Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMilitary Officers
IN THE NEWS

Military Officers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 1999
SANTIAGO, Chile -- The arrest of Gen. Augusto Pinochet in London a year ago has opened a quiet and long-postponed reckoning in Chile over its years of dictatorship that is finally bringing former military officers to task for the deaths or disappearances of thousands of political opponents. Since the arrest of Pinochet, the former dictator, 25 officers have been arrested on charges of murder, torture and kidnapping, including a member of one of the juntas that helped rule the country for 17 years after 1973.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 19, 2011
The death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves a cloud of uncertainty over North Asia and complicates efforts by the U.S. and its allies to halt the nuclear weapons program that is the principal legacy of his 17-year rule. Kim was a canny and manipulative despot who repeatedly thwarted efforts by more powerful neighbors and adversaries like the United States to stabilize the Korean peninsula. Now that he is gone, the internal power struggle over succession could have unpredictable and perhaps dangerous consequences for the region and the world.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 22, 2005
SO, GIRLFRIEND. Did he give you something sexy for Valentine's Day? Did it fit? Would you be caught dead in it? Did you feel like you should talk price before you put it on? If that gift of lingerie created issues instead of opportunities, your significant other clearly didn't have the chance to read "The Gentleman's Guide to Buying Lingerie," which appeared this month in Today's Officer, a publication of the Military Officers Association of America. Count on the military to find new avenues for training.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
John M. Vernarelli, who served in Korea and Vietnam as a military police officer and later had a second career as a chef, died Aug. 14 of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Perry Hall resident was 80. Mr. Vernarelli, one of 14 children of Italian immigrants, was born at home on East Chase Street. When he was 16, he tried to enlist in the Army, until military authorities learned his age and he was sent home from Fort Meade to Baltimore. "The next year, on March 27, 1947 — one day after his 17th birthday — he enlisted," said a nephew, Mark Vernarelli, who is a spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correction Services.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
The death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves a cloud of uncertainty over North Asia and complicates efforts by the U.S. and its allies to halt the nuclear weapons program that is the principal legacy of his 17-year rule. Kim was a canny and manipulative despot who repeatedly thwarted efforts by more powerful neighbors and adversaries like the United States to stabilize the Korean peninsula. Now that he is gone, the internal power struggle over succession could have unpredictable and perhaps dangerous consequences for the region and the world.
NEWS
By DAVID EVANS | February 18, 1992
Washington. -- "This could be the beginning of the end for the service academies,'' said a West Point alumnus. He was referring to a new law that takes effect with the class of plebes entering the academy in 1997. The midshipmen and cadets at the Naval and Air Force Academies are affected too; upon graduation, they'll no longer receive regular commissions and the implied commitment to a military career. Instead, they'll get reserve commissions and their implication of temporary service.Indeed, under the new law, all new officers, from the academies and from other sources, such as the Reserve Officer Training Corps, will start off as reserve officers.
NEWS
November 6, 2002
Lt. Col. Albert E. Bauman Jr., a World War II combat veteran and career military officer, died in his sleep Monday at his Catonsville home. He was 92. Colonel Bauman was born and raised in Trenton, N.J. He moved to Baltimore in 1932, and worked as a keypunch operator for the newly created Social Security Administration. In the late 1930s, he enlisted in the 110th Field Artillery Battalion of the 29th Division. After graduating from Officers Candidate School in the early days of World War II, he was assigned to the division's 108th Field Artillery.
NEWS
September 13, 2006
Urias S. Horst, a retired military officer and former Owings Mills resident, died of heart failure Sept. 5 - his 91st birthday - at a nursing home in Duncannon, Pa. Mr. Horst was born in Reading, Pa., and was raised in Annville, Pa. He joined the Army in 1935 and served for two years before becoming a trooper with the Pennsylvania State Police. In 1942, he re-enlisted in the Army and served in covert operations in the Pacific and later in Korea during the Korean War. He retired as a major in 1962.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | February 17, 1991
When Air Force Maj. Steve Lynch was based in Germany from 1985 to 1988, he continued to pay income taxes in his home state of Maryland.But he saw that other Marylanders who worked overseas for private employers or even for the University of Maryland did not; up to $70,000 of their earnings was exempted from the state's income tax."This is grossly unfair. It's discriminatory for the state of Maryland to tax military and federal employees overseas while giving tax breaks to others" who don't work for Uncle Sam, said Major Lynch, who is now based at Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 13, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- A trial of the 10 military officers indicted last month on charges of kidnapping and torturing six students during the 1980s remains at least a month away, pending a review of the government's evidence by two criminal court judges and their decision as to whether to allow the prosecution to proceed.The judges are interviewing the government's witnesses and visiting the buildings that were used as clandestine jails by Battalion 316, the secret intelligence unit trained by the CIA and which has been held responsible for many of the human rights abuses committed by the military.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan, Gadi Dechter and Gus G. Sentementes and Matthew Dolan, Gadi Dechter and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN REPORTERS | April 5, 2007
By his neighbors' account, Juan Manuel Rivera-Rondon lived a quiet life in an insular, upscale Montgomery County community where few truly know each other's past. A legal immigrant from Peru, he had married, had two girls and later divorced while living in the United States, court papers show. He had prospered in the home mortgage business, acquiring two expensive houses outside Washington, taking trips with his girlfriend to the Cayman Islands and traveling back to Peru to visit his sick mother.
