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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - Contending that the armed forces have been stretched thin by the campaign against terrorism, senior military officials are urging Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld to expand the forces by 50,000 or more men and women. Though George W. Bush criticized the Clinton administration in the 2000 presidential campaign for overextending the military, Rumsfeld is resisting calls to expand the forces, arguing that the cost is too high. The chiefs of the four services assert that the high pace of war operations in Central Asia, combined with heightened security at all military installations across the world and the expansion of military activities into such countries as the Philippines and Yemen, have put immense stress on the nation's 1.4 million soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
COLLEGE PARK - After declines in attendance at Washington's RFK Stadium over the past two years, Military Bowl officials say they hope to sell out this year's game between Maryland and Marshall at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis on Dec. 27. The first-ever bowl game at a service academy represents a fresh start for the bowl, which drew an announced 17,835 for last year's San Jose State-Bowling Green matchup at the 46,000-seat RFK...
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NEWS
By MARK MAZZETTI AND BORZOU DARAGAHI and MARK MAZZETTI AND BORZOU DARAGAHI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 30, 2005
WASHINGTON -- As part of an extensive information offensive inside Iraq, the U.S. military is secretly paying Iraqi newspaper editors to publish stories written by U.S. troops in an effort to burnish the image of the U.S. mission within Iraq. Working with a private defense contractor, military officials in Iraq are having articles written by U.S. military "information operations" troops translated into Arabic and then placed in newspapers around Baghdad, according to U.S. military officials and documents obtained by the Los Angeles Times.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
The U.S. Department of Defense was called Saturday afternoon to deal with a piece of unexploded ordnance found near a home in Anne Arundel County, fire officials said. Military officials from Fort Belvoir were to investigate what appears to be decades-old ammunition, said Battalion Chief Steve Thompson, of the Anne Arundel County Fire Department. The piece of ordnance was found off Grays Road in Harwood, he said, and is about two feet long and 10 inches in diameter. The shell appears to have been near the home for a long time, he said.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon ordered revisions yesterday in its "don't ask, don't tell" policy aimed at curbing complaints that military officials have failed to prevent harassment of homosexuals and have engaged in aggressive legal investigations of suspected gay and lesbian troops."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- U.S. military officials knew a hostile missile radar was tracking Capt. Scott F. O'Grady's F-16 fighter jet several minutes before he was shot down over Bosnia-Herzegovina last month, but could not alert him, military officials said yesterday.A Pentagon report on the causes of the downing concludes that the NATO AWACS plane that would have relayed the warning to the pilot lacked sophisticated equipment used to transmit and receive highly classified electronic messages from U.S. intelligence officials.
NEWS
By John Hendren and John Hendren,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Attacks against the American occupying force in Iraq escalated yesterday as two soldiers were killed and four were wounded in two separate ambushes on military convoys in one of the most violent days since the end of the war. Attackers fired rocket-propelled grenades, heavy machine guns and small arms at an eight-vehicle supply convoy in what military officials described as an ambush at 6:15 a.m. near Hadithah, 120 miles northwest of...
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | October 7, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Irate Republican legislators denounced Defense Secretary Les Aspin yesterday for failing to send M1-A1 tanks and other reinforcements requested last month by the U.S. military commander in Somalia.The tanks would have helped protect American forces in a firefight Sunday that killed 12 soldiers, wounded 78 and left as many as eight others missing or captured, the lawmakers charged.Rep. James T. Walsh of New York took the House floor to declare that Mr. Aspin "should tender his resignation" if news reports of his decision are true.
NEWS
By New York Times | February 14, 1991
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- Iraq has a major military communications center hidden in a secret basement of one of the main hotels used by journalists in Baghdad, senior American military officials say.The center sends out the last secure transmission lines to Iraqi forces in Kuwait over two bridges that span the Tigris River, the officials say.Allied commanders, after ordering the successful attack on four bridges in Baghdad, have been ordered by Washington not...
