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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
Charles Robert Fisher, a retired professor of military history whose colorful lectures brought to life for generations of University of Baltimore students not only the diplomatic and political events that lead to wars but also the traits of those who fought them, died Monday of complications from a stroke at a hospital in Mechanicsburg, Pa. The Taneytown resident was 76. "He was a great influence on his students and not only a credit to the military but...
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Terence T. Finn, a retired NASA executive who boosted the Space Shuttle program and whose passion for military history fueled four books on the subject, died June 27 of a blood platelet disorder. The Eastern Shore resident was 71. Dr. Finn, a New York native, spent his working life in the Washington area as a federal employee, first as a legislative assistant to Sen. Joseph D. Tydings, a Maryland Democrat. Dr. Finn worked on Capitol Hill from 1966 to 1977, in staff positions that included senior counsel for energy, science and space at the Senate Budget Committee.
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FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | July 3, 2006
The barrel-chested officer and the spry colonel beside him stride forward with grim military purpose, chins thrust forward as if they're leading a division into battle. As drawn by Richard Yardley, The Sun's late longtime cartoonist, the two commanders, Thomas McNeal and Roger Whiteford, exude the gravitas you would expect of the leaders of Baltimore's 175th Infantry Regiment - a unit that had contributed mightily to the Allied victory in Normandy 11 years before. Richard Yardley's National Guard cartoons will be on display at the Maryland Museum of Military History at the 5th Regiment Armory, 219 29th Division St., through December.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
As a passionate aerospace buff and American taxpayer, I'm discouraged a man of Capt. Gregory McWherter's talent, training and expertise would be relieved of his Blue Angels command based on allegations of a "nasty work environment. " I've read Susan Reimer 's account ( "Where are all the heroes?" April 28) and searched the Internet for what exactly Captain McWherter said or did, and I could find nothing. The word "allegation" is everywhere, yet there's no mention of the person or persons who filed these sexual harassment complaints.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Terence T. Finn, a retired NASA executive who boosted the Space Shuttle program and whose passion for military history fueled four books on the subject, died June 27 of a blood platelet disorder. The Eastern Shore resident was 71. Dr. Finn, a New York native, spent his working life in the Washington area as a federal employee, first as a legislative assistant to Sen. Joseph D. Tydings, a Maryland Democrat. Dr. Finn worked on Capitol Hill from 1966 to 1977, in staff positions that included senior counsel for energy, science and space at the Senate Budget Committee.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
On Twitter the Library of Congress has retweeted this morsel from the WorldDigitalLibrary: "Battle of #Antietam was #OnThisDay in 1862. 23,000 killed. ... " The Libraryof Congress should know better. The butcher's bill* for Antietam, the 23,000, is the number of casualties . The number of dead, Union and Confederate combined, in the bloodiest day in U.S. military history, was 3,650; wounded, over 17,000; missing or captured, nearly 1,800.    *The mordant nineteenth-century term, often attributed to Admiral Lord Nelson, for the human costs of a battle.   
EXPLORE
May 13, 2013
Marine Corps Pfc. Stephen N. Hill, son of Bonnie L. and Vernon W. Hill of Bel Air, earned the title of U.S. Marine after graduating from recruit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C. For 13 weeks, Hill stayed committed during some of the world's most demanding entry-level military training to be transformed from civilian to marine instilled with pride, discipline and the core values of honor, courage and commitment. Training subjects included close-order drill, marksmanship with an M-16A4 rifle, physical fitness, martial arts, swimming, military history, customs and courtesies.
NEWS
June 26, 2003
Richard James Sanford, an industrial salesman and military history buff, died of cancer Tuesday at his Catonsville home. He was 76. Mr. Sanford was born in Philadelphia and raised in Baltimore on North Broadway. After graduating from Boys' Latin School in 1944, he enlisted in the Canadian army. "He ran away and joined the Canadian army and served in Canada at a prisoner of war camp," said a son, Richard James Sanford III of Mount Airy. After being discharged in 1946 with the rank of captain, Mr. Sanford earned his bachelor's degree at the University of Toronto.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2005
Mike Eilerman, a former Marine who served two tours of duty in Vietnam, said he's noticed a difference in his son since Ryan joined the Jarrettsville Young Marines a year and a half ago. "It's making a better person out of him," Eilerman said. "I can see a big difference out of him. For 11 years old, he's very mature. I think it has to do with the discipline and the things he's learned." As a member of the Young Marines, Ryan, a sixth-grader at Mountain Christian School near Fallston, endured a 26-hour boot camp, is learning about military history and flag etiquette, and has gone on several camping trips.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | February 3, 1991
When ABC newswoman Diane Sawyer wanted to know about the U.S. Army'sM-1 tanks, she went to see William F. Atwater at the U.S. Ordnance Museum at Aberdeen Proving Ground.Atwater's job as curator of the museum has turned him into a walking reference book of military history since war erupted in the Persian Gulf. But that doesn't surprise him."We're sort of the official repository of military history," he said.Atwater estimates that the museum is getting about 40 telephone calls a week for information on military tactics, equipment and practices --everything from dog tags to mine fields.
