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By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
He duped FBI agents and small-town cops, students and child advocates, volunteer firefighters and war veterans into thinking he was a retired colonel in Army special operations who had fought terrorists and insurgents from Kabul to Bogota. William G. Hillar packed rooms and pocketed speaking fees in big cities and tiny towns from Maryland to California, spending a dozen years spinning tall tales about the mujahedin, drug lords and his own daughter being kidnapped, sold into sex slavery and killed.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
When she was in 10th grade, Risa Kelemer made up her mind: She wanted to serve in the army. The Israeli army. A member of Congregation Shomrei Emunah in Greenspring and a student at Yeshivat Rambam in Park Heights, the Baltimore native visited the Jewish state regularly throughout her childhood. She left her family to spend 10th grade at a school in Haifa. On returning home, she took up running to build strength and endurance, and began contacting authorities to ask about enlisting in the Israel Defense Forces.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Despite the sneers of MSNBC hosts and the disdainful manner of White House Press Secretary Jay Carney, Benghazi matters. And it matters in ways we don't yet even understand - deep, fractious ways that reveal a major front in the culture war almost no one seems to understand or want to even talk about. The "blue news/red news" dichotomy that some have focused on is pretty obvious stuff. Fox thinks it's a big story, while MSNBC mocks Fox for thinking it's a big story. CNN isn't sure what it thinks about anything except the missing plane.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Despite the sneers of MSNBC hosts and the disdainful manner of White House Press Secretary Jay Carney, Benghazi matters. And it matters in ways we don't yet even understand - deep, fractious ways that reveal a major front in the culture war almost no one seems to understand or want to even talk about. The "blue news/red news" dichotomy that some have focused on is pretty obvious stuff. Fox thinks it's a big story, while MSNBC mocks Fox for thinking it's a big story. CNN isn't sure what it thinks about anything except the missing plane.
NEWS
By Paul Marx | May 24, 2010
With the revelation that Richard Blumenthal, the U.S. Senate candidate in Connecticut, received five draft deferments during the Vietnam War, and with the country now involved in two wars, the draft has become a subject of renewed interest. Mr. Blumenthal apparently did not oppose the war on principle. He seems to have requested the deferments for two reasons: He did not want to take the chance of putting himself at risk in the war zone, and he did not want his blossoming career interrupted.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler disparaged Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown 's military service , drawing outrage from a veterans group Monday as the two top Democrats contending for the governor's mansion clashed over Brown's work history. A political action group that represents veterans - and has endorsed Brown - demanded an apology from Gansler after he suggested Brown's work as a military lawyer in Iraq was not “a real job.” Gansler's campaign, meanwhile, criticized Brown for omitting a brief stint at the investment bank Merrill Lynch from his official biography on the state's website.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
Joseph Bathgate calls them "the Hollywood questions. " When college classmates learn he was a machine gunner for the Marine Corps for two tours in Iraq, they want to know: Did anyone ever shoot at you? Ever get hit? And there's the big one. You ever kill anyone? "It's unusual, I understand that, what I've done," says Bathgate, 24, of Dundalk, now out of the military and studying kinesiology at Towson University. "Still, it's annoying. … Naturally, I feel different" from the other, mostly younger students on campus.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN REPORTER | July 25, 2008
The Department of Veterans Affairs plans to provide full disability payments for Lou Gehrig's disease, tacitly acknowledging for the first time a generalized link between the fatal neurological disorder and military service. Veterans and patient advocates have advocated the change for years, citing studies showing that former soldiers are more likely than the general population to contract the disease, formally known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. The VA already extends full compensation to ALS-stricken veterans of the first Persian Gulf war, who, according to a study earlier this decade, are twice as likely as other service members to contract the disease.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2000
The nations' three military academies have promoted themselves for decades as the schools that train the "future leaders of tomorrow," producing career officers equipped with an elite - and free - military education. But recent budget cuts, low morale and the tightest labor market in 30 years have contributed to a growing number of departures from the military, not just of young officers, but of those whom military officials most counted on to stay: the academies' alumni. Academy graduates have become among the most sought-after workers in the world, offering leadership experience, technical training and an almost guaranteed sense of personal responsibility.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2011
