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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the first detailed public discussion of the Bush administration's plans for a postwar Iraq, senior officials told Congress yesterday that it would take more than two years for the U.S. military to transfer control of Iraq's government to Iraqi leaders. The officials, seeking to demonstrate to skeptical senators that the administration's planning was well advanced, outlined a long list of steps for administering and democratizing Iraq after the ouster of Saddam Hussein. Those would include finding and destroying Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, eliminating terrorist cells, starting economic reconstruction projects, purging Baathist leaders from the bureaucracy, protecting oil fields and securing the country's borders - particularly with Iran.
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NEWS
By Ron Smith | December 2, 2010
In this week of WikiLeaks, "Slurpee Summits" and lame ducks quacking in the halls of Congress, an underlying and most disturbing reality remains intact and in charge, leading some of us to question whether the recently conducted midterm elections really matter much at all. One must understand that any number of newly minted elected officials, presidents, senators and congressional representatives have promised to change Washington upon taking office....
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NEWS
By IRA L. STRAUS | July 14, 1991
New York -- KGB chief Vladimir Kryuchkov, in a closed-door speech to the U.S.S.R. Supreme Soviet June 18, accused Western intelligence services planning for ''pacification and even occupation'' of the Soviet Union, on the ''pretext'' of keeping Soviet nuclear forces under control. The West was imposing demands of drastic economic changes; perestroika was being done as a favor to the West, in the ''illusion'' that the West would give tens of billions of dollars to make it work. A ''catastrophe'' was brewing, like the Nazi invasion.
NEWS
By Fawaz A. Gerges | June 4, 2003
POOR MAHMOUD Abbas, the new Palestinian prime minister. Now that he had his historic meeting with his Israeli counterpart, Ariel Sharon, and President Bush, he is being squeezed by all sides to produce concrete results. Palestinians expect him to free them from Israeli military occupation and improve their well-being (75 percent of Palestinians live below the poverty line on less than $2 a day, and unemployment reaches as high as 60 percent, according to U.N. sources). Americans and Israelis are using Abu Mazen, as Mr. Abbas is known generally, to sideline Palestinian President Yasser Arafat and are pressuring him to crack down against militant groups, particularly Hamas and Islamic Jihad, regardless of whether such a confrontation results in a Palestinian civil war. Mr. Abbas is called upon to deliver no less than a miracle - isolating and replacing an autocratic but charismatic leader; pacifying a deeply politicized, mobilized and militarized society; and negotiating a viable peace settlement with one of Israel's fiercest hawks, who leads the most hard-line government in Israeli history.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 27, 1992
CAM RANH, Vietnam -- To thousands of American soldiers, this palm-strewn paradise offered a deceptively placid first look at Vietnam.With its stunning beaches and turquoise waters set off by gumdrop-shaped hills, Cam Ranh Bay shimmered in the heat like an unexpected oasis, a paradise that cloaked subsequent anguish. Visiting the soldiers stationed here once, comedian Bob Hope called this giant military base "the world's largest sand trap."But now, after 25 years of military occupation -- by Americans until 1975, then by the troops of the Soviet Union -- this strategic target on the Cold War map of the world is being surrendered without a shot or a whimper.
NEWS
By Moustafa Bayoumi | April 5, 2002
NEW YORK -- There is a dangerous tendency in the United States to view the violence between Israelis and Palestinians as either the product of Palestinian fanaticism or as symmetrical fighting between two warring factions. Many people seem to believe that violence is the inevitable outcome for these two peoples. This ignores a fundamental truth. The suicide bombings must be stopped, but the root of the violence is not pathological terrorism or cynical politics, but a brutal military occupation that has been strangling the Palestinian people for decades.
NEWS
By Fawaz A. Gerges | January 28, 2003
PRESIDENT BUSH told Iraqi opposition leaders at the White House recently that he favored a sweeping transition to democracy in Iraq and a brief military occupation after the expected toppling of Saddam Hussein. While the Iraqi participants said they felt reassured by the president's commitment, they had emphasized the importance of creating an Iraqi political partner for the United States before Mr. Hussein's ouster. But the Bush administration does not appear to share the opposition's urgency to immediately empower Iraqis to govern themselves.
NEWS
By Fawaz A. Gerges | June 4, 2003
POOR MAHMOUD Abbas, the new Palestinian prime minister. Now that he had his historic meeting with his Israeli counterpart, Ariel Sharon, and President Bush, he is being squeezed by all sides to produce concrete results. Palestinians expect him to free them from Israeli military occupation and improve their well-being (75 percent of Palestinians live below the poverty line on less than $2 a day, and unemployment reaches as high as 60 percent, according to U.N. sources). Americans and Israelis are using Abu Mazen, as Mr. Abbas is known generally, to sideline Palestinian President Yasser Arafat and are pressuring him to crack down against militant groups, particularly Hamas and Islamic Jihad, regardless of whether such a confrontation results in a Palestinian civil war. Mr. Abbas is called upon to deliver no less than a miracle - isolating and replacing an autocratic but charismatic leader; pacifying a deeply politicized, mobilized and militarized society; and negotiating a viable peace settlement with one of Israel's fiercest hawks, who leads the most hard-line government in Israeli history.
