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By MARK MAZZETTI AND JOEL HAVEMANN and MARK MAZZETTI AND JOEL HAVEMANN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The White House said yesterday that it plans to ask Congress for an additional $70 billion to pay for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, driving the cost of military operations in the two countries to $120 billion this year, the highest since the Sept. 11 attacks. The bulk of the new money would go to pay for the war in Iraq, which already has cost an estimated $250 billion since the U.S. invasion in March 2003. The additional spending, along with other war funds the Bush administration will seek separately in its regular budget next week, would push the price tag for combat and nation building since Sept.
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EXPLORE
February 12, 2013
Army 1st Lt. Edmund Carazo has returned to the United States after his deployment overseas at a forward operating base, serving in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, the official name given to anti-terrorism military operations involving U.S. troops and allied coalition partners. With eight years of military service, Carazo is an infantry officer assigned to the 4th Airborne Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. The son of Nancy Carazo, of Laurel, he is a 1999 graduate of Meade High School and received his bachelor's in 2004 from Towson University and master's in 2008 from Troy University, in Alabama..
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NEWS
January 10, 2005
As of yesterday, 1,352 U.S. service members have died since the beginning of military operations. Since May 1, 2003, when President Bush declared that major combat operations in Iraq had ended, 1,214 U.S. soldiers have died. Latest identification Army Pfc. Daniel F. Guastaferro, 27, Las Vegas; died Friday in Ramadi, Iraq, when his vehicle crashed; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, Camp Casey, South Korea.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Ned Parker,Los Angeles Times | July 8, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A suicide bomber drove a load of watermelons and vegetables to the center of a village marketplace in northern Iraq yesterday and then detonated his big, yellow truck, killing as many as 150 people in what appeared to be the deadliest attack yet in a year of unremitting violence. Officials said they feared that the region where the blast occurred, a crucible of tension among ethnic groups, had been singled out by insurgents chased from other hot spots around the country by U.S.-led military operations.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 4, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Determined to keep up pressure on the White House and congressional Republicans to support a troop withdrawal from Iraq, House Democratic leaders began to coalesce yesterday around a plan that would link continued war funding to progress by the Iraqi government. Under the proposal, which was still being worked out, the bill would guarantee money for military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan only through July, according to Democratic sources. Under the plan, lawmakers would vote on another war funding bill after Congress received a report from the Bush administration in July on how much progress the Iraqi government had made on a series of benchmarks, including disarming militias and passing laws to share oil wealth.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 31, 2003
WASHINGTON -- In the worst loss of life for the U.S. military in Afghanistan in almost a year, four Americans were killed yesterday when their Army helicopter crashed near the Bagram air base, defense officials said. There were no indications that the crash of the UH-60 Black Hawk was caused by hostile fire, said Lt. Col. Martin Compton, a spokesman for U.S. Central Command, which is in charge of military operations in the region. Officials said that the cause of the crash was not clear, but that it appeared to be an accident.
EXPLORE
February 12, 2013
Army 1st Lt. Edmund Carazo has returned to the United States after his deployment overseas at a forward operating base, serving in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, the official name given to anti-terrorism military operations involving U.S. troops and allied coalition partners. With eight years of military service, Carazo is an infantry officer assigned to the 4th Airborne Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. The son of Nancy Carazo, of Laurel, he is a 1999 graduate of Meade High School and received his bachelor's in 2004 from Towson University and master's in 2008 from Troy University, in Alabama..
NEWS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - Gen. Tommy Franks, who led U.S. forces in Afghanistan and Iraq, retired yesterday, saying that the fight against terrorism has transformed U.S. military operations. At a change of command ceremony at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Fla., Franks, 57, noted that at the time of the Sept. 11 attacks, Afghanistan was in the grips of the Taliban regime and Iraq was ruled by Saddam Hussein. "What a difference 22 months make," the 36-year Army veteran said. As head of U.S. Central Command, Franks oversaw military operations in an area stretching from the Horn of Africa to Central Asia.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun Tom Bowman of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | January 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives gave a final blessing to Operation Desert Storm yesterday, overwhelmingly approving a resolution expressing solidarity with President Bush and the U.S. forces deployed in the Persian Gulf.On a 399-6 vote, the House approved the same resolution that the Senate unanimously adopted Thursday.The act represented the last presently contemplated war-related action by the full Congress, whose members have been sitting uneasily on the sidelines and watching events unfold, largely beyond their control.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff who guided U.S. military operations in Haiti and Bosnia, plans to retire from the military in September, a White House spokesman announced yesterday.By stepping down, the 60-year-old general is following other Joint Chiefs chairmen who left office after serving two two-year terms.White House spokesman Mike McCurry said President Clinton had not decided who will replace Shalikashvili or Gen. George Joulwan, NATO's supreme allied commander, who will retire in the spring.
