israel as concrete evidence of its pledge to strengthen Israel's security following its agreement with the Palestine Liberation Organization, according to officials.Mr. Clinton publicly has sought to reassure the Israeli people that the United States remains unalterably committed to protecting Israel, even as Washington sponsors the creation of an independent Palestinian entity on Israel's borders.
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