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Lorraine Mirabella | October 3, 2013
Sam's Club is waiving membership requirements for military personnel and retirees and their families during the government shutdown. The retailer said Thursday it decided to waive the fees after dozens of commissaries on military bases were closed by the shutdown. "Military personnel, retirees and their families heavily depend on commissaries for low-cost groceries and everyday needs," Sam's Club's announcement said.  The retailer said it planned to waive the fees at Sam's Club locations near military bases until the government re-opens the commissaries.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 25, 2014
"I want a love I can see. That's the only kind that means a thing to me. Don't want a love you have to tell me about. That kind of loving I can sure do without. " -- The Temptations, 1963 A few days ago in an airport restaurant, I saw a scene that has become commonplace in recent years. These soldiers were sitting there talking, waiting for their meal. And this guy on the way out detoured over to them. "Thank you for your service," he said. They nodded, thanked him for thanking them.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
For a year-old restaurant in Glen Burnie, meat goes nicely not only with rubs and barbecue sauces, but also with donations in support of emergency workers and service members. In a short time, Mission BBQ has developed a reputation for donating countless sandwiches and raising thousands of dollars to help police, firefighters and members of the military. "This is our chance to serve," said Bill Kraus, who owns the restaurant with a friend, Steve "Newt" Newton. Before the men officially opened the doors, fundraising for organizations was already under way. The restaurant's soft opening last September benefited the emergency assistance funds of police and firefighters unions in Anne Arundel County, pouring about $6,000 into the coffers of each.
NEWS
February 26, 2014
The plan unveiled this week by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel to substantially cut the size of U.S. military forces reflects a hard-eyed acknowledgment of today's strategic, political and budgetary realities. With the nation winding down the last of the two large land wars it has fought over the past decade, in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the end of the Cold War now more than 20 years behind us, the massive military establishment the U.S. has maintained for more than 70 years to deter potential adversaries is no longer optimally sized for long-term sustainability or for dealing with contemporary threats.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2001
Military personnel who've been ordered to report for active duty are being urged by the Mortgage Bankers Association of America to contact their lenders to discuss their eligibility for mortgage relief. Under The Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act of 1940, members of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard, military reservists and Guardsmen can qualify for financial relief. Benefits include the prohibition of lenders from foreclosing against military personnel during, and three months after, their tour of active duty.
BUSINESS
By Graeme Browning | March 12, 1991
As U.S. troops return from the Persian Gulf, businesses across the country are tying on a yellow bow in the form of discounts on airfares, new cars, entertainment and travel packages.The discounts -- which range from free tickets to Walt Disney World to stickers priced barely above dealer's cost on new Ford cars and trucks -- are available in many cases to all active-duty military personnel and their families, even if they did not serve in the gulf."What we're trying to do, in our own way, is to say 'thank you' to the troops," said Francis Conner, spokeswoman for Atlanta-based Delta Airlines, which is offering 70 percent off coach fares through Sept.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 14, 2007
WASHINGTON -- An internal Pentagon review this year found systemic problems and poor coordination in the military's efforts to obtain records from American banks and consumer credit agencies in terrorism and espionage investigations, according to Pentagon documents and interviews. In response to the review, Defense Department officials have ordered changes intended to strengthen legal safeguards and impose new training standards for use of the letters, which are used to examine the financial assets of U.S. military personnel and civilians involved in military investigations.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | December 19, 1990
SOMETIMES THOUGHTS about her son wake Mary Jane Wright in the middle of the night."I wake up and my mind is racing: 'What can I send him? Should I get up and write him a letter?' When I talk to him by phone, what if it's the last time I hear his voice?" said the mother of U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Donald Kahrs, who is scheduled to be sent to Saudi Arabia soon.Sometimes Rosalie Rogers tries too hard to read between the lines of letters from her son, Army Capt. Charles Rogers Jr., who is stationed in the Mideast.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2011
An Edgewood woman reported on the Aberdeen Proving Ground Facebook page Tuesday hearing three loud blasts, and another woman who lives in Delaware said she felt three loud explosions. They were among several people who complained about blasts from planned detonations at the Harford County military testing base that rocked the area about 6 p.m. Proving ground spokesman George Mercer said he was still trying to calm fears and explain the tests two hours afterward, though the explosions were held in "a remote part of APG. " He said the military installation can cause noise a variety of ways, including firing guns testing armor and detonating charges, but officials usually try to notify residents ahead of time.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2005
Three baggage handlers at Baltimore-Washington International Airport have been charged with stealing electronics and other valuables from U.S. military personnel on overseas assignments and from other international travelers. Thousands of dollars worth of laptop computers, cameras and other items were taken, mostly from the luggage of military personnel, in what Maryland Transportation Authority police called a "major felony theft scheme" that targeted international travelers. Charging documents filed against one of the men refer to complaints made by at least 31 military personnel flying in and out of the airport.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
