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By STEVE CHAPMAN | July 27, 2007
CHICAGO -- During the Democratic debate in South Carolina, I heard something I never expected to hear: Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton coming out against U.S. military intervention. At least I think she was coming out against U.S. military intervention. Asked if U.S. troops should be sent to Darfur, the New York Democrat made a valiant effort to dodge the question by declaiming about sanctions, divestment and U.N. peacekeepers. But when pressed, "How about American troops on the ground?" she finally said, a bit awkwardly, "American ground troops I don't think belong in Darfur at this time."
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NEWS
By David Rieff | April 30, 1993
THE Clinton administration is considering limited bombing raids on Serb positions in Bosnia and lifting the arms embargo against the Bosnian government.However welcome and even long overdue such actions may be, if the goal is to stop the genocide of the Muslims, neither step will be sufficient.There appears to be a consensus in Washington that full-scale military intervention, including ground troops, is the one thing that must be avoided at all costs. But such a commitment is also the one thing that is likely to make a real difference.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 23, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In a signal that the Bush administration is inching toward possible military intervention in Yugoslavia, National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft said that the conflict in the Balkans could soon become a threat to the security of the United States and its European allies."
NEWS
June 20, 2014
While there may be hard choices in Iraq, military intervention in that nation is not warranted considering the role that Iran has played in supporting the government of Prime Minister Nouri Kamal al-Maliki ( "Hard choice in Iraq," June 16). Certainly, the international community including the U.S. has made tragic mistakes in the ongoing conflict in the Middle East, but only minimal diplomatic intervention for the time being should be considered. The obvious solution at the present is to withdraw from the now escalating war between Shiites and Sunnis, particularly in light of the more radical elements gaining control.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Kweisi Mfume of Baltimore declared yesterday that President Clinton's threat to send U.S. troops to Haiti "should have been there all along," given the violence being inflicted by that nation's military rulers.Charging that Haitians are "being hacked to death and fed to animals" while the United States futilely calls for change, Mr. Mfume, chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, was among several members of Maryland's delegation who applauded Mr. Clinton's newly hardened stance.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 18, 1994
WASHINGTON -- While some politicians stake out a position and defend it, other politicians stake out several positions so they never have to defend anything.If there is an invasion of Haiti and it goes well, Kweisi Mfume will be able to say he was for it.But if there is an invasion of Haiti and it goes poorly, Kweisi Mfume will be able to say he never was for it.That's the advantage of being multi-faceted.I have put together a list of Mfume's twists, turns, and leaps over the last 11 months:Oct.
NEWS
By Thomas Carothers | May 13, 1994
SCRAMBLING to revive its moribund Haiti policy, the Clinton administration has decided to rule out a compromise with the country's military leaders and to broaden economic sanctions.The one certain effect of this new policy will be to greatly increase the possibility of U.S. military intervention.Faced with the tightened embargo, which will go into effect next week, Haiti's rulers will not just throw up their hands and go. They will engage in political maneuvering, such as Wednesday's installation of the 80-year-old Supreme Court Justice Emile Jonassaint as "provisional president."
NEWS
By JOHN M. McCLINTOCK and JOHN M. McCLINTOCK,John McClintock is The Sun's Mexico City correspondent | October 6, 1991
Mexico City. -- Last week's overthrow of Haiti's first democratically elected president may for the first time spark joint military action by the Organization of American States (OAS).If so, the action to reinstall President Jean-Bertrand Aristide would mark a turning point for a 43-year-old organization that has been little more than an obscure debating society long dominated by the United States.The OAS early Thursday voted to send its secretary general and representatives of eight countries to read the riot act to the military junta in Port-au-Prince.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The United States will begin sending about 600 military trainers and engineers to Haiti on Thursday as part of a United Nations-backed plan to stabilize the country and restore its exiled president, administration officials said.A U.S. Navy ship is scheduled to depart Norfolk, Va., Thursday with about 250 military specialists and tons of construction equipment aboard, then pick up scores of Navy engineers in Puerto Rico before arriving in Port-au-Prince Oct. 10, the officials said.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
The dean of Maryland's congressional delegation and a prominent voice in the liberal wing of the Democratic Party, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, said on Monday that she supports giving President Barack Obama authorization to strike Syria. "I believe the president's plan is the best response to protecting U.S. security interests in the region," Mikulski, the chairwoman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, said during a lengthy speech on the Senate floor. "Therefore…after really great reflection and as much due diligence as I could do, I want to announce today to my colleagues and most of all to the people of Maryland who have supported me, that I will support the president's request for a targeted, limited military action against the Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime in response to the horrific, grim and ghoulish use of chemical weapons," she said.
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