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February 17, 2010
The Sun editorial, "Winning hearts and minds" (Feb. 16), is right on when it says that "civilian deaths underscore the risks of the U.S. strategy in Afghanistan." It is common knowledge that in today's wars, more civilians are killed than soldiers. In Iraq, for example, the U.S. military was responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of Iraqi civilians, maybe more. And I refuse to call these deaths collateral damage. Eventually, though, the editorial goes astray in thinking the right military strategy will bring about peace in Afghanistan.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
While President Barack Obama described plans Thursday to make the U.S. military "leaner," officials in Maryland said the focus of installations and defense contractors here on intelligence, cyberwarfare, research and development is likely to protect the state from the deep cuts feared elsewhere. The defense strategy the president unveiled calls for bolstering the U.S. military presence in the Asian-Pacific region and increasing investment in NATO and other partnerships as the United States pulls troops from Iraq and Afghanistan.
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NEWS
By The New York Times | December 24, 1990
PRESIDENT BUSH may think his Jan. 15 deadline for Saddam Hussein to get out of Kuwait is diplomatically essential, but it's militarily imprudent.Lt. Gen. Calvin Waller, the deputy commander of U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf, has acknowledged that in public, confirming what well-informed military analysts, and Saddam, already knew.The Jan. 15 deadline creates pressure for an unrealistic quick fix, a short war waged exclusively by air strikes.That glib fantasy may thrill armchair strategists and animate air power enthusiasts.
NEWS
February 17, 2010
The Sun editorial, "Winning hearts and minds" (Feb. 16), is right on when it says that "civilian deaths underscore the risks of the U.S. strategy in Afghanistan." It is common knowledge that in today's wars, more civilians are killed than soldiers. In Iraq, for example, the U.S. military was responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of Iraqi civilians, maybe more. And I refuse to call these deaths collateral damage. Eventually, though, the editorial goes astray in thinking the right military strategy will bring about peace in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Jack Shanahan | June 29, 2001
WASHINGTON - Since taking office, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld wisely has pushed ahead with an in-depth review of Pentagon policies, arguing that America first must clarify its military strategy - and identify potential threats - before approving steep budget increases for defense. The Pentagon already consumes about half of the discretionary budget. But even before the administration's comprehensive review is complete, Mr. Rumsfeld has concluded that the Pentagon needs a major budget increase.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | June 26, 2007
BAGHDAD -- It's easy to get very, very angry at the Bush administration when you are visiting the Iraqi capital. The violence causing Iraqis such hideous pain and claiming more U.S. troops can be traced directly to the mistakes made by U.S. officials, before and after the invasion. You will hear this truth - often in harsher tones - from U.S. military commanders, top Iraqi officials, and ordinary Iraqis here. Many Iraqis find it hard to believe the Americans could have made such a mess unless they secretly meant to destroy the country.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. command hopes to use the armor and infantry units now reinforcing the Somalian capital to evict heavily armed Somalian militia forces that have surrounded allied bases in downtown Mogadishu.The militia members, loyal to Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid, also control all the main roads. In the past week, they have used their positions to kill and wound American soldiers by laying mines in the roads and shelling the bases with mortars.If the mission succeeds, Pentagon officials said, the allies will no longer be pinned down in this way, and key points throughout Mogadishu's downtown will be dotted with garrisons and monitored with patrols and checkpoints.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and Noam N. Levey and James Gerstenzang and Noam N. Levey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- With generals warning that long deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan are stretching the Army to the breaking point, President Bush is asking for plans to expand the military for a long war against terrorism, a senior administration official said yesterday. The growth would reverse the course pursued by Donald H. Rumsfeld, who as defense secretary set out six years ago to restructure the nation's military forces and advocated cutting two divisions, or about 40,000 soldiers, from the Army.
NEWS
February 6, 2007
Resolution impedes cutoff of war funds The Senate should reject the Levin-Warner nonbinding resolution on Iraq ("Symbolic measure spurs war debate," Feb. 5). America's imperial invasion of Iraq has been an unmitigated disaster. With tens of thousands of Iraqis and more than 3,000 Americans needlessly slaughtered, and countless more physically and psychologically maimed for life, it is time to end President Bush's criminal venture to dominate the Middle East for the benefit of his corporate friends.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
While President Barack Obama described plans Thursday to make the U.S. military "leaner," officials in Maryland said the focus of installations and defense contractors here on intelligence, cyberwarfare, research and development is likely to protect the state from the deep cuts feared elsewhere. The defense strategy the president unveiled calls for bolstering the U.S. military presence in the Asian-Pacific region and increasing investment in NATO and other partnerships as the United States pulls troops from Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Absorbing the lessons of a troubled war, U.S. military officials have begun an intense debate over proposals for a sweeping reorganization of the Army to address shortcomings that have beset the force in Iraq and to abandon some war-fighting principles that have prevailed since the Cold War. On one side of the widening debate are officers who want many Army units to become specialized, so that entire units or even divisions are dedicated to...
