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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
A former Naval Academy midshipman was sentenced to six months in military prison and dismissed from the Navy on Thursday after he was convicted of raping a female classmate. Midshipman 3rd Class Patrick Edmond, 20, was found guilty of raping the female midshipman in her dorm room last October and of lying to military officials. The native of Jackson, Miss., was dismissed from the academy after a seven-member military panel handed down its verdict. He was attending classes at the academy until the conviction.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
A former Naval Academy midshipman was sentenced to six months in military prison and dismissed from the Navy on Thursday after he was convicted of raping a female classmate. Midshipman 3rd Class Patrick Edmond, 20, was found guilty of raping the female midshipman in her dorm room last October and of lying to military officials. The native of Jackson, Miss., was dismissed from the academy after a seven-member military panel handed down its verdict. He was attending classes at the academy until the conviction.
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NEWS
By Andrea Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
An Army doctor convicted of disobeying orders to deploy to Afghanistan because he questioned whether Barack Obama is eligible to be president was sentenced Thursday to six months in a military prison followed by dismissal from the Army. Lt. Col. Terrence L. Lakin stood stoically in his dress uniform as an eight-person military jury handed down the punishment, which also includes forfeiting pay and allowances. He was given a few minutes with his parents and brothers before being taken into custody.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 4, 2011
President Barack Obama, who takes an Osama bin Laden victory lap at Ground Zero today, ought to just come out and say the plan was to kill the guy all along. Stop with all the who-struck-John about what happened during the "firefight" inside bin Laden's lair in Pakistan — whether the world's most wanted man "resisted" his would-be captors when he wasn't armed. As details emerge from what a White House aide called the "fog of combat," execution appears to have been the order of the day. A video or photograph might prove me wrong — today the White House might say bin Laden threw a lamp at an invading Navy Seal — but let's not buy any pretense that our guys were told to capture him for trial.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 19, 2001
The Last Castle is a pea-brained dinosaur of a movie, big and stupid and lumbering. It's a mishmash of The Bridge on the River Kwai, From Here to Eternity and The Great Escape, with everything complex and entertaining siphoned off. Robert Redford stars as a three-star Army general who embodies all military virtues except obedience. His disregard for orders and his leadership of a disastrous overseas raid land him in a military prison run by a colonel, James Gandolfini. This warden is the general's opposite: a martinet who demands total control of his inmates and achieves it by any means necessary, including murder.
NEWS
June 15, 2006
Prisoners found way to stop suffering Three prisoners at the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have finally managed to leave their misery behind by successfully committing suicide ("Investigations begin into suicides," June 12). Is anyone surprised? Even without physical torture, the hopelessness of being deprived of human contact with friends and family for four years and with no end in sight would bring many human beings to the brink of suicide. We are assured that the bodies of the prisoners are going to be treated with the utmost respect.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 3, 2005
FORT HOOD, Texas - Pfc. Lynndie R. England, the young Army reservist whose grinning, thumbs-up image came to symbolize the worst of the Abu Ghraib prison scandal, told a military judge yesterday that she knew the detainee abuses were wrong but went along because of peer pressure. Offering the most ordinary explanation of a scandal that ignited international outrage, England said she posed in some of the widely circulated photographs showing humiliating abuses of Iraqi detainees to placate her then-boyfriend and others from her Maryland-based unit.
NEWS
By Steven Thomma and Steven Thomma,McClatchy Newspapers | November 12, 2009
WASHINGTON - - President Barack Obama's decision to close the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, military prison by Jan. 22 was followed by a series of mistakes and missteps by his administration that will delay the prison's closure for months, according to a report from a policy organization with close ties to the White House. Those mistakes - which ranged from initially having too few people on board to handle the workload to misreading Congress - have put the timetable months behind schedule and will push the prison's closure well beyond the January deadline, which Obama announced with great fanfare two days after he took office.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 8, 2004
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence investigators who complained about the treatment of detainees in Iraq were harassed and threatened by U.S. military prison officials, the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency has told Pentagon officials. Vice Adm. Lowell E. Jacoby said in a memo, made public by the ACLU yesterday, that his DIA interrogators and de-briefers saw prisoners with "burn marks on their backs" and some suffering from "kidney pain." He said two of his DIA subordinates saw prison personnel "punch a prisoner in the face to the point the individual needed medical attention."
NEWS
By Anne E. Kornblut and Peter Finn and The Washington Post | March 5, 2010
President Barack Obama's advisers are nearing a recommendation that Khalid Sheik Mohammed, the self-proclaimed mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, be prosecuted in a military tribunal, administration officials said, a step that would reverse Attorney General Eric Holder's plan to try him in civilian court in New York City. The president's advisers feel increasingly hemmed in by bipartisan opposition to a federal trial in New York and demands, mainly from Republicans, that Mohammed and his accused co-conspirators remain under military jurisdiction, officials said.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
An Army doctor convicted of disobeying orders to deploy to Afghanistan because he questioned whether Barack Obama is eligible to be president was sentenced Thursday to six months in a military prison followed by dismissal from the Army. Lt. Col. Terrence L. Lakin stood stoically in his dress uniform as an eight-person military jury handed down the punishment, which also includes forfeiting pay and allowances. He was given a few minutes with his parents and brothers before being taken into custody.
