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By Richard H. P. Sia and Lyle Denniston and Richard H. P. Sia and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | December 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon closed a year of controversy over gays in the military yesterday by issuing a new policy that gives commanders broad discretion to oust or investigate homosexuals in their units.Under the controversial "don't ask, don't tell, don't pursue" policy, which was first announced by President Clinton last July, the only gay men or lesbians who will be allowed to remain in the service are those who can prove they do not engage in homosexual sex and will not.The policy will take effect Feb. 5, replacing a sweeping, 50-year-old ban on gays in the military and a year-old interim policy that was intended to ease that ban."
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
- The commander of the Army Military District of Washington has approved the findings of the court-martial last year of WikiLeaker Chelsea Manning. Manning, who served as an intelligence analyst for the Army in Baghdad in 2009 and 2010 as Pfc. Bradley Manning, was accused of giving hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. She was tried last year at Fort Meade, found guilty of 20 offenses and sentenced to 35 years in a military prison. Maj. Gen. Jeffrey S. Buchanan approved the findings and the sentence last week, officials said Monday.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Defense Department has issued a memorandum to a group of former military commanders and civilian analysts that offers a direct challenge to the criticisms made by retired generals about Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld. The one-page memorandum was sent by e-mail Friday to the group, which includes several retired generals who appear regularly on television, and came as the Bush administration stepped up its defense of Rumsfeld. On the political front, Republican strategists voiced rising anxiety yesterday that without a major change in the course of the Iraq war, Republican candidates would suffer in the November elections.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Congress was poised late Thursday to pass new legal protections for victims of sexual assault in the military, but victims and their advocates already were looking ahead to a larger battle: the contentious campaign to overhaul the military justice system. That debate, which is expected to resume when lawmakers return to Washington in January, comes amid rising concern over rape in the ranks. The Pentagon estimates that 26,000 service members, both male and female, were subjected to unwanted sexual contact last year.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Mark Matthews and Bill Glauber and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 24, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- NATO ordered its military commanders last night to begin airstrikes against Yugoslavia after President Slobodan Milosevic sent an American envoy away without a deal to end this country's explosive civil war.The order left it up to the military leadership when to begin an air war, although no attack was expected until today at the earliest."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 2, 1998
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- With U.S. officials warning that Indonesia is on the verge of economic and social collapse, a Clinton administration delegation led by Defense Secretary William S. Cohen called on Indonesia's new president and military commanders yesterday to end human rights abuses and show restraint if government opponents take to the streets again.Cohen is the highest-ranking U.S. official to visit Indonesia since President Suharto was forced to resign in May after 32 years in power.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 2, 1997
ANKARA, Turkey -- Angered by what it views as efforts to impose a form of religious fundamentalism in Turkey, the military command here has issued a sharp reprimand to the Islamic-led government.Tension between military commanders and the government has grown steadily in recent weeks, and it surfaced at a meeting Friday of the National Security Council, which is composed of senior military and civilian leaders.As is customary, participants in the meeting made no comments as they left, and no details of the discussion were made public.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Les Aspin's sudden departure as secretary of defense yesterday was preceded by a loss of confidence in his leadership by senior U.S. military commanders, an unwillingness on his part to make deeper cuts in Pentagon spending and a fateful decision that may have cost American lives in Somalia.Shortly after President Clinton announced he was accepting Mr. Aspin's resignation, one veteran defense official who knew Mr. Aspin well sought to sum up his brief Pentagon stint."Les was just in over his head," the official said.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 31, 2003
ANKARA, Turkey - The Turkish parliament took another step in this country's quest to join the European Union by giving overwhelming approval yesterday to landmark reforms designed to significantly curtail the political power of the military. On paper, at least, this represents a remarkable move in a country whose very existence is defined by the army. The modern Turkish republic was forged by military commanders from the ruins of the Ottoman Empire, and the army has steered most major political developments since.
NEWS
March 6, 1991
Whether deficient Soviet arms were a main cause of the Iraqi defeat or not, the reaction of the Kremlin's medal-bedecked generals has been swift.Impressed by the coalition forces' air power and precision weapons, Soviet Defense Minister Dmitri Yazov has ordered a snap review of the Soviet air force and air-defense system. "The echo of missile thunder in the desert must put us on our guard," explained Col. Gen. Rakhim S. Akchurin, commander of Soviet anti-aircraft forces.Some voices in the Soviet high command argue that "the outcome of any war is determined not so much by equipment as by the people who use it."