BUSINESS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | February 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- U.S. military transportation officials say the Port of Baltimore is being considered as an entry point for materiel that will return from the war in the Persian Gulf.The port did not handle any outgoing military supplies and equipment because much of the materiel belonged to military units stationed in the South and was shipped from Southern ports, according to military officials and the office of Rep. Helen D. Bentley, R-2nd.Bentley and her staff helped arrange a port visit two weeks ago by Maj. Gen. John R. Piatak of the Military Traffic Management Command based in Falls Church, Va. The command is responsible for moving Department of Defense materiel.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes,Los Angeles Times | March 5, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Two top U.S. military commanders said yesterday that Iran continues to train and direct violent Shiite militias in Iraq and is trying to permanently weaken the Iraqi government. Iran has become the biggest long-term threat to Iraqi stability and is encouraging radical Shiite elements to continue attacks while some prominent militia leaders push for cease-fires, said Army Lt. Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, who just completed a 15-month assignment as day-to-day commander in Iraq.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 25, 2008
WASHINGTON -- With its international mandate in Iraq set to expire in 11 months, the Bush administration will insist that the government in Baghdad give the United States broad authority to conduct combat operations and guarantee civilian contractors specific legal protections from Iraqi law, according to administration and military officials. This emerging U.S. negotiating position faces a potential buzz saw of opposition from Iraq, with its fragmented parliament, weak central government and deep sensitivities about being seen as a dependent state, according to these officials.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | October 19, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Despite hopes that the U.S. military "surge" in Iraq would encourage economic and political headway and sap the strength of the insurgency, very little lasting progress has been achieved, according to a new U.S. report. The study, based on the assessments of dozens of U.S. military and civilian officials working at local levels across Iraq, runs counter to the optimistic forecasts by the top U.S. commander in Iraq, Gen. David Petraeus, and Ambassador Ryan Crocker. It said that with the exception of Anbar province, there has been "little progress" toward political reconciliation, a key U.S. goal in Iraq.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 14, 2007
WASHINGTON -- An internal Pentagon review this year found systemic problems and poor coordination in the military's efforts to obtain records from American banks and consumer credit agencies in terrorism and espionage investigations, according to Pentagon documents and interviews. In response to the review, Defense Department officials have ordered changes intended to strengthen legal safeguards and impose new training standards for use of the letters, which are used to examine the financial assets of U.S. military personnel and civilians involved in military investigations.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,Los Angeles Times | October 14, 2007
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba -- A complex of canvas Quonset huts arrayed like dominoes has risen on an abandoned airfield here, where just a year ago the Pentagon envisioned a $125 million permanent judicial center in which terrorism suspects would be brought to trial. The battlefield-style Expeditionary Legal Complex, which can be quickly dismantled once the war-crimes tribunals of the Guantanamo detainees are over, reflects the shrinking mission of the controversial procedures created by the Military Commissions Act of 2006.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 21, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Six American soldiers and their interpreter were killed by a roadside bomb in western Baghdad on Saturday, the military said yesterday, in one of the deadliest single attacks against American troops in the capital in recent months. The soldiers, whose names were not released, had been searching for insurgent arms caches, the military said in a statement. A soldier assigned to the Army's 13th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), a supply unit, was killed Saturday when a bomb struck his armored vehicle near Diwaniya, south of Baghdad, the military said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 17, 2002
WASHINGTON - Pashtun tribal leaders in eastern Afghanistan have largely refused to cooperate with U.S. special operations forces in their hunt for al-Qaida and Taliban fighters, weapons caches and intelligence that could prevent future terrorist attacks, military officials said yesterday. The rebuff, which comes as the Pentagon disclosed the discovery near Kabul of two canisters that could contain deadly chemicals, has left U.S. forces with few Afghan allies in one of the most dangerous regions of the country.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The day-to-day commander of U.S. forces in Iraq has recommended that the heightened American troop levels there be maintained through February, military officials said yesterday. The White House has never said exactly how long it intends the troop buildup to last, but military officials say the increased American force level will begin declining in August unless additional units are sent or more units are held over. The confidential recommendation by the commander, Lt. Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, reflects the military's new counterinsurgency doctrine, which puts a premium on sustained efforts to win over a wary population.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The day-to-day commander of U.S. forces in Iraq has recommended that the heightened American troop levels there be maintained through February, military officials said yesterday. The White House has never said exactly how long it intends the troop buildup to last, but military officials say the increased American force level will begin declining in August unless additional units are sent or more units are held over. The confidential recommendation by the commander, Lt. Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, reflects the military's new counterinsurgency doctrine, which puts a premium on sustained efforts to win over a wary population.
NEWS
By Solomon Moore and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 7, 2006
BAGHDAD -- Ten U.S. servicemen were killed in Iraq in four separate incidents yesterday, while bombs, mortar attacks and bullets killed at least 71 Iraqis. U.S. military fatalities had reached 2,918, as of last night, according to the icasualties.org, a Web site that tracks military deaths in Iraq. That total includes the announcement yesterday that a U.S. soldier stationed in Baghdad was killed during combat Sunday. About 50,000 Iraqi civilians have died in the same period, according to Iraq Body Count, an independent group that bases its tally on media reports.
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