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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Hours after Congress passed a range of proposals to combat sexual assaults in the armed forces, President Barack Obama ordered military leaders on Friday to conduct a yearlong review of their progress in eliminating rape from the ranks — and threatened further changes if he is not satisfied. "So long as our women and men in uniform face the insider threat of sexual assault, we have an urgent obligation to do more to support victims and hold perpetrators accountable for their crimes," Obama said.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Hours after Congress passed a range of proposals to combat sexual assaults in the armed forces, President Barack Obama ordered military leaders on Friday to conduct a yearlong review of their progress in eliminating rape from the ranks — and threatened further changes if he is not satisfied. "So long as our women and men in uniform face the insider threat of sexual assault, we have an urgent obligation to do more to support victims and hold perpetrators accountable for their crimes," Obama said.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- With U.S. forces in Haiti now outnumbering those of its dictators, the Clinton administration began exploiting a big loophole yesterday in the deal that Jimmy Carter struck Sunday, stepping up pressure on Haitian military leaders to leave the country.The administration appears to be using the Carter agreement as something of a Trojan horse -- a sleight of hand to get thousands of U.S. troops into Haiti in a few days without resistance.Although the Carter pact calls for an amnesty for Haiti's military leaders, State Department spokesman Michael McCurry said that the United States would not recognize any such law unless the Haitian Parliament was first convened by the democratically elected president, the Rev. Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
NEWS
August 15, 2013
After the bloody crackdown on protesters in Egypt on Wednesday, Mohamed ElBaradei, the Nobel peace laureate who had served as vice president and lent a civilian face to what can now only be described as a military dictatorship, resigned in protest. "It has become difficult for me to continue bearing responsibility for decisions that I do not agree with and whose consequences I fear," he wrote in his resignation letter. "I cannot bear the responsibility for one drop of blood. " If only the leaders of the world's oldest democracy, the one that set the precedent for the supremacy of elected, civilian leaders over the military, could muster that same kind of moral clarity.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton has come up with a way to lift the ban on homosexuals in the military that would fulfill a campaign pledge while giving the administration time to work out the details with senior military leaders.Homosexual rights groups applaud the plan. Two homosexual lawmakers, Rep. Gerry E. Studds and Rep. Barney Frank, both Democrats of Massachusetts, were consulted this week, and approved. Military officials say they are pleased that they still will get to have some say on how the change would occur.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 1999
SANTIAGO, Chile -- The arrest of Gen. Augusto Pinochet in London a year ago has opened a quiet and long-postponed reckoning in Chile over its years of dictatorship that is finally bringing former military officers to task for the deaths or disappearances of thousands of political opponents. Since the arrest of Pinochet, the former dictator, 25 officers have been arrested on charges of murder, torture and kidnapping, including a member of one of the juntas that helped rule the country for 17 years after 1973.
NEWS
By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Molly Hennessy-Fiske,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- U.S. military leaders said yesterday that they expect the militant group al-Qaida in Iraq to "lash out" soon in response to the American troop buildup with "spectacular attacks" designed to aggravate sectarian tensions. With military officials set to submit a preliminary progress report on Iraq to Congress in the coming days, Brig. Gen. Kevin Bergner said al-Qaida in Iraq, which U.S. officials believe is linked to Afghanistan-based al-Qaida, is the principal threat to U.S. and Iraqi security forces in Iraq.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - Top U.S. military leaders acknowledged yesterday that the number of insurgent attacks in Iraq has not subsided in the past year, but they denied suggestions the mission was descending into a "quagmire" and stressed that the only way the violence would end is through the creation of political institutions in Iraq. Their statements were in sharp contrast to comments by Vice President Dick Cheney last month that the insurgency was in its "last throes." In a sometimes tense hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld dismissed the call from some lawmakers to create a timetable for withdrawing the 135,000 U.S. troops from the country.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 1999
LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- President Clinton said yesterday that he agreed with his wife that the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy in dealing with homosexuals had been a failure, and he accused military leaders of not enforcing it properly."
NEWS
June 5, 2013
The military's top uniformed leaders did themselves no favors in their testimony Tuesday before the Senate Armed Services Committee about sexual assaults in the military. Certainly, they were willing to give the problem lip service, but in refusing to back the substantial reforms many in the Senate have in mind, they demonstrated that they still take the problem lightly. How is that even possible? In case they missed it, the number of assaults taking place under their command has risen sharply - from about 19,000 in 2010 to about 26,000 last year.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 18, 2013
Maj. Gen. Robert S. Ferrell, senior commander at Aberdeen Proving Ground, received the "Military Leader of the Year" award from the Association of Defense Communities during a ceremony in Washington Thursday. Ferrell, commanding general of the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command, received the award in a breakfast event in the Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill, according to a news release from the Communications-Electronics Command, which is headquartered at APG. Farrell was one of 10 award recipients from across the country honored by the association, a national membership organization which represents 200 communities, states and regions with a significant military presence, and partner organizations.  "This award recognizes an individual from the military whose outstanding leadership has been essential in building and sustaining partnerships with defense communities," Tim Ford, chief executive officer of the association, said.