NEWS
June 5, 2013
The military's top uniformed leaders did themselves no favors in their testimony Tuesday before the Senate Armed Services Committee about sexual assaults in the military. Certainly, they were willing to give the problem lip service, but in refusing to back the substantial reforms many in the Senate have in mind, they demonstrated that they still take the problem lightly. How is that even possible? In case they missed it, the number of assaults taking place under their command has risen sharply - from about 19,000 in 2010 to about 26,000 last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | March 17, 2010
I f it is true, as Napoleon said, that an army moves on its stomach, then some Army reservists at Fort Meade will soon be soldiering in style. Sgt. 1st Class James Duff, a food service specialist with the 200th Military Police Command, will be reporting for duty at Fort Meade this month. This is the mess-hall equivalent, I gather, of having Maryland sharpshooter Greivis Vasquez show up on your pickup basketball team. Duff is on a roll. Last week he managed a team of 12 that picked up a potful of medals - four gold, 11 silver and seven bronze - at the U.S. Army's Culinary Arts Competition at Fort Lee, Va. They finished fifth in a field of 12 teams.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | November 22, 2007
George W. Bush has accepted that he won't live long enough to witness his legacy, though he still hopes to capture Osama bin Laden before leaving office in just over a year. These were among his thoughts during an in-flight interview Monday after an address in Virginia. Mr. Bush frequently gazed out the window as he reflected on his years in office, the war and this season of gratitude. For his part, the president said he's grateful for men and women who volunteer to fight the war against radicals and extremists and help others "realize the blessings of liberty."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 5, 2007
SANGIN, Afghanistan -- The British army compound in a drug lord's former villa, with its sandbagged windows and lookout posts and shrapnel-scarred walls, is a reminder that until just a few weeks ago, Sangin was among the most dangerous towns in Afghanistan's most dangerous province, Helmand. Since their arrival last spring in this lawless region of mountains and desert, British troops have lost 64 men in almost daily combat against a Taliban force second to none in size and ferocity in the country.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,Los Angeles Times | July 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A passionate congressional debate over the war in Iraq ended abruptly this week in legislative deadlock, leaving President Bush free to continue his military buildup into September. But inside the Bush administration, a less visible but no less passionate debate is under way - over whether the "surge" should continue even longer. Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, the overall commander in Iraq, is expected to present Bush with several options in a key report in September, along with an analysis of where each path might lead.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | July 3, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- For anyone trying to make sense of the white-hot American political debate over Iraq policy, let me offer a few tips from a recent trip to Baghdad. Much of the debate is a reaction to Pollyanna-ish claims by the White House that we will achieve stability and democracy in Baghdad. It's past time for the White House to level with the public. Yet, far away from the Washington blah-blah, U.S. military forces in Iraq are pursuing far more pragmatic goals that the public needs to be aware of. So here's a reality check, based on interviews with U.S. and Iraqi officials in Baghdad.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,Los Angeles Times | July 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A passionate congressional debate over the war in Iraq ended abruptly this week in legislative deadlock, leaving President Bush free to continue his military buildup into September. But inside the Bush administration, a less visible but no less passionate debate is under way - over whether the "surge" should continue even longer. Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, the overall commander in Iraq, is expected to present Bush with several options in a key report in September, along with an analysis of where each path might lead.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Despite the administration's attempts to blame the United Nations for the Somalia crisis, the intensifying military operations there were repeatedly endorsed and sometimes driven by top U.S. officials in the months before the disastrous Army raid on a hostile faction two weeks ago.Last Thursday, 11 days after 18 U.S. soldiers died in the raid, President Clinton sought to shift responsibility to the United Nations, which took over the Somalian...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 12, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Four years after the fall of Baghdad, the White House is again struggling to solve an old problem: Who is in charge of carrying out policy in Iraq? Once again President Bush and his top aides are searching for a high-level coordinator capable of cutting through military, political and reconstruction strategies that have never operated in sync, in Washington or in Baghdad. Once again Bush is publicly declaring that his administration has settled on a strategy for victory - this time, a troop increase that is supposed to open political space for Sunnis and Shiites to live and govern together - even while his top aides acknowledge that the White House has never gotten the execution right.
NEWS
By Kim Barker and Kim Barker,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 17, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- In his first visit to Afghanistan, U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said terrorist attacks from across the border in Pakistan had significantly increased, fueling a growing rift between the two countries and concern that the Taliban has set up shop in the lawless border areas of Pakistan. But Gates added that Pakistan was one of the strongest allies of the U.S. in the war on terrorism. He also said that if U.S. military commanders asked for more U.S. troops here, he would be strongly inclined to recommend an increase to the president.
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