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By MAURA REYNOLDS and MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- White House officials have agreed that Congress can use existing military law as the basis for developing a system for prosecuting war detainees in U.S. custody, key senators said yesterday - a position that differs from testimony earlier this week from Pentagon and administration lawyers. The varying government positions reflect apparent divisions within the Bush administration as lawmakers set about reworking detainee policies in the wake of a Supreme Court ruling last month striking down much of the system President Bush put in place after the Sept.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
A former Naval Academy football player who is accused of sexually assaulting a fellow midshipman is moving toward a court-martial next month, officials said Tuesday. Jason Ehrenberg, a civilian attorney for Midshipman Joshua Tate, said the military judge in the case told prosecutors and defense attorneys this week that he planned to deny motions to dismiss the case. "We're going forward," Ehrenberg said. The judge, Marine Col. Daniel Daugherty, has not yet issued his rulings, and a Naval Academy spokesman said it would be improper to comment on a pending case.
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NEWS
August 21, 2013
Col. Denise R. Lind, the Army judge who sentenced Pfc. Bradley Manning to 35 years in prison today after finding him guilty of turning hundreds of thousands of classified documents over to the anti-secrecy site WikiLeaks, clearly did not buy prosecutors' arguments that he was a self-aggrandizing traitor who deserved to spend the rest of his life behind bars. Nor did she completely accept the defense's claim that Mr. Manning was an emotionally troubled young man who had acted only out of patriotism to alert Americans to what he perceived to be government wrongdoing committed in their name.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Military prosecutors are seeking to dismiss charges against one of the Naval Academy midshipmen accused of sexually assaulting a female classmate, according to the woman's attorney. Midshipman Eric Graham, a senior from Eight Mile, Ala., is facing a court-martial this month on charges of abusive sexual contact and making a false statement in connection with the alleged assault at an off-campus party in 2012. But prosecutors lost the use of key evidence in pre-trial hearings and will ask the Naval Academy superintendent to drop the case, said Ryan Guilds, a Washington attorney who represents the woman.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 17, 2004
MIAMI - The Pentagon's chief prosecutor has quietly called for three of six colonels to be removed from the panel judging war crimes cases at Guantanamo - a move that could call into question the Bush administration's plan for trying suspects in the war on terror. Army Col. Robert Swann made the surprise request Sept. 7. It was made public this week. Swann agreed with defense lawyers that the three officers are unsuitable to act as judge and jury in the cases. One key issue is whether U.S. military officers who helped capture the alleged terrorists could be impartial.
EXPLORE
May 18, 2012
Army Maj. Melissa Covolesky, of Mount Airy, will graduate from The Army's Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School on Thursday, May 24, with a Master of Laws in military law and a specialty in international law. Covolesky, is the daughter of Brice Ridgely, of Cooksville; and the late Barbara Koontz Rose, of Ellicott City. She graduated from Glenelg High School in 1986 and went on to graduate from Western Maryland College in 1990. In January 2012, Covolesky was admitted to practice before theU.S.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
One of the Naval Academy midshipmen accused of sexually assaulting a classmate is seeking to join a lawsuit, filed by the alleged victim, that calls for the academy superintendent to be removed from the case. Midshipman Joshua Tate is seeking "intervenor" status in the federal lawsuit, arguing that Vice Adm. Michael Miller, the superintendent, is biased against him. Tate's attorney, Jason Ehrenberg, argued in a court filing Tuesday that Miller ordered a court-martial for Tate even after the military judge who held a preliminary hearing, and Miller's own legal representative, advised against doing so. Under military law, Miller is not bound to follow the recommendations of the investigating officer.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
A former Naval Academy football player who is accused of sexually assaulting a fellow midshipman is moving toward a court-martial next month, officials said Tuesday. Jason Ehrenberg, a civilian attorney for Midshipman Joshua Tate, said the military judge in the case told prosecutors and defense attorneys this week that he planned to deny motions to dismiss the case. "We're going forward," Ehrenberg said. The judge, Marine Col. Daniel Daugherty, has not yet issued his rulings, and a Naval Academy spokesman said it would be improper to comment on a pending case.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Two former Naval Academy football players will stand trial early next year on charges that they sexually assaulted a classmate. Midshipman Eric Graham's court-martial is scheduled for Jan. 27 and Midshipman Joshua Tate's court-martial is scheduled for Feb. 10, according to Naval Academy officials. Graham, a senior at the academy from Eight Mile, Ala., is charged with abusive sexual contact, and Tate, a junior from Nashville, Tenn., is charged with aggravated sexual assault. Both are charged with making false official statements.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Military prosecutors are seeking to dismiss charges against one of the Naval Academy midshipmen accused of sexually assaulting a female classmate, according to the woman's attorney. Midshipman Eric Graham, a senior from Eight Mile, Ala., is facing a court-martial this month on charges of abusive sexual contact and making a false statement in connection with the alleged assault at an off-campus party in 2012. But prosecutors lost the use of key evidence in pre-trial hearings and will ask the Naval Academy superintendent to drop the case, said Ryan Guilds, a Washington attorney who represents the woman.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Two former Naval Academy football players will stand trial early next year on charges that they sexually assaulted a classmate. Midshipman Eric Graham's court-martial is scheduled for Jan. 27 and Midshipman Joshua Tate's court-martial is scheduled for Feb. 10, according to Naval Academy officials. Graham, a senior at the academy from Eight Mile, Ala., is charged with abusive sexual contact, and Tate, a junior from Nashville, Tenn., is charged with aggravated sexual assault. Both are charged with making false official statements.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
One of the Naval Academy midshipmen accused of sexually assaulting a classmate is seeking to join a lawsuit, filed by the alleged victim, that calls for the academy superintendent to be removed from the case. Midshipman Joshua Tate is seeking "intervenor" status in the federal lawsuit, arguing that Vice Adm. Michael Miller, the superintendent, is biased against him. Tate's attorney, Jason Ehrenberg, argued in a court filing Tuesday that Miller ordered a court-martial for Tate even after the military judge who held a preliminary hearing, and Miller's own legal representative, advised against doing so. Under military law, Miller is not bound to follow the recommendations of the investigating officer.
