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By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 24, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration expects some Arab countries to oppose any decision to launch a military strike against Iraq, but it wouldn't be deterred from using force so long as most allies agreed that such action was needed, a senior U.S. official said yesterday.While the administration still prefers to rely on trade sanctions and diplomacy to pressure Iraqi troops into leaving Kuwait, the U.S.-led international alliance could choose the military option at any time without further provocation by Iraq, the U.S. official said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 5, 2013
It's arguable that there should be a response to the chemical attack that took place last week, ("Punishing Syria," Aug. 26). The perpetrators of this atrocity must be apprehended and brought to justice internationally. However, it is stretching credulity to believe that a U.S. strike on an alleged chemical weapons facility will save more lives as opposed to continued tough diplomacy. In addition, it would be difficult to justify a military strike as a legitimate response when there is no imminent threat to the United States, nor can a retaliatory war of this kind be said to be a war of last resort.
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NEWS
September 26, 2012
Israel is currently sounding off over what it views as the limited effectiveness of economic sanctions as a way of stopping Iran's nuclear weapons program. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has criticized President Obama's failure to specify what would provoke a U.S. military strike against existing Iran's nuclear facilities. Mr. Obama's current wait-and-see policy is clearly the wrong approach. Iran has no moral right to weapons of mass destruction, while Israel does have a moral right to prevent Iran from obtaining them.
NEWS
By Faheem Younus | September 3, 2013
Mr. President, you and I having a similar challenge: selling a military strike against Syria as a "moral imperative. " But we have different audiences. Your constituents come from all parts of the country; mine from different parts of the world. Yours are driven by myriad interests; mine are simply seeking justice. Yours are young and old; mine are mostly teenagers. You call yours, "the U.S. Congress. " I call mine "the Younus family. " Mr. President, my nephews and nieces, who live in Pakistan, Canada and elsewhere, buy the fact that Syiran President Bashar Assad should be ousted and held responsible for his reprehensible actions against his own people.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 23, 1990
CAMP DAVID -- President Bush said yesterday that it would be "nice" to have congressional approval for a military strike against Iraq but that he is prepared to proceed without it if force proves the only way to drive Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait."
NEWS
By Karen Hoslerand Richard H. P. Sia and Karen Hoslerand Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 29, 1990
WASHINGTON -- President Bush exaggerated the nuclear threat posed by Iraq when he cited Saddam Hussein's efforts to develop atomic weapons as a rationale for launching a military strike against him sooner rather than later, military experts say.Two former chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, a former CIA director and leading scientists argue that the nuclear materials available to Mr. Hussein are barely sufficient to produce one crude, nearly immobile bomb...
NEWS
September 5, 2013
It's arguable that there should be a response to the chemical attack that took place last week, ("Punishing Syria," Aug. 26). The perpetrators of this atrocity must be apprehended and brought to justice internationally. However, it is stretching credulity to believe that a U.S. strike on an alleged chemical weapons facility will save more lives as opposed to continued tough diplomacy. In addition, it would be difficult to justify a military strike as a legitimate response when there is no imminent threat to the United States, nor can a retaliatory war of this kind be said to be a war of last resort.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 1, 1990
PARIS -- The more than 5,000 hostages being held in Iraq and Kuwait would be released only in exchange for "solid guarantees" that Iraq would not be subject to a military strike, the Iraqi ambassador to Paris said yesterday.Abdul Razzak al-Hachimi also said that Baghdad interpreted remarks by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and French President Francois Mitterrand as a joint refusal to resolve the Persian Gulf standoff militarily, signaling a deep split in the coalition against Iraq.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A military strike against Saddam Hussein would not only target sites used to develop chemical and biological weapons but also would target military units that help keep the Iraqi leader in power and threaten neighboring states, administration officials said.The administration escalated anti-Hussein rhetoric yesterday as President Clinton met with top military leaders and the Pentagon accelerated the movement of U.S. warships to the Persian Gulf.A Navy carrier group is expected to arrive in the gulf Nov. 23, three days earlier than expected, to relieve Navy forces already there and give sailors time to train for military action.
NEWS
February 10, 2004
NOT ONCE but twice voters have been treated recently to extraordinary displays of the volatility of politics: former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean's heart-stopping plunge from Democratic front-runner to primary shutout, and the simultaneous free-fall of the president he seeks to unseat. Less than two weeks after President Bush confidently delivered a status quo State of the Union address crafted to appeal almost exclusively to his conservative Republican base, he was so desperate for a forum to defend himself he voluntarily entered the gladiator pit of Sunday morning talk television.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
Members of Maryland's congressional delegation welcomed a debate on whether the U.S. should launch a military strike against Syria but said Saturday they want to review classified intelligence reports - and hear about the scope of President Barack Obama's plan - before deciding whether to sign off. The administration is expected to begin briefing lawmakers Sunday, a day after Obama announced he would seek congressional authorization for a strike...
