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NEWS
By John Hendren and David Zucchino and John Hendren and David Zucchino,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 20, 2003
HILLAH, Iraq - U.S. Deputy Defense Secretary Paul D. Wolfowitz, a chief architect of the war, insisted yesterday that the U.S. military is committed to Iraq, and he spoke passionately about the need to bring members of Saddam Hussein's government to justice. "We're not playing any games with Saddam Hussein," Wolfowitz said, bristling at the suggestion of a local official from the southern city of Karbala that the United States isn't doing everything it can to capture Hussein. "The sooner we catch that bastard - excuse me - the better off everybody will be."
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Four years after the fall of Baghdad, the White House is again struggling to solve an old problem: Who is in charge of carrying out policy in Iraq? Once again President Bush and his top aides are searching for a high-level coordinator capable of cutting through military, political and reconstruction strategies that have never operated in sync, in Washington or in Baghdad. Once again Bush is publicly declaring that his administration has settled on a strategy for victory - this time, a troop increase that is supposed to open political space for Sunnis and Shiites to live and govern together - even while his top aides acknowledge that the White House has never gotten the execution right.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Commanders in the U.S. military's most elite Special Operations unit are contending that their troops should be freed from the fruitless hunt in Afghanistan for Osama bin Laden, military and intelligence officials say. Some senior officers in the Joint Special Operations Command have concluded that bin Laden, the leader of al-Qaida, was probably killed in the U.S. bombing raid at Tora Bora in December, officials said. They believe he died in a bombing raid on one of several caves that had been targeted because U.S. intelligence officials thought they housed al-Qaida leaders.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 30, 1998
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- In a historic step toward transforming the military here, the Soviet-trained former commander of the main anti-apartheid guerrilla force was appointed the first black chief of the South African National Defense Force yesterday.Lt. Gen. Siphiwe Nyanda led Umkhonto we Sizwe, the armed wing of the African National Congress, at the end of the struggle against the apartheid system.He inherits a 93,000-strong force in the throes of change, facing defense spending cuts and rattled by an intelligence fiasco that led to his predecessor's sudden resignation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | March 17, 2010
I f it is true, as Napoleon said, that an army moves on its stomach, then some Army reservists at Fort Meade will soon be soldiering in style. Sgt. 1st Class James Duff, a food service specialist with the 200th Military Police Command, will be reporting for duty at Fort Meade this month. This is the mess-hall equivalent, I gather, of having Maryland sharpshooter Greivis Vasquez show up on your pickup basketball team. Duff is on a roll. Last week he managed a team of 12 that picked up a potful of medals - four gold, 11 silver and seven bronze - at the U.S. Army's Culinary Arts Competition at Fort Lee, Va. They finished fifth in a field of 12 teams.
NEWS
July 31, 1993
The Bosnian warring factions reached a preliminary agreement in GENEVA to divide Bosnia into three ethnic republics as part of an overall peace settlement. In SARAJEVO, the tree military commanders agreed to an immediate cease-fire.As the various leaders were meeting, shelling erupted in SARAJEVO. Gunners also blasted the area around Zuc, a strategic hill overlooking the city. Sarajevo radio said fighting continued around BRCKO, GORAZDE and MAGLAJ.One Spanish soldier was killed and 17 wounded when their barracks in JABLANICA came u;nder fire.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
As a retired veteran, I was saddened to read of the helicopter crash in Afghanistan that killed more than two dozen U.S. special forces troops Saturday. The Taliban claim responsibility for the catastrophe, but the U.S. and United Nations must share part of the blame for allowing Afghan warlords and drug dealers to operate freely in the area, in many cases financed by U.S. aid dollars. Our own government is assisting our adversaries, which makes no sense at all. President Obama and his military commanders need to explain just what our military is accomplishing in Afghanistan and why we continue to give that country large amounts of U.S foreign aid. This is no way to fight a war. Quinton D. Thompson, Towson
NEWS
November 9, 2007
The federal contracting process can be a maze of high walls not easily scaled by small and minority businesses. That demands two things of state and local officials as they prepare for the expansion of military bases in Maryland: They must help contractors navigate the system and urge military commanders to include small businesses in the related work. The problems small businesses face in securing federal contracts have been known for some time, and Congress is moving to remove some of the obstacles.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 27, 1997
ISTANBUL, Turkey -- The government of Prime Minister Necmettin Erbakan, modern Turkey's first leader from an Islamic party, was shaken yesterday by the resignation of two Cabinet ministers, which, along with a series of other defections, suggested that the government could fall within days.The two ministers who announced their resignations said they were angered by Erbakan's reluctance to reverse some of his Islamist policies as he had agreed to do in February under pressure from Turkey's military.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
The last time the military consolidated, Maryland's installations grew. But the base realignment and closure process usually goes the other way - and now the Army is calling for another round. Officials in the state aren't waiting to see what happens. They're already preparing. It's not certain yet, but the potential for a new round of BRAC in the coming years was the main topic last week for the Maryland Military Installation Council, which brings dozens of military, state, local and business leaders together for regular meetings.
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