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By Dave Rosenthal | September 22, 2012
Flavorwire has put together an interesting gallery of photos of authors in their young, pre-fame days. Some drip with irony: a smiling Sylvia Plath, and Jack Kerouac (in a tie!) at Horace Mann. Others are disarmingly cute: Samuel Beckett on his high school cricket team, Madeleine L'Engle in her Smith College yearbook, and J.D. Salinger at military school. One of the yearbook entries -- for Maurice Sendak -- is prescient. It reads: Your delightful drawings make us all gay/A famous arftist you'll be someday. 
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SPORTS
By Pete Barrett and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Life is a lot different for Worth Smith than many undergraduates across the nation. The Navy junior men's basketball player's life is very regimented.  Every day, the Navy forward wakes up, showers and he shaves. He dresses sharp, and makes sure his shoes are clean.  At 7 a.m., Smith heads to formation, then breakfast, then class from 7:55 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., and lunch.   Between lunch and class resuming, Smith and his teammates watch film. Once class ends, around 3:30 p.m., he goes straight to practice, then back to formation, dinner, and study time.  “There is a lot of stuff you have to do, a lot of stuff on your plate, and they expect you to be able to do it all,” Smith said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Chances are you've never heard of Spencer Lofranco. But chances are that's going to change this year. At 21, the Toronto native is about to have what promises to be a pretty impressive rookie season. In addition to his first film, Trevor White's "Jamesy Boy," which was filmed on location throughout the Baltimore area and opens today, he's also in Adam Rodgers' "At Middleton," opening Jan. 31. And this past Monday in Australia, he started working on his third feature, "Unbroken," a biopic of Olympic runner and World War II POW Louis Zamperini.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Chances are you've never heard of Spencer Lofranco. But chances are that's going to change this year. At 21, the Toronto native is about to have what promises to be a pretty impressive rookie season. In addition to his first film, Trevor White's "Jamesy Boy," which was filmed on location throughout the Baltimore area and opens today, he's also in Adam Rodgers' "At Middleton," opening Jan. 31. And this past Monday in Australia, he started working on his third feature, "Unbroken," a biopic of Olympic runner and World War II POW Louis Zamperini.
NEWS
June 21, 1991
A few weeks ago, President Bush, congratulating the 1,000 female graduates of West Point, called the U.S. military the "greatest equal opportunity employer around." Someone ought to let Judge Jackson Kiser know. Kiser, a U.S. District Court judge in Roanoke, Va., ruled this week that Virginia Military Institute's 152-year-old male-only policy should remain intact.Fifteen months ago the Justice Department brought a sex-discrimination case against VMI, charging that the school -- whose budget is one-third taxpayer funded -- violated the 14th amendment of the Constitution by refusing to admit women.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Gavin Stephenson was admittedly perplexed. The 6-foot-3, 185-pound combo guard played well for Crusader Nation on the AAU circuit over the summer, but attention from college programs was surprisingly minimal. “I would text [Crusader Nation] coach [ Fred McCathorine ] all the time -- 'You hear anything? You hear anything?' I only got a couple calls from a couple schools,” Stephenson said. “I was starting to get nervous. Then during the season, I only heard from a few schools.” Midway through his senior season at Atholton, Stephenson, who spent his first three years of high school at Mount St. Joseph, said that he began to explore the possibility of attending prep school next year.
SPORTS
By Pete Barrett and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Life is a lot different for Worth Smith than many undergraduates across the nation. The Navy junior men's basketball player's life is very regimented.  Every day, the Navy forward wakes up, showers and he shaves. He dresses sharp, and makes sure his shoes are clean.  At 7 a.m., Smith heads to formation, then breakfast, then class from 7:55 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., and lunch.   Between lunch and class resuming, Smith and his teammates watch film. Once class ends, around 3:30 p.m., he goes straight to practice, then back to formation, dinner, and study time.  “There is a lot of stuff you have to do, a lot of stuff on your plate, and they expect you to be able to do it all,” Smith said.
