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NEWS
November 20, 1992
Benazir Bhutto is not the Pakistani government's biggest problem, but its best-known. Since President Ghulam Ishaq Khan with questionable constitutionality dismissed her from the prime ministry in 1990, the conditions he cited as justification have grown worse.The rampant criminality in Sindh province in the south threatens to break down society and scare off foreign capital. The corruption attributed to her husband's family can't compare with the larger sell-offs of state enterprises by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's family.
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NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 18, 2006
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- Defiled by grave robbers, banished from the presidential grounds and sliced for DNA samples, the battered remains of former Argentine President Juan Domingo Peron was moved yesterday to a new monument where enthusiasts hope the remains of his celebrated former wife Eva "Evita" Peron will one day join him. But violent clashes among rival union groups at the mausoleum site southwest of Buenos Aires marred the planned ceremony....
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NEWS
December 7, 1993
The good news is that Venezuela elected a president to keep its 35 years of democracy going, escaping the rumored threat of a military coup.The bad news is that the winner, Rafael Caldera, will be 78 at the start of his five-year term next year, that his mandate is only 28.5 percent of the vote, and that he ran as a maverick backed by 17 parties ranging from crypto-Fascist to Communist that can agree on nothing else.The problem for the disgusted Venezuelan electorate was to reject the corruption of the deposed President Carlos Andres Perez, reject the Tweedle-dum and Tweedle-Dee of the two-party politics that succeeded military dictatorship in 1958, and yet not succumb to the lure of military dictatorship again.
NEWS
By Kenneth Y. Best | January 25, 2004
WHEREVER I WENT during my eight days in Monrovia when Liberia's transitional government was being installed, I was besieged by people -- newspaper vendors, politicians and business people -- demanding to know not if but when I would return to resume publication of the newspaper, The Daily Observer. That experience in October presented me with a real and serious challenge: to ensure the newspaper is on the market again soon after nearly 15 years of dormancy. The Daily Observer survived five closures, several staff imprisonments and two arson attacks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 18, 1998
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- From the stately gates, which are as close as most civilians can approach, the colonnaded buildings of the Navy Mechanics School here offer little hint of the atrocities that took place inside during the military dictatorship that ended 15 years ago.And if the government of President Carlos Saul Menem has its way, Argentines will never get so much as a glimpse inside the school, once a notorious interrogation center where an...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 29, 1995
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Three months after President Jean-Bertrand Aristide returned to power promising justice and reconciliation, Haitians are clamoring for his government to begin prosecuting the soldiers, police officers and paramilitary gunmen who killed, robbed and pillaged during three years of military dictatorship.Father Aristide has been dismantling the repressive military and police apparatus since he returned Oct. 15.The court and penal system -- universally condemned as corrupt, incompetent and unfair -- has collapsed.
NEWS
By Kenneth Y. Best | January 25, 2004
WHEREVER I WENT during my eight days in Monrovia when Liberia's transitional government was being installed, I was besieged by people -- newspaper vendors, politicians and business people -- demanding to know not if but when I would return to resume publication of the newspaper, The Daily Observer. That experience in October presented me with a real and serious challenge: to ensure the newspaper is on the market again soon after nearly 15 years of dormancy. The Daily Observer survived five closures, several staff imprisonments and two arson attacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 1, 1994
"The House of the Spirits" seems more like the "House of Wax" than anything else. It's a museum of stiffs clumsily pretending to human behavior while hoping their makeup doesn't melt.It's also a wretched paradox: a big budget, star-driven art film whose very elements subvert its ambitions and turn it into the thing it least wants to be -- a listless '50s-style Hollywood melodrama. Perhaps a melancholy Dane like Bille August wasn't the right man to direct a tale of South American mysticism and violence, particularly when he had to work with a generic set of stars who never transcend their showbiz identities.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 2002
ATHENS, Greece - Greek police arrested a suspected leader of the November 17 terrorist group yesterday and identified another key figure in custody as a gunman in the first of its more than 20 assassinations - that of the CIA station chief here in 1975. Authorities are moving to crush one of the longest-lived groups to emerge from Europe's radical left three decades ago. After making no progress for 27 years, Greek police have made stunning advances in recent weeks, arresting both suspected leaders and rank-and-file members.
NEWS
By Reed Lindsay and Reed Lindsay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2003
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Cesar Castillo never looked like any of his relatives, and he grew up feeling something was wrong. They were short, with dark skin and mestizo features. He was of a paler shade, he had corkscrew curly hair, and by the age of 11 he was taller than his father. Moreover, he seemed to have inherited a diametrically opposing personality to his parents. While they were conservative, reserved and submissive, he was liberal, outgoing and an effusive talker who gesticulated wildly with his hands.