On Thursday afternoon, a five-person crew at Anne Arundel Community College raised a flagpole to mark a spot on the Arnold campus that school officials say will commemorate military veterans. Unlike the iconic 1945 photograph showing five Marines and one Navy corpsman raising the U.S. flag on Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima, the Anne Arundel contingent was aided by a boom lift in hoisting the 30-foot flagpole. It is a key piece of the school's Veterans Memorial Garden, a site that will be formally dedicated Monday — Veterans Day — in a ceremony that's part of the school's Veterans Appreciation Week.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 4, 2013
Whole Foods Market, the latest retailer to offer government shutdown specials, has invited shoppers in on Sunday for a free spaghetti dinner. "With no end in sight to the government shutdown, wanted to pass along what Whole Foods Market is planning to do to help in the community," Katie Malloy, a spokeswoman for the grocer, said in an email. "Because federal workers are not just customers -- they're neighbors, partners, family and friends. " Malloy says Whole Foods is offering more free samples, Wi-Fi and seating to encourage consumers, furloughed or not, to gather at the stores.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 3, 2013
Sam's Club is waiving membership requirements for military personnel and retirees and their families during the government shutdown. The retailer said Thursday it decided to waive the fees after dozens of commissaries on military bases were closed by the shutdown. "Military personnel, retirees and their families heavily depend on commissaries for low-cost groceries and everyday needs," Sam's Club's announcement said.  The retailer said it planned to waive the fees at Sam's Club locations near military bases until the government re-opens the commissaries.
NEWS
By Eugene R. Fidell | September 16, 2013
The latest high-profile military justice case to come out of the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis merits nationwide attention. In a nutshell, it involves allegations of sexual assault of a female midshipman by several members of the Academy football team. Liquor seems to have played a pivotal role. The case raises a host of issues, such as the facilitation of drinking by athletes at what amounts to an off-campus fraternity house. It is also disturbing that Naval Academy athletes seem over recent memory to have a real penchant for getting into trouble.
NEWS
By David S. Cloud and Carrie Wells, Tribune Newspapers | May 7, 2013
The Pentagon estimated Tuesday that 26,000 members of the military were sexually assaulted last year, 36 percent more than a year earlier, in a trend so severe that senior officials warned it could threaten recruiting and retention of military personnel. President Barack Obama, reacting to the startling figures, said he has "no tolerance" for sexual assaults in the ranks and pledged to crack down on commanders who ignore the problem. Obama said he had spoken to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and ordered that officers "up and down the food chain" get the message.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
Active-duty military personnel using BWI Marshall Airport are eligible to participate in Pre-Check, an expedited security screening, the Transportation Security Administration announced Wednesday. TSA officers staffing the Pre-Check station at Concourse D will scan a service member's Common Access Card to determine if they qualify; service members do not have to be in uniform to be considered. Eligible passengers may be directed to a lane that will allow them to leave their shoes, light outerwear and belt on, keep their laptop in its case and their liquids and gels bag in a carry-on.
NEWS
August 3, 2003
Parents' letters can stop release of kids' information The federal No Child Left Behind Act stipulates that high schools may, upon request by military personnel, release student names, addresses and telephone numbers for recruiting purposes. Carroll County public schools will not release a student's information if a parent or guardian provides a letter stating that permission for such release is not granted. Parents or guardians who do not want their child's information to be released to military personnel must submit a written statement to the school principal on or before Sept.
NEWS
December 19, 2007
Celtic Holiday concert -- The South County Concert Association will present Maggie Sansone along with the dancers from the Culkin School of Irish Dance at 7:30 p.m. today in the auditorium of Southern High School, 4400 Old Solomons Island Road, Harwood. Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for children and free to SCCA members, AACCA members and active military personnel - home for the holiday - with identification. 410-867-1584.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Dr. Gerald D. Klee, a retired psychiatrist who was an LSD expert and participated in its experimentation on volunteer servicemen at several military installations in the 1950s, died Sunday of complications after surgery at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Timonium resident was 86. Dr. Klee made headlines in 1975 when he confirmed published reports that the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Psychiatric Institute had been involved in secret research between 1956 and 1959, when hundreds of Army soldiers were given LSD, or lysergic acid diethylamide.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
To work for Fireworks Extravaganza, a job applicant needs a clean record and the ability to pass a Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives background check. That's one reason Wells Berni, a local representative of the New Jersey-based company and "lead shooter" for fireworks displays, likes to hear from people with military backgrounds when recruiting potential employees. "I've got to be very careful," Berni said. "The military, they do a lot of drug screenings and they have a lot of security checks.
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