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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Maryland National Guard Sgt. Darren Lebowitz is leaving soon for Afghanistan as many U.S. troops return home. Lebowitz, who has served three tours in Iraq, volunteered for the mission. "I'm a glutton for punishment," he said as he trained Tuesday at this National Guard installation in Central Pennsylvania. As the United States and its coalition partners draw forces out of Afghanistan, more than 250 Maryland guardsmen are heading in. Members of three military police units are preparing for deployments to Kandahar and Bagram, where they will work with Afghan forces, provide security and take on any other assignments that might arise.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
Army officials are investigating a stabbing that occurred at a home on Fort Meade Wednesday afternoon. Military police were called to a home on post at 1 p.m. for a report of a man being stabbed by a soldier, Meade officials said. When police arrived, the suspect barricaded himself in the home. Agents from the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command and Anne Arundel County police officers convinced the man to give himself up. During the barricade situation, Meade Heights Elementary School adjusted its dismissal to accommodate the closure of Reece Road.
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NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | November 15, 1990
Long after the alert went out in August, then was withdrawn, then restored, the waiting and the uncertainty ended today for the members of the 290th Military Police Company when they reported to the Towson National Guard Armory for duty.It is duty that will take them to Saudi Arabia and the prospect of war."I'm just glad the waiting game is over," said a guardsman named Roger, 25."I don't know how I feel about going, but I'm not very happy about leaving home, the people I love here," said Pat, 21, who works in his family's business in the area.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Maryland National Guard Sgt. Darren Lebowitz is leaving soon for Afghanistan as many U.S. troops return home. Lebowitz, who has served three tours in Iraq, volunteered for the mission. "I'm a glutton for punishment," he said as he trained Tuesday at this National Guard installation in Central Pennsylvania. As the United States and its coalition partners draw forces out of Afghanistan, more than 250 Maryland guardsmen are heading in. Members of three military police units are preparing for deployments to Kandahar and Bagram, where they will work with Afghan forces, provide security and take on any other assignments that might arise.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 22, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court cleared the way yesterday for military police to round up civilians who get caught in a military drug bust that is set up outside the boundaries of a base.Without comment, the court turned down an appeal by an Air Force enlisted man's wife challenging her arrest and detention by military investigators after she showed up at an apartment that was the scene of an undercover drug operation.Under a 116-year-old federal law, the military is barred from enforcing civilian laws.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 17, 2001
WASHINGTON - Outfitted with combat boots, Army fatigues and 9 mm pistols, a new cadre of Capitol Hill inhabitants cut a startling silhouette yesterday against the marble landscape of Congress. National Guard military police, with black-and-white "MP" bands on their left arms, had arrived to protect the House and Senate. The last time the Guard carried out a similar assignment was during the riots in Washington that broke out after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 24, 1997
PARIS -- The European Union is expected to send a small military police contingent to Albania to provide security for the delivery of medicine, food, and other aid, European officials said yesterday.The decision may come as early as today, when the foreign ministers of the 15-nation union will discuss the issue in Brussels, Belgium, Dutch government officials said. The Netherlands holds the presidency of the European Union.The plan is to send "hundreds but not thousands" of Western European military police officers or troops assigned to police tasks, the officials said, to see to it that badly needed food and medical supplies get into the right hands.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 21, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The U.S. military announced yesterday that it had charged six military police officers with abusing Iraqi detainees held in Abu Ghraib prison, an institution infamous under former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein for its brutal treatment of prisoners Brig. Gen. Mark Kimmitt said the 800th Military Police Brigade officers were charged with six crimes including cruelty and maltreatment of prisoners, assault, and indecent acts with another, as well as conspiracy and dereliction of duty.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - The 372nd Military Police Company from Cumberland, about 150 Army Reserve soldiers who arrived in Iraq in May and were preparing to return home last week, will remain in the country into June and perhaps well into the summer to provide security for military and civilian convoys, Pentagon officials said yesterday. When the Pentagon extended the yearlong deployments of some 20,000 soldiers in Iraq last week, no Maryland-based soldiers were on the list. Although the company has yet to officially receive its extension order, it will be coming soon, said a Pentagon official, explaining that the military reservists were tapped for extended duty last week but didn't make the list, which included active-duty and reserve soldiers.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
CRESAPTOWN - Lynndie England isn't from this blink-and-miss-it town on the outskirts of Cumberland. Neither is Charles A. Graner Jr. or Ivan "Chip" Frederick, or the other four Army reservists charged with crimes in the Iraqi prisoner abuse scandal. Many people here are quick to note that only a handful of their own served with the 372nd Military Police Company, which is based in this rural community. And they resolutely believe that the actions of a few soldiers shouldn't tarnish the accomplishments of a unit that spent 14 months overseas - especially when those few don't even live around here.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
In the days after his twin's disappearance, police say, Wael Ali led searchers to within feet of his brother's body, telling them he felt "something was wrong there. " Whether police suspect that Ali wanted his friends to find his dead brother or whether they think he was merely trying to cover his tracks is unknown, but the detail is one of several revealed in court documents that charge Ali with first-degree murder in the 2007 killing of his twin brother, Wasel. The documents were made public Friday after Ali was extradited from Georgia to stand trial in Howard County.