NEWS
By Anne E. Kornblut and Peter Finn and The Washington Post | March 5, 2010
President Barack Obama's advisers are nearing a recommendation that Khalid Sheik Mohammed, the self-proclaimed mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, be prosecuted in a military tribunal, administration officials said, a step that would reverse Attorney General Eric Holder's plan to try him in civilian court in New York City. The president's advisers feel increasingly hemmed in by bipartisan opposition to a federal trial in New York and demands, mainly from Republicans, that Mohammed and his accused co-conspirators remain under military jurisdiction, officials said.
NEWS
By Steven Thomma and Steven Thomma,McClatchy Newspapers | November 12, 2009
WASHINGTON - - President Barack Obama's decision to close the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, military prison by Jan. 22 was followed by a series of mistakes and missteps by his administration that will delay the prison's closure for months, according to a report from a policy organization with close ties to the White House. Those mistakes - which ranged from initially having too few people on board to handle the workload to misreading Congress - have put the timetable months behind schedule and will push the prison's closure well beyond the January deadline, which Obama announced with great fanfare two days after he took office.
NEWS
June 15, 2006
Prisoners found way to stop suffering Three prisoners at the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have finally managed to leave their misery behind by successfully committing suicide ("Investigations begin into suicides," June 12). Is anyone surprised? Even without physical torture, the hopelessness of being deprived of human contact with friends and family for four years and with no end in sight would bring many human beings to the brink of suicide. We are assured that the bodies of the prisoners are going to be treated with the utmost respect.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 3, 2005
FORT HOOD, Texas - Pfc. Lynndie R. England, the young Army reservist whose grinning, thumbs-up image came to symbolize the worst of the Abu Ghraib prison scandal, told a military judge yesterday that she knew the detainee abuses were wrong but went along because of peer pressure. Offering the most ordinary explanation of a scandal that ignited international outrage, England said she posed in some of the widely circulated photographs showing humiliating abuses of Iraqi detainees to placate her then-boyfriend and others from her Maryland-based unit.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 8, 2004
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence investigators who complained about the treatment of detainees in Iraq were harassed and threatened by U.S. military prison officials, the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency has told Pentagon officials. Vice Adm. Lowell E. Jacoby said in a memo, made public by the ACLU yesterday, that his DIA interrogators and de-briefers saw prisoners with "burn marks on their backs" and some suffering from "kidney pain." He said two of his DIA subordinates saw prison personnel "punch a prisoner in the face to the point the individual needed medical attention."
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 4, 2011
President Barack Obama, who takes an Osama bin Laden victory lap at Ground Zero today, ought to just come out and say the plan was to kill the guy all along. Stop with all the who-struck-John about what happened during the "firefight" inside bin Laden's lair in Pakistan — whether the world's most wanted man "resisted" his would-be captors when he wasn't armed. As details emerge from what a White House aide called the "fog of combat," execution appears to have been the order of the day. A video or photograph might prove me wrong — today the White House might say bin Laden threw a lamp at an invading Navy Seal — but let's not buy any pretense that our guys were told to capture him for trial.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 14, 2004
WASHINGTON - The prison abuse scandal has fed an international drive to curb power and freedom of action of U.S. forces in Iraq once a caretaker government gains political control of the country on June 30. France's foreign minister has urged that the new government exercise control over the Iraqi armed forces that are being trained and equipped by the United States, reversing a requirement that makes them subordinate to American commanders. In an interview published yesterday in Le Monde, Foreign Minister Michel Barnier said Iraqi leaders "must, at a minimum, be consulted" on U.S. military actions.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 14, 2004
WASHINGTON - The prison abuse scandal has fed an international drive to curb power and freedom of action of U.S. forces in Iraq once a caretaker government gains political control of the country on June 30. France's foreign minister has urged that the new government exercise control over the Iraqi armed forces that are being trained and equipped by the United States, reversing a requirement that makes them subordinate to American commanders. In an interview published yesterday in Le Monde, Foreign Minister Michel Barnier said Iraqi leaders "must, at a minimum, be consulted" on U.S. military actions.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 19, 2001
The Last Castle is a pea-brained dinosaur of a movie, big and stupid and lumbering. It's a mishmash of The Bridge on the River Kwai, From Here to Eternity and The Great Escape, with everything complex and entertaining siphoned off. Robert Redford stars as a three-star Army general who embodies all military virtues except obedience. His disregard for orders and his leadership of a disastrous overseas raid land him in a military prison run by a colonel, James Gandolfini. This warden is the general's opposite: a martinet who demands total control of his inmates and achieves it by any means necessary, including murder.
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