SPORTS
By Kevin Modesti and Kevin Modesti,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | September 6, 1998
NORTHRIDGE, Calif. -- Marcus Brady, the redshirt-freshman quarterback, came to Cal State Northridge by way of Navy. That's the part his new teammates find hard to believe.They understand why he left the U.S. Naval Academy before completing the "Plebe Summer" boot camp. But why on earth or sea did he sign up for a military school in the first place?Marcus just isn't soldier material. He's so quiet, so placid, so courteous, you imagine that in the event of war, he'd be the etiquette officer, in charge of requisitioning the napkins.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2012
Nine months before Bobby Ross came out of retirement to coach football at Army in December 2003, the United States began its military involvement in Iraq. As he dug into his new job at West Point, Ross was thinking more about how to rebuild a team that had lost all its games the previous season than the escalating casualties of war. Soon enough, Ross learned the success of Army football and whether the United States was actively engaged in war were often intertwined. Though it had not happened during the two World Wars -- the Cadets won their three national championships at the end of and immediately after World War II -- Army's football struggles in the early 1970s were often tied to the unpopularity of and protests against the Vietnam War. When Ross began to recruit in the winter and spring of 2004, the conversations he had with parents of prospective players often turned toward what was happening in Iraq.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | August 30, 1995
The gray-haired Chicago man's memory was jogged by Shannon Faulkner's miserable experience at the Citadel, the military college in South Carolina.Like Faulkner, he had once gone through the misery of being a freshman cadet at a military school.It was a high school, not a college, but it was based on the same principle: Newcomers were treated like dirt by upperclassmen.Like Faulkner, he was eager and excited in the beginning. He looked forward to the challenge. And, like Faulkner, he had to deal with being different.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2012
Nine months before Bobby Ross came out of retirement to coach football at Army in December 2003, the United States began its military involvement in Iraq. As he dug into his new job at West Point, Ross was thinking more about how to rebuild a team that had lost all its games the previous season than the escalating casualties of war. Soon enough, Ross learned the success of Army football and whether the United States was actively engaged in war were often intertwined. Though it had not happened during the two World Wars -- the Cadets won their three national championships at the end of and immediately after World War II -- Army's football struggles in the early 1970s were often tied to the unpopularity of and protests against the Vietnam War. When Ross began to recruit in the winter and spring of 2004, the conversations he had with parents of prospective players often turned toward what was happening in Iraq.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | September 22, 2012
Flavorwire has put together an interesting gallery of photos of authors in their young, pre-fame days. Some drip with irony: a smiling Sylvia Plath, and Jack Kerouac (in a tie!) at Horace Mann. Others are disarmingly cute: Samuel Beckett on his high school cricket team, Madeleine L'Engle in her Smith College yearbook, and J.D. Salinger at military school. One of the yearbook entries -- for Maurice Sendak -- is prescient. It reads: Your delightful drawings make us all gay/A famous arftist you'll be someday. 
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Gavin Stephenson was admittedly perplexed. The 6-foot-3, 185-pound combo guard played well for Crusader Nation on the AAU circuit over the summer, but attention from college programs was surprisingly minimal. “I would text [Crusader Nation] coach [ Fred McCathorine ] all the time -- 'You hear anything? You hear anything?' I only got a couple calls from a couple schools,” Stephenson said. “I was starting to get nervous. Then during the season, I only heard from a few schools.” Midway through his senior season at Atholton, Stephenson, who spent his first three years of high school at Mount St. Joseph, said that he began to explore the possibility of attending prep school next year.
EXPLORE
September 19, 2011
G.I. Jobs has announced Harford Community College has made its list of 2012 Military Friendly Schools again. The list honors the top 20 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools deemed to be doing the most to embrace U.S. military veterans as students. For the first time, G.I. Jobs incorporated a survey of student veterans that provides prospective military students with insight into the student veteran experience at a particular institution based on peer reviews from current students.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | June 8, 2008
Federal lawmakers in Maryland are pushing for a national database to catalog sexual assaults at the U.S. Naval Academy and other military colleges, months after a government agency found that incidents were inconsistently reported. The effort comes after years of reports finding a hostile climate for women at the Naval Academy in Annapolis and other attempts, which have met mixed success, at combating sexual assaults there. Legislation recently introduced by Rep. Elijah E. Cummings would require the Defense Department to create the database along with standards for reporting sexual assaults.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | September 9, 2007
It was a small moment, but decades later, Martha Thorn remembers it well. Decorated Vietnam War veteran and best-selling author James Webb was returning to the Naval Academy in the 1980s and had to prepare for an interview in Annapolis with Good Morning America. Webb, now a Democratic senator from Virginia, wanted a refresher on the "Boat School" from which he had graduated in 1968, so he sent a host of questions to the academy's public affairs office, hoping to be ready for anything the morning show would throw at him. Thorn prepared "gobs and gobs of information" and faxed it to Webb just before the interview, and when he arrived at the academy, he noticed her name tag and thanked her graciously.
EXPLORE
September 19, 2011
G.I. Jobs has announced Harford Community College has made its list of 2012 Military Friendly Schools again. The list honors the top 20 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools deemed to be doing the most to embrace U.S. military veterans as students. For the first time, G.I. Jobs incorporated a survey of student veterans that provides prospective military students with insight into the student veteran experience at a particular institution based on peer reviews from current students.
NEWS
By Scott Winokur | June 26, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO - When I was bad, my parents threatened me with military school, which usually shut me up. I took them seriously. I had no idea of the cost of what I was sure would be a private penal colony. But they were no more likely to send me to military school than to Ft. Lauderdale on spring break. Nonetheless, I spent many morose hours curled up with the New York Times Magazine scanning its inky, small-type ads for military schools. They've been upbeat. In a recent issue: "Positive peer pressure and brotherhood within a structured setting."
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun reporter | December 2, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- The Navy seniors can taste it now. They are one victory away from doing what might have seemed unthinkable several years ago. Amid the pageantry and the sellout crowd that will offer a backdrop to the 107th meeting between Army and Navy today at Lincoln Financial Field, the Midshipmen insist that they will carry a single-minded, tunnel-vision focus into the stadium. Seniors such as linebacker Tyler Tidwell and left tackle Matt Pritchett acknowledge that the thought of becoming the first class in academy history to go 8-0 against Army and Air Force is a thread that has tied this season together.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 27, 2004
WASHINGTON - With only two justices voting to hear the case, the Supreme Court yesterday refused to consider restoring the traditional supper prayers at Virginia Military Institute, a public college. The Supreme Court's action is the latest in a long line of decisions that tell school officials they must not promote religion or lead group prayers - even, as in this instance, among college students preparing for military careers. Last year, the normally conservative 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., ruled that the supper prayers at VMI violated the First Amendment's ban on an "establishment of religion."
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