NEWS
By M. Karim Faiez and Laura King and M. Karim Faiez and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 19, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- The U.S. military expressed regret yesterday over the deaths of seven Afghan children in an airstrike a day earlier but blamed Islamic insurgents for preventing the youngsters from leaving the compound that was hit. American officials said U.S.-led coalition forces were unaware of the presence of noncombatants inside the compound in Paktika province, which also contained a mosque and a madrassa, or Islamic seminary. Seven boys under the age of 16, including at least one as young as 10, were killed in Sunday's airstrike, according to Afghan officials.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 4, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Determined to keep up pressure on the White House and congressional Republicans to support a troop withdrawal from Iraq, House Democratic leaders began to coalesce yesterday around a plan that would link continued war funding to progress by the Iraqi government. Under the proposal, which was still being worked out, the bill would guarantee money for military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan only through July, according to Democratic sources. Under the plan, lawmakers would vote on another war funding bill after Congress received a report from the Bush administration in July on how much progress the Iraqi government had made on a series of benchmarks, including disarming militias and passing laws to share oil wealth.
NEWS
By David Cortright and Robert G. Gard Jr | February 5, 2007
Rather than continuing to pursue an elusive military solution in Iraq, the United States should adopt a violence-reduction strategy that encourages cooperation among the country's embattled factions. What Iraq needs is not more U.S. troops, but a new approach that attempts to break the deadly spiral of violence. The U.S. could lead the way by halting offensive operations and initiating a general cease-fire. Given the dismal record of what has been accomplished in nearly four years of combat, it is doubtful that suspending military operations for a few months would make the situation worse or cause irreparable harm.
NEWS
By MOHAMAD BAZZI and MOHAMAD BAZZI,NEWSDAY | August 12, 2006
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- The United Nations Security Council unanimously approved a resolution yesterday aimed at resolving the conflict between Hezbollah and Israel. The measure calls for deploying 15,000 United Nations peacekeepers in south Lebanon to help the Lebanese army take control of the area once Israeli troops withdraw. It is a victory for Lebanon, which rejected a draft resolution unveiled Aug. 5 by the United States and France, saying that it was doomed to fail because it did not require an Israeli pullout.
NEWS
By MARK MAZZETTI AND JOEL HAVEMANN and MARK MAZZETTI AND JOEL HAVEMANN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 3, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The White House said yesterday that it plans to ask Congress for an additional $70 billion to pay for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, driving the cost of military operations in the two countries to $120 billion this year, the highest since the Sept. 11 attacks. The bulk of the new money would go to pay for the war in Iraq, which already has cost an estimated $250 billion since the U.S. invasion in March 2003. The additional spending, along with other war funds the Bush administration will seek separately in its regular budget next week, would push the price tag for combat and nation building since Sept.
NEWS
By Nicole Gaouette and Nicole Gaouette,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said yesterday that, if the military were deployed inside the United States in response to a terrorist attack, his department - not the Pentagon - would exercise overall control. "The Department of Homeland Security has the responsibility under the president's directives to coordinate the entirety of the response to a terrorist act here in the United States," Chertoff said on CNN, responding to news reports that the Pentagon has drawn up plans for military action.
NEWS
By Esther Schrader and Esther Schrader,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration wants to boost military spending by 7 percent to nearly $402 billion in fiscal 2005, the Pentagon said yesterday. That would take the defense budget to levels exceeding those at the height of the Cold War. The increase is needed to help pay for a raft of costly weapons and programs bolstered by the Washington's response to the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. But the proposed budget does not include the costs of continuing military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, which for two years have largely been funded through large supplemental spending bills.
NEWS
By M. Karim Faiez and Laura King and M. Karim Faiez and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 19, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- The U.S. military expressed regret yesterday over the deaths of seven Afghan children in an airstrike a day earlier but blamed Islamic insurgents for preventing the youngsters from leaving the compound that was hit. American officials said U.S.-led coalition forces were unaware of the presence of noncombatants inside the compound in Paktika province, which also contained a mosque and a madrassa, or Islamic seminary. Seven boys under the age of 16, including at least one as young as 10, were killed in Sunday's airstrike, according to Afghan officials.
NEWS
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 19, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - U.S. Marines and Iraqi soldiers killed at least 50 purported militants in the town of Karabilah in two days of intense fighting in the volatile western region of Iraq, the U.S. military reported yesterday. American and Iraqi troops have come under heavy small-arms fire in the skirmishes in and around the desolate town but had not reported any casualties from the fighting as of late yesterday, U.S. military officials said. While conducting searches in central Karabilah yesterday, Marines and Iraqi soldiers came upon four Iraqi hostages handcuffed and chained to a wall in a bunker, Marine officials said.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2005
WASHINGTON - Congressional negotiators reached agreement yesterday on an $82 billion emergency spending measure to pay for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, with features that supporters say will improve U.S. national security. One of those is aimed at preventing states from issuing driver's licenses to illegal immigrants. Under the provision, applicants must prove they are legal residents of the United States to gain a license that could be used for a variety of identification purposes, including boarding an airplane.
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