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NEWS
September 28, 2003
Elsewhere Nawabzada Nasrullah Khan, 85, the head of Pakistan's main opposition alliance and one of its greatest advocates of democracy, died Friday of a heart attack in Islamabad, Pakistan, his party's spokesman said. Mr. Khan's career spanned half a century and saw him take on several of Pakistan's military dictatorships. He was head of Pakistan's main opposition group, the Alliance for the Restoration of Democracy. He was also the head of his own party, the Pakistan Democratic Party.
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NEWS
July 1, 2013
The long simmering tensions between Egypt's Islamist-backed President Mohamed Morsi and liberal and secular opposition groups erupted over the weekend into violent street demonstrations that have plunged the country into crisis. Unless Mr. Morsi can address the protesters' demands for a more inclusive government that represents all the country's political factions, Egypt's fragile new democracy could collapse into chaos and usher in a return to military rule. Two years ago, Egyptians gathered by the hundreds of thousands in Cairo's Tahrir Square and other cities to force an end to former President Hosni Mubarak's 40-year autocratic rule.
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NEWS
May 27, 1992
Thailand's booming middle class, the "Mobile Phone Mob" that went to the barricades to the sound of beepers, has emerged triumphant after bloody clashes in which the ruling military made the mistake of shooting at its own people. Gen. Suchinda Krapayoon, who earlier had dismissed anti-government demonstrators as "spent boxers," has himself been forced to retire from the ring, his military caste disgraced and repudiated, his ears ringing with demands that he be tried for murder.What has happened in Thailand has happened, with variations, in many parts of Asia.
NEWS
March 27, 2010
CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. - A military judge on Friday refused to dismiss charges against a Marine who led a squad that killed 24 Iraqi men, women and children in the town of Haditha after a bomb killed a Marine. The judge, Lt. Col. David Jones, had ruled Tuesday it was possible that two generals who brought charges against Staff Sgt. Frank Wuterich had been subject to what the military calls undue command influence. But Friday, Jones ruled that he saw no indication of actual influence on Gen. James Mattis or retired Lt. Gen. Samuel Helland.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
The long simmering tensions between Egypt's Islamist-backed President Mohamed Morsi and liberal and secular opposition groups erupted over the weekend into violent street demonstrations that have plunged the country into crisis. Unless Mr. Morsi can address the protesters' demands for a more inclusive government that represents all the country's political factions, Egypt's fragile new democracy could collapse into chaos and usher in a return to military rule. Two years ago, Egyptians gathered by the hundreds of thousands in Cairo's Tahrir Square and other cities to force an end to former President Hosni Mubarak's 40-year autocratic rule.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | June 21, 1993
Airman Jackson was a mess hall cook. Oh, he could load, ai and fire a carbine. And if he was sober, he might even have hit someone. But that wasn't really what he was trained to do.Nevertheless, he had to pull night guard duty like everyone else. And like everyone else, he hated it. Especially since the Korean War had ended and he was boozily waiting to be rotated back to the States.So that night he was on a lonely flight line, watching over a row of fighter planes. He didn't know why they needed watching.
NEWS
March 27, 2010
CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. - A military judge on Friday refused to dismiss charges against a Marine who led a squad that killed 24 Iraqi men, women and children in the town of Haditha after a bomb killed a Marine. The judge, Lt. Col. David Jones, had ruled Tuesday it was possible that two generals who brought charges against Staff Sgt. Frank Wuterich had been subject to what the military calls undue command influence. But Friday, Jones ruled that he saw no indication of actual influence on Gen. James Mattis or retired Lt. Gen. Samuel Helland.
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | March 25, 2002
WASHINGTON -- With the release last week of the rules governing the administration's new military tribunals, President Bush stepped forward to answer widespread criticism of the tribunals as un-American and abusive. He reminded Americans that they should judge the need for the tribunals on the basis of those who would be brought before them. "Remember," he advised, "these are the ones in Guantanamo Bay, [they] are killers, they don't share the same values that we share." It was a statement that more than any other captured the growing divide between the administration and its critics over issues such as the tribunals.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 25, 1990
SAO PAULO, Brazil -- Dozens of government medical examiners are facing uncomfortable new nationwide scrutiny, accused by human rights activists of falsifying autopsy reports to cover up torture and murder by Brazil's secret police during two decades of military rule.One medical examiner has lost his job, others have had their offices invaded by angry activists, and dozens have come under public censure since municipal authorities here last month opened a mass grave believed to contain the bodies of several dozen murdered government opponents in an attempt to clarify the fate of the city's "disappeared."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 1999
ABUJA, Nigeria -- In an exuberant ceremony of martial music and marches, Nigeria's military ruler turned over power to an elected leader yesterday, opening an era of civilian government in the nation where one in six Africans lives.Seconds after he was handed a copy of Nigeria's 24-day-old Constitution and 20 years after he stepped down as its military ruler, Olusegun Obasanjo, a retired general, was sworn in as president.After the ceremony, in a symbolic retirement of the military from politics, the outgoing head of state, Gen. Abdulsalam Abubakar, was escorted in a motorcade by the military's highest-ranking officers to his hometown of Minna, about 75 miles west of the capital.