NEWS
June 5, 2013
The military's top uniformed leaders did themselves no favors in their testimony Tuesday before the Senate Armed Services Committee about sexual assaults in the military. Certainly, they were willing to give the problem lip service, but in refusing to back the substantial reforms many in the Senate have in mind, they demonstrated that they still take the problem lightly. How is that even possible? In case they missed it, the number of assaults taking place under their command has risen sharply - from about 19,000 in 2010 to about 26,000 last year.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
A former instructor at the Naval Academy was sentenced Monday to 60 days in a military jail for indecent acts, fraternization and conduct unbecoming an officer stemming from an incident with two female midshipmen in 2011, an academy spokeswoman said. Marine Corps Maj. Mark Thompson, 43, was also fined $2,500 per month for two years — for a total of $60,000 — and issued a reprimand, a punitive letter that now becomes part of his permanent record, spokeswoman Jenny Erickson said.
NEWS
May 8, 2013
The recent study estimating that there may have been 26,000 cases of sexual assault in the military last year stirred a lot of tough talk from the Pentagon and the White House over the past 24 hours. But the question is whether that outrage will translate into much-needed reforms within the armed forces. On that front, we have our doubts. The U.S. military's failure to adequately address sex crimes within its ranks is hardly a new problem, but the rise of such incidents - up from 19,000 in 2010 - is shocking.
NEWS
August 14, 2012
Egypt's nascent democracy moved a step closer to political maturity over the weekend when President Mohamed Morsi unexpectedly forced the retirement of several senior generals on the military council that has ruled the country since the fall of former President Hosni Mubarak's last year. On Sunday, Mr. Morsi sacked his defense minister, army chief of staff and the chiefs of the navy, the air force and the air defense forces, all of whom were closely associated with the Mubarak era. By replacing them with his own appointees, Mr. Morsi has boldly reasserted the principle of civilian control of the military and thwarted, at least temporarily, the generals' drive to hang onto power in the post-Mubarak era. Mr. Morsi was elected in May in the country's first ever democratic presidential election, and he is acting more swiftly than many expected to consolidate his position.
NEWS
By Jeff Blum | April 9, 2012
When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, many strategists suggested that the Cold War arms race had bankrupted its economy and caused its downfall. More than 20 years later, it appears that some in Washington are driving the U.S. toward a similar fate. Most recently, House Republicans (led by Rep. Paul Ryan) introduced a budget that both lavishly funds the Pentagon and slashes domestic programs. Mr. Ryan has even questioned whether generals were being honest in their assessment of the president's budget, suggesting, "We don't think the generals are giving us their true advice.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Staff Writer Staff writer John Fairhall contributed to this article | November 16, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- Several key senators warned President-elect Bill Clinton yesterday to go slowly on his pledge to lift the ban on homosexuals in the military.The cautions came just before Mr. Clinton met in Little Rock with Democratic congressional leaders, hoping to forge a relationship that will ease the way for his aggressive agenda to avoid Washington gridlock and be enacted smoothly.Giving a dinner at the governor's mansion for Speaker of the House Thomas S. Foley, Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell and House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt, Mr. Clinton said he hoped to convince his Democratic colleagues about the task before them.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2003
One year ago, a group studying military ethics at the Naval Academy began thinking that corporate executives and military leaders - both painfully aware of how ethical lapses can harm an institution - could learn something from each other. The result was a meeting of the minds yesterday that included speeches by U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes; retired Adm. James D. Watkins, a former U.S. energy secretary; Ronald D. Sugar, chief executive officer of Northrop Grumman; and ethics expert Amitai Etzioni.
NEWS
January 16, 2012
News that the U.S. has resumed drone strikes in Pakistan, killing at least three suspected militants last week in the tribal areas of North Waziristan along that country's border with Afghanistan, could hardly come at a more delicate moment for U.S.-Pakistani relations. Rather than signal an improvement in ties between the two uneasy allies in the war against Islamic insurgents, it may end up pushing the two sides even further apart - or, in the worst case, precipitating a rupture.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2011
Public Broadcasting Service's recent documentary on the War of 1812 failed to include the historic and decisive Battle of North Point, where British forces were repulsed by American regulars, militiamen and Baltimoreans under the command of Gen. Sam Smith. The Battle of North Point was, as local railroad historian Martin K. Van Horn noted in a letter last week in The Baltimore Sun, "one of the few land battles the Americans won against the British," who were forced to withdraw, thus saving Baltimore from being invaded and occupied.
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