In two short weeks, Charles Edward Ridgley Jr., would have been home from Afghanistan, preparing to see his daughter walk across her high school graduation stage. Instead, his family is readying itself for a final goodbye to the fallen Army captain, who was killed by a suicide bomber over the weekend in his first overseas assignment. Media reports say the Taliban have claimed responsibility for the attack Saturday that killed Captain Ridgley and four others. A statement from Fort Richardson says a suicide bomber dressed as a soldier infiltrated the base in the eastern province of Nangarhar.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 24, 2014
Now that veterans groups have condemned Doug Gansler for disparaging Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's military service, followed by Brown calling the attorney general's remarks "reckless and irresponsible," we can start to measure the consequence of Gansler's latest misstep in his quest to be Maryland's next governor. Knocking a veteran? On its surface, it sounds like a low blow - Gansler, the attorney general, suggesting that Brown's stint in Iraq as a military lawyer wasn't "a real job. " Here's what Gansler said Monday about his chief rival in the Democratic primary at a candidates forum in Bethesda: "I'm running against somebody who has never managed anything, never run anything.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Making a rare direct reply Tuesday to an attack by a rival candidate for governor, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown labeled "reckless and irresponsible" remarks by Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler suggesting that Brown's service in Iraq was not a real job. Meanwhile, a veterans organization stepped up its attack on Gansler over the comments, accusing him of "swiftboating" the lieutenant governor. Brown went on the "C4 Show" on WBAL radio Tuesday to comment on Gansler's campaign volley a day earlier, in which he questioned whether Brown has the experience to be governor.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler disparaged Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown 's military service , drawing outrage from a veterans group Monday as the two top Democrats contending for the governor's mansion clashed over Brown's work history. A political action group that represents veterans - and has endorsed Brown - demanded an apology from Gansler after he suggested Brown's work as a military lawyer in Iraq was not “a real job.” Gansler's campaign, meanwhile, criticized Brown for omitting a brief stint at the investment bank Merrill Lynch from his official biography on the state's website.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
CARLSON: Air Force Airman 1st Class Nicholas R. Carlson graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. Carlson completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.
NEWS
September 12, 2013
Another expose on the Naval Academy makes front page news ("Mids' getaways an open secret," Sept. 8). Three out of 5,000 midshipmen have been accused of sexual assault. How many in our civilian colleges and universities? How about this front page headline: "U.S. Naval Academy graduates 90 percent incoming freshman" and compare that to the 60 percent graduation at civilian schools. Or perhaps The Sun might write a series of articles on the fine young people who endure discipline and commit for five years of military service after graduation.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
One day after being sentenced to 35 years in prison for espionage in the largest breach of classified documents in the nation's history, U.S. soldier Bradley Manning made a request of all of us: to stop calling him Brad, and start calling her Chelsea. "As I transition into this next phase of my life, I want everyone to know the real me. I am Chelsea Manning. I am a female," Manning said in a public statement Thursday. "Given the way that I feel, and have felt since childhood, I want to begin hormone therapy as soon as possible.
NEWS
December 23, 2010
I think the critics of Obamacare have a point that there is a difference between requiring health insurance and requiring car insurance because in the latter case one can simply refuse to drive. But I would rather analogize the requirement of having health insurance with military conscription. Conscription is certainly not voluntary. But people can be exempted from military service if they have a legitimate conscientious objection to military service. So why not let people similarly prove a philosophical, religious or moral objection to being insured in order to be exempted from having to obtain or purchase health insurance?
NEWS
By JEFFREY RECORD | July 31, 1995
Notwithstanding repeated pronouncements over the past several years that the Vietnam War is behind us, the issue of one's military service (or lack of it) during that most divisive war in modern American history will almost surely be raised in the 1996 presidential campaign, as it was in the '88 and '92 campaigns.In 1988, it was revealed that Republican vice presidential candidate Dan Quayle, then a Senate defense hawk with a record of strong support for the Vietnam War, had volunteered for service in the Indiana National Guard during the war.This seemingly patriotic and courageous act was in fact nothing more than a means of escaping the prospect of being sent to Vietnam, since practically no guard units were mobilized during the war. The guard was packed with white, affluent and well-connected young men who did not wish to be unduly inconvenienced by a war for which there was plenty of poor, uneducated -- and truly courageous -- cannon fodder already available.
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