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | June 26, 2007
BAGHDAD -- It's easy to get very, very angry at the Bush administration when you are visiting the Iraqi capital. The violence causing Iraqis such hideous pain and claiming more U.S. troops can be traced directly to the mistakes made by U.S. officials, before and after the invasion. You will hear this truth - often in harsher tones - from U.S. military commanders, top Iraqi officials, and ordinary Iraqis here. Many Iraqis find it hard to believe the Americans could have made such a mess unless they secretly meant to destroy the country.
NEWS
February 6, 2007
Resolution impedes cutoff of war funds The Senate should reject the Levin-Warner nonbinding resolution on Iraq ("Symbolic measure spurs war debate," Feb. 5). America's imperial invasion of Iraq has been an unmitigated disaster. With tens of thousands of Iraqis and more than 3,000 Americans needlessly slaughtered, and countless more physically and psychologically maimed for life, it is time to end President Bush's criminal venture to dominate the Middle East for the benefit of his corporate friends.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and Noam N. Levey and James Gerstenzang and Noam N. Levey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- With generals warning that long deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan are stretching the Army to the breaking point, President Bush is asking for plans to expand the military for a long war against terrorism, a senior administration official said yesterday. The growth would reverse the course pursued by Donald H. Rumsfeld, who as defense secretary set out six years ago to restructure the nation's military forces and advocated cutting two divisions, or about 40,000 soldiers, from the Army.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2001
Aberdeen. Tailhook. Kelly Flinn. Not the sort of subjects you'd want to bring up around the top brass of the Army, Navy and Air Force. But at the Defense Information School at Fort Meade, military officers spend much of their time discussing these and other image-tarnishing disasters. Each scandal becomes the vehicle to teach the next class of military journalists and public affairs officers what not to do when talking to the press. The school's credo is "maximum disclosure, minimum delay"; its challenge is balancing the military's need for secrecy with the public's right to know.
NEWS
By Jack Shanahan | June 29, 2001
WASHINGTON - Since taking office, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld wisely has pushed ahead with an in-depth review of Pentagon policies, arguing that America first must clarify its military strategy - and identify potential threats - before approving steep budget increases for defense. The Pentagon already consumes about half of the discretionary budget. But even before the administration's comprehensive review is complete, Mr. Rumsfeld has concluded that the Pentagon needs a major budget increase.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 8, 2000
WASHINGTON - Vice Adm. John B. Nathman, the new commander of the Navy's air forces in the Pacific, finally reached the end of his rope. He had seen too many aging aircraft trying to keep up with the increased demands of overseas missions. Too many hangars without spare parts. Too much decrepit housing for sailors. So in his change-of-command speech aboard the carrier USS Constellation two weeks ago, he let loose. "We have reached such a low level of funding it will soon be impossible to meet the expectations of this nation," he told hundreds of sailors, Marines and their guests in San Diego.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2001
Aberdeen. Tailhook. Kelly Flinn. Not the sort of subjects you'd want to bring up around the top brass of the Army, Navy and Air Force. But at the Defense Information School at Fort Meade, military officers spend much of their time discussing these and other image-tarnishing disasters. Each scandal becomes the vehicle to teach the next class of military journalists and public affairs officers what not to do when talking to the press. The school's credo is "maximum disclosure, minimum delay"; its challenge is balancing the military's need for secrecy with the public's right to know.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 8, 2000
WASHINGTON - Vice Adm. John B. Nathman, the new commander of the Navy's air forces in the Pacific, finally reached the end of his rope. He had seen too many aging aircraft trying to keep up with the increased demands of overseas missions. Too many hangars without spare parts. Too much decrepit housing for sailors. So in his change-of-command speech aboard the carrier USS Constellation two weeks ago, he let loose. "We have reached such a low level of funding it will soon be impossible to meet the expectations of this nation," he told hundreds of sailors, Marines and their guests in San Diego.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. command hopes to use the armor and infantry units now reinforcing the Somalian capital to evict heavily armed Somalian militia forces that have surrounded allied bases in downtown Mogadishu.The militia members, loyal to Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid, also control all the main roads. In the past week, they have used their positions to kill and wound American soldiers by laying mines in the roads and shelling the bases with mortars.If the mission succeeds, Pentagon officials said, the allies will no longer be pinned down in this way, and key points throughout Mogadishu's downtown will be dotted with garrisons and monitored with patrols and checkpoints.
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