NEWS
By Ben Terrall | May 20, 2002
OAKLAND, Calif. -- East Timor will celebrate its independence today after throwing off a 24-year Indonesian military occupation that killed 200,000 East Timorese. But while the world should rightly congratulate the East Timorese people on their incredible accomplishment, it is important to remember that for more than two decades the United States provided bipartisan support for the Indonesian military (TNI), not the East Timorese. For that, Washington should formally apologize to the world's newest nation, situated 400 miles north of Australia, as the first step in a broader process of accountability for its role in financing TNI terror.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | December 10, 1994
JERUSALEM -- The three winners of the Nobel Peace Prize left behind a dark cloud of pessimism as they flew to the festivities surrounding their award in Norway today.World figures will applaud the presentation of the prestigious gold medals in Oslo to Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.But their own people are in a glum and sullen mood. Polls this week show 46 percent of Israeli Jews do not think that their leaders should accept the prize along with Mr. Arafat.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - In the first detailed public discussion of the Bush administration's plans for a postwar Iraq, senior officials told Congress yesterday that it would take more than two years for the U.S. military to transfer control of Iraq's government to Iraqi leaders. The officials, seeking to demonstrate to skeptical senators that the administration's planning was well advanced, outlined a long list of steps for administering and democratizing Iraq after the ouster of Saddam Hussein. Those would include finding and destroying Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, eliminating terrorist cells, starting economic reconstruction projects, purging Baathist leaders from the bureaucracy, protecting oil fields and securing the country's borders - particularly with Iran.
NEWS
By Fawaz A. Gerges | January 28, 2003
PRESIDENT BUSH told Iraqi opposition leaders at the White House recently that he favored a sweeping transition to democracy in Iraq and a brief military occupation after the expected toppling of Saddam Hussein. While the Iraqi participants said they felt reassured by the president's commitment, they had emphasized the importance of creating an Iraqi political partner for the United States before Mr. Hussein's ouster. But the Bush administration does not appear to share the opposition's urgency to immediately empower Iraqis to govern themselves.
NEWS
January 28, 2003
Israel should end occupation if it wants peace Having recently returned from two weeks in Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, I completely agree with Hope Keller that Israel is fighting a war it will never win ("Israel holds the key to ending a war it will never win," Opinion * Commentary, Jan. 12). I traveled with a group called Faculty for Israeli-Palestinian Peace and visited all the major universities in Israel and the occupied territories. Our group was constantly impressed with the dehumanizing nature of the military occupation and its effect on all phases of Palestinian life, including education.
NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | October 8, 2002
THERE IS an art to getting the answers you want by phrasing questions in the right way. For example, ask about 2,000 citizens (sufficient for a scientific sampling) if the United States should invade Osama bin Ladin-friendly Iraq and its demonic tyrant, Saddam Hussein, and even pacifists would be hard-pressed to answer no. That the news media and the Bush administration have cited polls showing Americans support a military attack on Iraq is, in this light, hardly compelling. To ask about overtaking a country whose culture, history and language few of us understand is tantamount to a talk show soliciting callers' opinions about, say, firing the manager of the local team, replacing incumbents in City Hall or changing school mascots.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 6, 2002
JERUSALEM - Israel's departing military chief of staff said yesterday that only the ouster of Yasser Arafat or his replacement as Palestinian leader might prompt an Israeli withdrawal in coming months from the seven West Bank cities it has placed under 24-hour curfew. As long as Arafat and the risk of Palestinian violence remain, "we will have no choice but to stay in the Palestinian cities," the chief of staff, Lt. Gen. Shaul Mofaz, said in a valedictory interview published yesterday in the newspaper Yediot Ahronot.
NEWS
By Ben Terrall | May 20, 2002
OAKLAND, Calif. -- East Timor will celebrate its independence today after throwing off a 24-year Indonesian military occupation that killed 200,000 East Timorese. But while the world should rightly congratulate the East Timorese people on their incredible accomplishment, it is important to remember that for more than two decades the United States provided bipartisan support for the Indonesian military (TNI), not the East Timorese. For that, Washington should formally apologize to the world's newest nation, situated 400 miles north of Australia, as the first step in a broader process of accountability for its role in financing TNI terror.
NEWS
January 28, 2003
Israel should end occupation if it wants peace Having recently returned from two weeks in Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, I completely agree with Hope Keller that Israel is fighting a war it will never win ("Israel holds the key to ending a war it will never win," Opinion * Commentary, Jan. 12). I traveled with a group called Faculty for Israeli-Palestinian Peace and visited all the major universities in Israel and the occupied territories. Our group was constantly impressed with the dehumanizing nature of the military occupation and its effect on all phases of Palestinian life, including education.
NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | October 8, 2002
THERE IS an art to getting the answers you want by phrasing questions in the right way. For example, ask about 2,000 citizens (sufficient for a scientific sampling) if the United States should invade Osama bin Ladin-friendly Iraq and its demonic tyrant, Saddam Hussein, and even pacifists would be hard-pressed to answer no. That the news media and the Bush administration have cited polls showing Americans support a military attack on Iraq is, in this light, hardly compelling. To ask about overtaking a country whose culture, history and language few of us understand is tantamount to a talk show soliciting callers' opinions about, say, firing the manager of the local team, replacing incumbents in City Hall or changing school mascots.
NEWS
By Moustafa Bayoumi | April 5, 2002
NEW YORK -- There is a dangerous tendency in the United States to view the violence between Israelis and Palestinians as either the product of Palestinian fanaticism or as symmetrical fighting between two warring factions. Many people seem to believe that violence is the inevitable outcome for these two peoples. This ignores a fundamental truth. The suicide bombings must be stopped, but the root of the violence is not pathological terrorism or cynical politics, but a brutal military occupation that has been strangling the Palestinian people for decades.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | December 10, 1994
JERUSALEM -- The three winners of the Nobel Peace Prize left behind a dark cloud of pessimism as they flew to the festivities surrounding their award in Norway today.World figures will applaud the presentation of the prestigious gold medals in Oslo to Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.But their own people are in a glum and sullen mood. Polls this week show 46 percent of Israeli Jews do not think that their leaders should accept the prize along with Mr. Arafat.
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