NEWS
By Reed Lindsay and Reed Lindsay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2003
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Cesar Castillo never looked like any of his relatives, and he grew up feeling something was wrong. They were short, with dark skin and mestizo features. He was of a paler shade, he had corkscrew curly hair, and by the age of 11 he was taller than his father. Moreover, he seemed to have inherited a diametrically opposing personality to his parents. While they were conservative, reserved and submissive, he was liberal, outgoing and an effusive talker who gesticulated wildly with his hands.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 2002
ATHENS, Greece - Greek police arrested a suspected leader of the November 17 terrorist group yesterday and identified another key figure in custody as a gunman in the first of its more than 20 assassinations - that of the CIA station chief here in 1975. Authorities are moving to crush one of the longest-lived groups to emerge from Europe's radical left three decades ago. After making no progress for 27 years, Greek police have made stunning advances in recent weeks, arresting both suspected leaders and rank-and-file members.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 18, 1998
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- From the stately gates, which are as close as most civilians can approach, the colonnaded buildings of the Navy Mechanics School here offer little hint of the atrocities that took place inside during the military dictatorship that ended 15 years ago.And if the government of President Carlos Saul Menem has its way, Argentines will never get so much as a glimpse inside the school, once a notorious interrogation center where an...
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 22, 1997
SEOUL, South Korea -- Imprisoned former Presidents Chun Doo Hwan and Roh Tae Woo were freed this morning after the Cabinet approved a pardon issued by President Kim Young Sam.The decision to release Chun and Roh, who have been imprisoned since 1995 for mutiny, treason and bribery, was reached jointly by Kim and his newly elected successor, veteran opposition leader Kim Dae Jung, at a meeting Saturday over lunch at the presidential Blue House."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 29, 1995
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Three months after President Jean-Bertrand Aristide returned to power promising justice and reconciliation, Haitians are clamoring for his government to begin prosecuting the soldiers, police officers and paramilitary gunmen who killed, robbed and pillaged during three years of military dictatorship.Father Aristide has been dismantling the repressive military and police apparatus since he returned Oct. 15.The court and penal system -- universally condemned as corrupt, incompetent and unfair -- has collapsed.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Anyone who has seen the television pictures of Haitian refugees struggling to escape drowning as their sailboat sank during a U.S. Coast Guard rescue mission, or of Haitian children being fed to ward off starvation, cannot fail to grasp the severity of the situation on that troubled Caribbean island.As a result, efforts by the Clinton administration to ameliorate the suffering should be generating widespread sympathy and support. But the signals of U.S. intent once again are so confusing that Americans are left to wonder, and fear, that the administration is playing another dangerous foreign policy crisis by ear.For the second time in two days, the administration appeared to be changing its mind on what to do with the thousands of Haitian boat people attempting to flee the island.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Anyone who has seen the television pictures of Haitian refugees struggling to escape drowning as their sailboat sank during a U.S. Coast Guard rescue mission, or of Haitian children being fed to ward off starvation, cannot fail to grasp the severity of the situation on that troubled Caribbean island.As a result, efforts by the Clinton administration to ameliorate the suffering should be generating widespread sympathy and support. But the signals of U.S. intent once again are so confusing that Americans are left to wonder, and fear, that the administration is playing another dangerous foreign policy crisis by ear.For the second time in two days, the administration appeared to be changing its mind on what to do with the thousands of Haitian boat people attempting to flee the island.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 18, 2006
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- Defiled by grave robbers, banished from the presidential grounds and sliced for DNA samples, the battered remains of former Argentine President Juan Domingo Peron was moved yesterday to a new monument where enthusiasts hope the remains of his celebrated former wife Eva "Evita" Peron will one day join him. But violent clashes among rival union groups at the mausoleum site southwest of Buenos Aires marred the planned ceremony....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | April 1, 1994
"The House of the Spirits" seems more like the "House of Wax" than anything else. It's a museum of stiffs clumsily pretending to human behavior while hoping their makeup doesn't melt.It's also a wretched paradox: a big budget, star-driven art film whose very elements subvert its ambitions and turn it into the thing it least wants to be -- a listless '50s-style Hollywood melodrama. Perhaps a melancholy Dane like Bille August wasn't the right man to direct a tale of South American mysticism and violence, particularly when he had to work with a generic set of stars who never transcend their showbiz identities.
NEWS
December 7, 1993
The good news is that Venezuela elected a president to keep its 35 years of democracy going, escaping the rumored threat of a military coup.The bad news is that the winner, Rafael Caldera, will be 78 at the start of his five-year term next year, that his mandate is only 28.5 percent of the vote, and that he ran as a maverick backed by 17 parties ranging from crypto-Fascist to Communist that can agree on nothing else.The problem for the disgusted Venezuelan electorate was to reject the corruption of the deposed President Carlos Andres Perez, reject the Tweedle-dum and Tweedle-Dee of the two-party politics that succeeded military dictatorship in 1958, and yet not succumb to the lure of military dictatorship again.
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