NEWS
September 21, 2011
The most deadly terrorist attack on America since Sept. 11, 2011 was by Nadal Hassan, who killed 13 people. Unbelievably, this attack took place at an Army base where for safety reasons no one was allowed to protect themselves. The military police were supposed to do all the protecting. Shamefully, that's not quite how it worked out. It happened that the only one with a gun was a female police officer who responded to a 911 call. Anyone with a gun could have stopped Mr. Hassan in Texas or Jared Lee Loughner in Arizona.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
John M. Vernarelli, who served in Korea and Vietnam as a military police officer and later had a second career as a chef, died Aug. 14 of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Perry Hall resident was 80. Mr. Vernarelli, one of 14 children of Italian immigrants, was born at home on East Chase Street. When he was 16, he tried to enlist in the Army, until military authorities learned his age and he was sent home from Fort Meade to Baltimore. "The next year, on March 27, 1947 — one day after his 17th birthday — he enlisted," said a nephew, Mark Vernarelli, who is a spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correction Services.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | March 17, 2010
I f it is true, as Napoleon said, that an army moves on its stomach, then some Army reservists at Fort Meade will soon be soldiering in style. Sgt. 1st Class James Duff, a food service specialist with the 200th Military Police Command, will be reporting for duty at Fort Meade this month. This is the mess-hall equivalent, I gather, of having Maryland sharpshooter Greivis Vasquez show up on your pickup basketball team. Duff is on a roll. Last week he managed a team of 12 that picked up a potful of medals - four gold, 11 silver and seven bronze - at the U.S. Army's Culinary Arts Competition at Fort Lee, Va. They finished fifth in a field of 12 teams.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | January 11, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Army Lt. Col. Steven L. Jordan, who was court-martialed at Fort Meade in August for his role in the Abu Ghraib prison scandal, has been cleared of his sole criminal conviction, leaving only an official reprimand for the former commander of the notorious Iraqi prison. The action, taken Wednesday by Army Maj. Gen. Richard J. Rowe, commander of the Military District of Washington, eliminates the only criminal finding against any officer for the Abu Ghraib scandal. Rowe's decision prompted complaints that the military justice system is incapable of holding senior officers accountable for the actions of their subordinates.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson | September 4, 2007
A multivehicle accident shut down U.S. 50 on the Eastern Shore in both directions last night, just as the long Labor Day weekend was winding to a close. The accident, which involved five vehicles, occurred about 9 p.m. in Talbot County, according to state police in Easton. Two helicopters were called to the scene to take four victims to hospitals, police said. Police could not initially say on which side of U.S. 50 the accident had occurred or how many people were injured. State highway workers set up detours.
NEWS
February 22, 1995
A county K-9 dog bit and subdued a Severn man who had fled a stolen van with four other men Sunday morning, county police said.Officer Lawrence O'Connor and his K-9 partner, Bubba, were called to help military police at Fort Meade about 1 a.m. The military police had chased the suspects to Buckner Avenue and Mapes Road, where they jumped out of the van, police said.Officer O'Connor and Bubba tracked the men for a third of a mile, then saw one of them trying to escape. After yelling a warning, Officer O'Connor released Bubba, who caught the suspect after a brief struggle, police said.
NEWS
July 16, 2005
As of yesterday, 1,763 U.S. service members have died since the beginning of military operations in March 2003. Latest identifications Army Spc. Benyahmin B. Yahudah, 24, Bogart, Ga.; killed Wednesday when a car bomb detonated near his vehicle in Baghdad; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Ga. Army Pfc. Tim Hines, 21, Fairfield, Ohio; died Thursday from injuries from a...
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | August 30, 2007
On Aug. 22, the same day that Wasel G. Ali's family reported him missing, a manager at the Banana Republic at The Mall in Columbia confronted him about stealing nearly $1,300 in clothing while working at the store. Ali signed a statement admitting to the theft and agreed to return the 27 items of clothing and accessories the next day, according to court records. But he never came back. On Monday, five days after he went missing, Ali's body was found in a wooded area of Columbia. And yesterday, police ruled the death a homicide, the fifth in Howard County this year.
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