NEWS
August 21, 2013
Col. Denise R. Lind, the Army judge who sentenced Pfc. Bradley Manning to 35 years in prison today after finding him guilty of turning hundreds of thousands of classified documents over to the anti-secrecy site WikiLeaks, clearly did not buy prosecutors' arguments that he was a self-aggrandizing traitor who deserved to spend the rest of his life behind bars. Nor did she completely accept the defense's claim that Mr. Manning was an emotionally troubled young man who had acted only out of patriotism to alert Americans to what he perceived to be government wrongdoing committed in their name.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
At first, the soldier's behavior was puzzling. He appeared to be having hallucinations. He was anxious. He became belligerent. A drug test identified the problem: The young man had become the latest service member at Fort Meade to experience an adverse reaction to synthetic marijuana. Commanders at the Army base in Anne Arundel County, home to the National Security Agency, the U.S. Cyber Command and other sensitive activities, are cracking down on cheap, widely available and dangerous marijuana substitutes that have been linked nationally to suicides and homicides.
EXPLORE
May 18, 2012
Army Maj. Melissa Covolesky, of Mount Airy, will graduate from The Army's Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School on Thursday, May 24, with a Master of Laws in military law and a specialty in international law. Covolesky, is the daughter of Brice Ridgely, of Cooksville; and the late Barbara Koontz Rose, of Ellicott City. She graduated from Glenelg High School in 1986 and went on to graduate from Western Maryland College in 1990. In January 2012, Covolesky was admitted to practice before theU.S.
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS and MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- White House officials have agreed that Congress can use existing military law as the basis for developing a system for prosecuting war detainees in U.S. custody, key senators said yesterday - a position that differs from testimony earlier this week from Pentagon and administration lawyers. The varying government positions reflect apparent divisions within the Bush administration as lawmakers set about reworking detainee policies in the wake of a Supreme Court ruling last month striking down much of the system President Bush put in place after the Sept.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 19, 2004
The low-ranking U.S. soldiers accused of abusing Iraqi prisoners at Abu Ghraib have lined up almost uniformly behind a single defense strategy, one that military law experts say typically is no defense at all. As the first public court proceedings in the abuse scandal get under way today, lawyers for most of the seven accused Army reservists contend the soldiers are not responsible because they were obeying orders. It is a claim that historically has failed. "The idea of `We were just following orders' didn't survive the Nuremberg trials very well," Kevin J. Barry, a retired Coast Guard captain and former military judge, said, referring to the World War II war crimes trials in which German soldiers were convicted of operating Nazi death camps.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 7, 2004
As they scrambled to appease the Muslim world with sharp rebukes of the U.S. soldiers accused of mistreating Iraqi prisoners, President Bush and Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld may have jeopardized a basic protection of military law - the idea that commanding officers should not prejudge cases where they ultimately could determine a soldier's fate. In the hierarchical world of the military courts, it is the doctrine known as "command influence." And in the growing abuse scandal, military lawyers and legal scholars say efforts over the past few days to salvage America's image in the Middle East may have come at the expense of basic fair trial rules for the accused soldiers.
NEWS
By NICHOLAS RICCARDI and NICHOLAS RICCARDI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 25, 2006
DENVER -- Soldiers prosecuted for abusing or killing detainees rarely have paid a heavy price, an indication of the difficulties the U.S. military has had sorting out right from wrong during the war on terrorism, human rights groups and military attorneys say. A report to be released next week by Human Rights First has found that service members were disciplined in 12 of the 33 cases in which detainees' deaths were ruled homicides. Often that punishment was relatively mild, as was the case for Chief Warrant Officer Lewis Welshofer Jr. Charged with murder in the death of an Iraqi general during an interrogation session, Welshofer was convicted last week of lesser offenses.
NEWS
By SACRAMENTO BEE | May 29, 2005
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - While recent media attention has focused on the congressional fight over women in combat, a lower-profile battle has been waged on Capitol Hill to force the Department of Defense to address the issue of sexual assault in the military. Provisions including an honest accounting of the availability of rape exam kits in Iraq and a broader definition of sexual assault were contained in a key defense bill passed by the House of Representatives last week. The proposals, which will face a vote of the Senate in the coming weeks, include the military's first rape law changes since 1992, when marital rape and same-sex rape were criminalized.
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