NEWS
September 13, 2006
Urias S. Horst, a retired military officer and former Owings Mills resident, died of heart failure Sept. 5 - his 91st birthday - at a nursing home in Duncannon, Pa. Mr. Horst was born in Reading, Pa., and was raised in Annville, Pa. He joined the Army in 1935 and served for two years before becoming a trooper with the Pennsylvania State Police. In 1942, he re-enlisted in the Army and served in covert operations in the Pacific and later in Korea during the Korean War. He retired as a major in 1962.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 22, 2005
SO, GIRLFRIEND. Did he give you something sexy for Valentine's Day? Did it fit? Would you be caught dead in it? Did you feel like you should talk price before you put it on? If that gift of lingerie created issues instead of opportunities, your significant other clearly didn't have the chance to read "The Gentleman's Guide to Buying Lingerie," which appeared this month in Today's Officer, a publication of the Military Officers Association of America. Count on the military to find new avenues for training.
NEWS
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2004
An Anne Arundel County police officer charged with theft after being accused of collecting a paycheck from the department while falsely claiming to be serving in Iraq had not been called up for reserves duty during the past four years, military officials said last week. Steve Stromvall, a spokesman for the U.S. Army Reserve, confirmed that Officer Andrew Barnett, 48, of Hanover is a member of the Individual Ready Reserve. But, he said, military records show that Barnett is not among the more than 5,600 such reservists who have been or are being called up to play support roles in Afghanistan and Iraq.
NEWS
November 6, 2002
Lt. Col. Albert E. Bauman Jr., a World War II combat veteran and career military officer, died in his sleep Monday at his Catonsville home. He was 92. Colonel Bauman was born and raised in Trenton, N.J. He moved to Baltimore in 1932, and worked as a keypunch operator for the newly created Social Security Administration. In the late 1930s, he enlisted in the 110th Field Artillery Battalion of the 29th Division. After graduating from Officers Candidate School in the early days of World War II, he was assigned to the division's 108th Field Artillery.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 23, 2002
WASHINGTON - Senior military officers are deeply concerned about the cost, demands and hazards of occupying Iraq, including the teeming capital city of Baghdad, should U.S. forces overthrow Saddam Hussein. Some estimate that it would take thousands, if not tens of thousands, of troops to patrol Iraq, especially Baghdad, where the prospect of revenge killings, ethnic rivalry, terrorism and a humanitarian crisis could dwarf the urban perils faced by U.S. troops in Somalia in 1993. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, appearing before Congress last week, declined to publicly discuss the number of peacekeeping troops that might be needed, but a study conducted for the Army based on 16 U.S. military occupations in the 20th century - dating to the Philippines in 1902 - estimates that about 100,000 occupation troops would be required to patrol a post-Hussein Iraq.
NEWS
By GINGER THOMPSON and GINGER THOMPSON,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 18, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- A judge investigating human rights abuses by the Honduran military ordered the arrest yesterday of three military officers accused of kidnapping and torturing university students during the 1980s.It is the first time that arrest warrants have been issued against high-level officers who are suspected of being former members of a CIA-trained unit called Battalion 316. The unit stalked, kidnapped, tortured and murdered hundreds of suspected leftists during the 1980s at a time when the Reagan administration was running a campaign to wipe out communism in Central America.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and John-Thor Dahlburg,Los Angeles Times | December 12, 1991
MOSCOW -- Decisively defeating Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the battle for the hearts and minds of the Soviet armed forces, Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin yesterday won top commanders over to his vision of a post-Soviet commonwealth, sources said.At the same time Mr. Yeltsin said yesterday that two more republics, Armenia and Kirgizia, had decided to join the Commonwealth of Independent States, increasing the chance that the alliance formed over the weekend by Slavic leaders will attract most of the Soviet republics.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
But for her sweater and a morning meeting that took her from her Pentagon office to another room in the sprawling building Sept. 11, Lt. Col. Marilyn Wills wouldn't be here today. The meeting started minutes before her desk was engulfed in flames. The sweater, soaked from the sprinklers, provided water as Wills and her co-workers sucked on its fibers as they groped for an exit through the smoke. Wills led the procession to a window on the second floor, where they jumped to safety. Wills, the Army personnel chief's liaison to Congress, won the Soldier's Medal for her valor that day. But the mother of two from Prince George's County insists the real heroes are those fighting in Afghanistan.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.