NEWS
September 28, 2003
Elsewhere Nawabzada Nasrullah Khan, 85, the head of Pakistan's main opposition alliance and one of its greatest advocates of democracy, died Friday of a heart attack in Islamabad, Pakistan, his party's spokesman said. Mr. Khan's career spanned half a century and saw him take on several of Pakistan's military dictatorships. He was head of Pakistan's main opposition group, the Alliance for the Restoration of Democracy. He was also the head of his own party, the Pakistan Democratic Party.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 21, 2002
SEOUL, South Korea - In a case that has sparked the largest anti-American rallies seen here in years, an Army sergeant was acquitted yesterday in a U.S. military court of criminal negligence in the deaths of two South Korean girls who were crushed by a 50-ton armored vehicle. Sgt. Fernando Nino, the vehicle's commander, was found not guilty of negligent homicide in the deaths of Shim Mi-son and Shin Hyo-soon, both 14, who were hit on a narrow road north of Seoul. Today, a military jury will hear the case of the vehicle's driver, Sgt. Mark Walker.
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | March 25, 2002
WASHINGTON -- With the release last week of the rules governing the administration's new military tribunals, President Bush stepped forward to answer widespread criticism of the tribunals as un-American and abusive. He reminded Americans that they should judge the need for the tribunals on the basis of those who would be brought before them. "Remember," he advised, "these are the ones in Guantanamo Bay, [they] are killers, they don't share the same values that we share." It was a statement that more than any other captured the growing divide between the administration and its critics over issues such as the tribunals.
NEWS
October 29, 1999
THE NEW government, though not democratically elected, is popular because the preceding regime was so bad. The reformers pledge to end corruption, hold the country together, restart the economy and restore national honor.That could be Pakistan, where Gen. Pervaiz Musharraf made himself absolute ruler after a coup.It equally describes Indonesia, where Abdurrahman Wahid was indirectly elected president and Megawati Sukarnoputri vice president last week, replacing the transitional successor to a dictator.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 1999
ABUJA, Nigeria -- In an exuberant ceremony of martial music and marches, Nigeria's military ruler turned over power to an elected leader yesterday, opening an era of civilian government in the nation where one in six Africans lives.Seconds after he was handed a copy of Nigeria's 24-day-old Constitution and 20 years after he stepped down as its military ruler, Olusegun Obasanjo, a retired general, was sworn in as president.After the ceremony, in a symbolic retirement of the military from politics, the outgoing head of state, Gen. Abdulsalam Abubakar, was escorted in a motorcade by the military's highest-ranking officers to his hometown of Minna, about 75 miles west of the capital.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 28, 1999
NYANYA, Nigeria -- Schoolteacher Rakmat M. Sani lent her old, ink-stained desk to the cause of democracy and historic change here yesterday.It was placed on the veranda outside the dingy primary school classroom in which she teaches 10-year-olds, so that voters in this depressed township could choose a civilian to replace this country's military head of state.The presidential choice was between former military leader Gen. Olusegun Obasanjo, 61, who campaigned as a democrat, and Olu Falae, 60, a Yale-trained former finance minister in a military regime who ran as an economic reformer.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
The oldest flying club in the Army has sued the Army to be allowed to stay at Tipton Airfield on Fort Meade after Howard and Anne Arundel counties take over.The Fort Meade Flying Activity filed the class-action suit Thursday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, arguing that after the property no longer belongs to the Army, the service has no authority to bar the club from the field.The 366-acre airfield, in Anne Arundel County near the southeastern portion of Howard County, shuts down today as part of a federal base closure effort to cut defense spending.
NEWS
October 29, 1999
THE NEW government, though not democratically elected, is popular because the preceding regime was so bad. The reformers pledge to end corruption, hold the country together, restart the economy and restore national honor.That could be Pakistan, where Gen. Pervaiz Musharraf made himself absolute ruler after a coup.It equally describes Indonesia, where Abdurrahman Wahid was indirectly elected president and Megawati Sukarnoputri vice president last week, replacing the transitional successor to a dictator.
NEWS
January 2, 1996
PRESIDENT KIM YOUNG SAM of South Korea has consolidated enough legitimacy to put on trial an entire era of military rule, spanning the years from 1979 to 1993. The effort tears at South Korea's fabric of prosperity and confidence, yet confirms it as well.Last July, prosecutors refused to press charges against the former presidents Chun Doo Hwan (1981-8) and Roh Tae Woo (1988-93), citing the need for national unity as North Korea remains a mystery and menace. But in late November, President Kim instructed the ruling Liberal Democratic parliamentarians to enact a law making the two presidents liable for crimes dating to 1979, and prosecutors named new investigators.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 1995
LAGOS, Nigeria -- Defying international pressure for immediate democratic reforms and an end to human rights abuses, Nigerian leader Gen. Sani Abacha announced yesterday that his military regime will stay in power for three more years before allowing civilian rule.The hard-line stance is expected to further entrench oppressive military rule in this sub-Sahara African nation crippled by grave political and economic crises.In a long-awaited speech that was peppered with criticism of his foes here and abroad, General Abacha refused to release scores of political prisoners -- specifically Moshood K. O. Abiola, the prominent pro-democracy leader who was imprisoned 15 months ago.Mr.
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