NEWS
October 6, 2013
My wife and I were deeply saddened to learn of the death of our friend, Tom Clancy. The Tom Clancy we were privileged to know was kind and thoughtful to others, a devoted father, passionate and deeply loyal to his Orioles and native Baltimore. He gave generously to medical research at Johns Hopkins, was a genuine American patriot and friend to all those who serve in our armed forces and their families, was an expert student of military history and especially tactical and strategic command decisions, and had a unique and gifted imagination and ability to tell a story all the world could enjoy.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Some people read military history for the technical details--why General X failed to match Hanibal's pincer movement at Cannae. Others, like me, dip into it to see how individuals and societies respond to circumstances of immense stress. Victor Davis Hanson explores these larger dimensions of wars in The Savior Generals (Bloomsbury Press, 305 pages, $28). He takes five commanders from classical antiquity to today to explore how they went into losing wars and salvaged the situation.
EXPLORE
May 13, 2013
Marine Corps Pfc. Stephen N. Hill, son of Bonnie L. and Vernon W. Hill of Bel Air, earned the title of U.S. Marine after graduating from recruit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C. For 13 weeks, Hill stayed committed during some of the world's most demanding entry-level military training to be transformed from civilian to marine instilled with pride, discipline and the core values of honor, courage and commitment. Training subjects included close-order drill, marksmanship with an M-16A4 rifle, physical fitness, martial arts, swimming, military history, customs and courtesies.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
On Twitter the Library of Congress has retweeted this morsel from the WorldDigitalLibrary: "Battle of #Antietam was #OnThisDay in 1862. 23,000 killed. ... " The Libraryof Congress should know better. The butcher's bill* for Antietam, the 23,000, is the number of casualties . The number of dead, Union and Confederate combined, in the bloodiest day in U.S. military history, was 3,650; wounded, over 17,000; missing or captured, nearly 1,800.    *The mordant nineteenth-century term, often attributed to Admiral Lord Nelson, for the human costs of a battle.   
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
One harsh winter long ago, as he led an encampment of soldiers near a European forest, it never occurred to Alfred H.M. Shehab, then a brash young Army lieutenant, that he and his 30-man unit were a part of military history. "A platoon leader is so busy thinking about what might happen and how to make things go right" that it's hard to grasp much of a broader perspective, says Shehab, a 91-year-old retired lieutenant colonel who lives near Fort Meade. As it was, the 3rd Platoon of B Troop in the 38th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | August 17, 2009
With heavy equipment trailers, forklifts, towing cables and cranes capable of hoisting 120 tons, the U.S. Army began the largest museum move in its history this month. About 60 pieces from the U.S. Army Ordnance Museum at Aberdeen Proving Ground were loaded and shipped 200 miles south to Fort Lee, Va., where a much grander facility will soon be under construction. The move was the first of a three-phase relocation to the new facility, which will be nearly triple the size of the old. Given the massive and unwieldy nature of the collection, including dozens of tanks weighing many tons, movers tackled the outdoor exhibits first.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | January 17, 2009
Conrad Angelo Utanes Jr., known as "CJ" to friends and family, had a passion for the guitar and the Beatles, military history and strategy games, and his trademark long hair, which he dubbed "my pride." The Dulaney High School senior also had a goal - documented as far back as his third- and fifth-grade years - to join the U.S. Army. That desire, no matter how much his parents balked, never changed. "Dad, you know that I'm not cut out for college," Conrado G. Utanes recalled his son saying.
NEWS
October 6, 2013
My wife and I were deeply saddened to learn of the death of our friend, Tom Clancy. The Tom Clancy we were privileged to know was kind and thoughtful to others, a devoted father, passionate and deeply loyal to his Orioles and native Baltimore. He gave generously to medical research at Johns Hopkins, was a genuine American patriot and friend to all those who serve in our armed forces and their families, was an expert student of military history and especially tactical and strategic command decisions, and had a unique and gifted imagination and ability to tell a story all the world could enjoy.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | January 17, 2009
Conrad Angelo Utanes Jr., known as "CJ" to friends and family, had a passion for the guitar and the Beatles, military history and strategy games, and his trademark long hair, which he dubbed "my pride." The Dulaney High School senior also had a goal - documented as far back as his third- and fifth-grade years - to join the U.S. Army. That desire, no matter how much his parents balked, never changed. "Dad, you know that I'm not cut out for college," Conrado G. Utanes recalled his son saying.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,rona.marech@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
One captain in the Marine Corps had to sign the confining orders to send a lesbian to jail, but was so disturbed that the next day the officer, who was also gay, submitted his resignation papers. Another man, from the Naval Academy Class of 1958, was kicked out of the military because his name was found in the address book of a "known homosexual." Other gay men and lesbians left the service because like Steve Clark Hall, a nuclear submarine captain who retired after a 20-year Navy career, they could no longer bear the burden of harboring an enormous secret about their identity.
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