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NEWS
July 30, 2011
I keep a household budget. If I spend more that I take in, I'm in trouble. Why can't the federal government figure this out too? If the wheels of our economy are grinding to a halt, then it makes sense to cut expenses. But why is our humongous military outlay never on the table? We're engaged in three wars, Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya. We have bases all over the world. We have a huge fleet of aircraft carriers and other vessels. In fact, when I shop at Safeway on Boston Street, I can see two large gray military ships docked across the harbor.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 27, 2014
In this current legislative season, the Maryland General Assembly had an opportunity to support proposed legislation which would establish a Futures Commission to help our state develop a strategy for dealing with potential military cuts. The Future Commission was based on best practices from the U.S. Department of Defense and as the state with the fourth greatest dependency on military spending, there are concerns that defense draw downs could potentially create difficult economic shocks for many workers and communities in Maryland.
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NEWS
January 25, 2013
Letter writer Steve Buff writes that military spending is bankrupting the country ("Military spending is bankrupting the country," Jan. 20). But according to the Congressional Budget Office, military spending doesn't appear to be the problem. The CBO says that federal receipts for fiscal 2012 are $2.5 trillion but that federal outlays are $3.6 trillion. That's a $1.1 trillion deficit. Of the $3.6 trillion being spent, 57 percent is for entitlements. Defense (of which military spending is but a part)
NEWS
March 1, 2014
As a peace activist, I am skeptical of the alleged cutbacks in military spending. I remember the "peace dividend" which never happened. Then I read "Pentagon cuts could affect Maryland" (Feb. 25). The article was misleading. Most economists will tell you that you can get more bang for the buck if tax dollars go instead to non-military investments such as Baltimore's infrastructure. For example, Maryland could really benefit if investments in renewable energy allow the state to slowly wean itself away from coal, gas and oil. Our Maryland senators and members of the House of Delegates must step up and support SB493/HB738, "Economic Development: Commission on Maryland's Future.
NEWS
April 15, 2012
On April 17, I will be protesting war taxes at Baltimore's main post office. I realize that taxes fund many good programs - education, environment and diplomacy. But sadly when 57 percent of the federal budget goes to the Pentagon, the government's priorities are out of touch with the pressing problems facing its citizens. Instead of investing in a clean energy future and prioritizing human and environmental needs, we are somehow still caught in the outdated and dangerous thinking of the past.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
A pair of reports critical of military spending — on items as diverse as health care and dried meat — are part of the latest round of scrutiny of the Defense Department's budget as the fiscal cliff approaches. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said in a report this month that military compensation over the past decade increased faster than the rate of inflation and, in some years, the growth rate of private-sector wages and salaries. Another report, by Sen. Tom Coburn, outlined what the Oklahoma Republican sees as wasteful or redundant military expenditures, including the military's creation of its own beef jerky.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 30, 2014
Editor: I'm glad to see our elected leaders in Washington have approved a plan to allow the federal government to spend money through 2014. I was particularly pleased to see that Congress has restored some money for Head Start and other investments in the health of our communities and has refused to give the Pentagon all the money that it was asking for. Congress now has an opportunity to use the regular legislative process enshrined in...
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 5, 2007
BEIJING -- China announced yesterday a 17.8 percent jump in military spending for 2007, its largest in a decade, less than two months after an anti-satellite missile test sent shock waves through foreign capitals. The increase occurs after repeated criticism from the Bush administration that Beijing has not been adequately forthcoming in explaining its long-term military objectives. Jiang Enzhu, a government spokesman, told reporters at the Great Hall of the People that China's latest $44.9 billion budget was in line with economic growth and did not threaten the rest of the world.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | March 27, 1991
BEIJING -- China, its national budget already awash in a record amount of red ink, plans this year to increase its military spending and largely stick by its huge subsidies to sinking state enterprises in a costly effort to maintain political stability.The net effect of these political decisions, announced yesterday during the annual meeting of China's powerless legislature, probably means unprecedented deficit spending for a nation struggling to extricate itself from an economic morass while keeping a lid on unemployment, inflation, social unrest and perceived threats from anti-socialist elements abroad.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Lost in the debate about the nation's dwindling defense budget is this little mentioned fact: The United States will spend more on its military next year than it did in 1980, at the height of the Cold War.You remember 1980, when the aging Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev ordered 30,000 troops into neighboring Afghanistan, when thousands of Warsaw Pact tanks were poised to invade Western Europe and the Berlin Wall stood guarded by shoot-to-kill East...