NEWS
September 26, 2012
Israel is currently sounding off over what it views as the limited effectiveness of economic sanctions as a way of stopping Iran's nuclear weapons program. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has criticized President Obama's failure to specify what would provoke a U.S. military strike against existing Iran's nuclear facilities. Mr. Obama's current wait-and-see policy is clearly the wrong approach. Iran has no moral right to weapons of mass destruction, while Israel does have a moral right to prevent Iran from obtaining them.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
I try to follow the political discussion in the U.S. and am amazed how much effort it takes even to begin to be well-informed. If you are serious about being informed, you can't be the least bit lazy and depend on a couple of pundits to shape your world view. You have to get out there and study the people you disagree with - in their own words, not the pundits' words. Information comes at you like a fire hose and you better not be off to the side sipping out of a dripping garden hose.
NEWS
By Colin McMahon and Colin McMahon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 16, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - U.S. warplanes struck insurgent-held Fallujah hard yesterday, the latest assault in a bombing campaign that has intensified with the start of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Vowing to disrupt guerrilla bands planning car bombings and other attacks, and mindful that Ramadan last year brought a surge in such incidents, the U.S. military is targeting Fallujah sites that it says are being used by militants linked to Abu Musab al-Zarqawi. Al-Zarqawi's group claimed responsibility for the twin bombings Thursday in Baghdad's fortified Green Zone, and security was tightened there and at other strategic sites housing Western soldiers and civilians.
NEWS
February 10, 2004
NOT ONCE but twice voters have been treated recently to extraordinary displays of the volatility of politics: former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean's heart-stopping plunge from Democratic front-runner to primary shutout, and the simultaneous free-fall of the president he seeks to unseat. Less than two weeks after President Bush confidently delivered a status quo State of the Union address crafted to appeal almost exclusively to his conservative Republican base, he was so desperate for a forum to defend himself he voluntarily entered the gladiator pit of Sunday morning talk television.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 16, 2001
Some marriages of convenience end in disappointment, but few fail as spectacularly as the one forged seven years ago between Pakistan and the Taliban in the southern Afghan desert. What began with the Taliban's rescue of a hijacked Pakistani truck convoy turned into a symbiotic relationship that propelled the Taliban to power just two years later. The Taliban, in turn, provided Pakistan with a friendly regime on its western border and secure trade routes to Central Asia. In the end - as the world now knows - nothing turned out as either Pakistan or the Taliban had hoped.
NEWS
February 23, 2012
I try to follow the political discussion in the U.S. and am amazed how much effort it takes even to begin to be well-informed. If you are serious about being informed, you can't be the least bit lazy and depend on a couple of pundits to shape your world view. You have to get out there and study the people you disagree with - in their own words, not the pundits' words. Information comes at you like a fire hose and you better not be off to the side sipping out of a dripping garden hose.
NEWS
By Michael R. Gordon and Michael R. Gordon,New York Times News Service | January 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Angered by President Saddam Hussein's response to U.S. ultimatums and his subsequent defiance of the United Nations, President Bush has decided to launch a military strike soon against Iraq, U.S. and allied officials said yesterday.Senior U.S. officials said it was conceivable that Baghdad could stay Mr. Bush's hand with immediate and broad compliance with United Nations demands. But they said the administration assumed this would not happen and that air attacks would take place at the earliest opportunity.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
Naval Academy football players realize they someday may be called upon to address a far more important mission than winning a game. As future Navy and Marine Corps officers, they will be required to defend the nation when the need arises, as it did in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. In the meantime, they - and their brethren at the U.S. Military Academy and Air Force Academy - must cope with the immediate task, the combination of military, academic and athletic demands that make them unique.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - The deaths of four aid workers this week in Afghanistan - the first independently confirmed civilian casualties in the U.S. military campaign - cast a grim spotlight on the dangers and difficulties inherent in delivering humanitarian relief to a region already in crisis. Afghanistan, ravaged by two decades of civil unrest, three years of severe drought and widespread economic collapse, faces another threat: military strikes that are hindering critical relief efforts. "The situation is abysmal," said Robert C. Orr, a senior fellow with the Center for Strategic and International Studies and a former deputy U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.
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