NEWS
February 11, 2014
I keep waiting for the Republican Party to show some respect for the poor and to stop doing the bidding of the 1 percent. But then I saw that Republicans cut back funding for food stamps while providing more tax dollars for corporate-operated farms. Even Sun columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. recognizes that the Republican Party needs to be revitalized ( "Nine ideas to revive the Republican Party," Feb. 9). However, his nine tips are hardly the needed elixir. For example, the greatest problem facing this country is wasting tax dollars on military spending and the dirty wars undertaken by our government.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 30, 2014
Editor: I'm glad to see our elected leaders in Washington have approved a plan to allow the federal government to spend money through 2014. I was particularly pleased to see that Congress has restored some money for Head Start and other investments in the health of our communities and has refused to give the Pentagon all the money that it was asking for. Congress now has an opportunity to use the regular legislative process enshrined in...
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
A coalition that advocates for cuts to military spending is calling on Maryland to establish a military downsizing commission to help the state deal with the result of reductions already underway. Fund Our Communities, made up of 60-some political, veteran, faith and union organizations, said Wednesday that it is asking legislators to launch a jobs-focused commission "tasked with developing plans and policies to ensure a competitive advantage for Maryland" as military spending falls.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 1, 2013
After all the thunder and lightning signifying nothing but more Republican obstructionism, former Sen. Chuck Hagel has taken over at the Pentagon, vowing a realistic approach to America's military role in the world. Not surprisingly, he indicated he will pursue President Barack Obama's course of selective engagement, in contrast to the interventionism of the previous Republican administration, although he didn't specifically mention its war of choice in Iraq and other misadventurism.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
Letter writer Steve Buff writes that military spending is bankrupting the country ("Military spending is bankrupting the country," Jan. 20). But according to the Congressional Budget Office, military spending doesn't appear to be the problem. The CBO says that federal receipts for fiscal 2012 are $2.5 trillion but that federal outlays are $3.6 trillion. That's a $1.1 trillion deficit. Of the $3.6 trillion being spent, 57 percent is for entitlements. Defense (of which military spending is but a part)
NEWS
January 23, 2013
I read Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column ("Obama economics: More government means more growth," June 20) with interest and disbelief. Well, not really. But his comment at the end about the "left's dangerous love affair with ever-higher taxes" brought a smile to my face. Is Mr. Ehrlich not aware that President Barack Obama followed the Republicans' call for lower taxes to fix the problems left by his predecessor? Mr. Obama cut taxes over and over again to the point that we now have the lowest tax rate seen in the United States in more than 60 years!
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush's budget for next year would boost defense spending by $19 billion, or about 5 percent, including more money for missile defense, special operations forces to fight terrorism and protection against chemical and biological warfare, officials said yesterday. The military budget, which makes spending projections for the next six years, shows a decrease in spending for major weapons programs, including the Air Force's F/A-22 stealth attack aircraft and Navy ships.
NEWS
January 5, 2013
Letter writer William Smith is right to point out that Republicans are to blame for the flaws in the nation's health reform law ("Ehrlich denies GOP fault in flawed health care system," Jan. 3). I hope all your readers took note. It's the military's massive waste that is bleeding our economy. It has tanks it doesn't need, planes it doesn't fly and ships it doesn't use. Aircraft carriers and submarines are about all we really need. The Republicans like wars because they can build all these weapons and their rich supporters can make more money.
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