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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - Most of Iraq's neighbors seem prepared to support a U.S. military campaign to remove Saddam Hussein from power, but that backing is not assured and rests on several political and military factors. To avoid an angry response from their respective publics, Arab leaders are putting conditions on the nature of any military action. They say it must be perceived as a means to enforce the United Nations' demands that Iraq disarm, not as a unilateral American attempt to redraw the political map in the Middle East.
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NEWS
December 16, 2010
The Baltimore Sun's editorial, "The longest war" (Dec. 16), provides a thoughtful analysis of the U.S. and allied involvement in Afghanistan and comes to the conclusion the war as it is being waged now is a losing proposition. What would constitute "victory" in this endless war? Without going into the intricacies of this misguided policy, The Sun suggests shifting the military campaign to drone attacks and special forces raids, even though this would mean a continuation of pointless killing, albeit from a different perspective, with its utter waste of tax dollars and young lives.
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NEWS
December 16, 2010
The Baltimore Sun's editorial, "The longest war" (Dec. 16), provides a thoughtful analysis of the U.S. and allied involvement in Afghanistan and comes to the conclusion the war as it is being waged now is a losing proposition. What would constitute "victory" in this endless war? Without going into the intricacies of this misguided policy, The Sun suggests shifting the military campaign to drone attacks and special forces raids, even though this would mean a continuation of pointless killing, albeit from a different perspective, with its utter waste of tax dollars and young lives.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 13, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- A Kurdish villager mocked Saddam Hussein in court yesterday as the man recalled the disappearance of his relatives during his former regime's 1980s military campaign in northern Iraq. "Congratulations! You are in a cage," said the witness, Ghafour Hassan Abdullah, addressing Hussein and his six co-defendants, who were seated inside a metal grating placed in the courtroom. Hussein's patience failed as a defense lawyer described Iraqi Kurdish rebels as freedom fighters.
NEWS
October 27, 2001
HATED as the Taliban are by many Afghans, the ruling group enjoys a powerful asset: the disunity of all others. The United States must be ready to help install an interim regime acceptable to most Afghans the moment the Taliban falls. Holding the broad base together as an alternative is an incredible problem. Holding coalition countries together in support of it will be harder. Most rulers of Afghanistan have come from the dominant Pashtun people, who live on both sides of the border with Pakistan.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 13, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- A Kurdish villager mocked Saddam Hussein in court yesterday as the man recalled the disappearance of his relatives during his former regime's 1980s military campaign in northern Iraq. "Congratulations! You are in a cage," said the witness, Ghafour Hassan Abdullah, addressing Hussein and his six co-defendants, who were seated inside a metal grating placed in the courtroom. Hussein's patience failed as a defense lawyer described Iraqi Kurdish rebels as freedom fighters.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - More U.S. commandos will be sent into Afghanistan to assist anti-Taliban forces and call in American airstrikes, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday, but he conceded that weather and hostile fire have been impediments to putting additional troops on the ground. "We're going to be adding people," Rumsfeld told reporters at the Pentagon. "I'd like to see as soon as humanly possible the numbers of teams go up by three or four times." Rumsfeld said that the harsh weather in northern Afghanistan, the lack of the right equipment and landing zones, as well as hostile fire, have prevented more commandos from heading into the northern part of the country.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Marego Athans and Tom Bowman and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 9, 2001
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Army general who is commanding the military campaign in Afghanistan said yesterday that the monthlong action is proceeding according to plan, brushing aside critics who say that the bombing has been too light and that a decisive victory is needed before winter. "We like the progress we have made up to this point," said Gen. Tommy R. Franks, commander in chief of all U.S. forces in the Middle East and Central Asia, appearing at a Pentagon news conference with Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 3, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The White House raised the prospect for the first time yesterday that NATO's air strikes will fail to achieve President Clinton's objective of bringing hundreds of thousands of Kosovar Albanians back to their homes and restoring Kosovo to a protected and autonomous land.Even as the military campaign surged into the center of Belgrade last night, the White House -- from Clinton to national security officials -- seemed to be preparing the public in case they have to jettison the chief political aim of their military campaign against Yugoslavia: returning Kosovo to its ethnic Albanian majority.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon | April 28, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Was Osama bin Laden in the mountains of Tora Bora in the first half of December? And did the U.S. decision to rely on Afghan militias and Pakistani troops, rather than American forces, to seal off escape routes from those mountains permit bin Laden to escape during the intensive bombing campaign of that month? If so, that decision surely ranks as the greatest mistake in an otherwise brilliant U.S.-led military campaign. Well aware of the stakes involved, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld has studiously denied any second thoughts about U.S. tactics during the Tora Bora campaign.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 19, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Efforts by United Nations envoys to arrange a Middle East cease-fire made little progress yesterday, as Israel bombed new targets in Lebanon, Hezbollah fired more than 100 short-range rockets into northern Israel and the civilian death toll continued to climb. Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert informed a special U.N. delegation here that Israel would continue its military campaign against the Shiite militant group Hezbollah until two abducted soldiers are released, and until the security of residents of northern Israel is assured.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - Most of Iraq's neighbors seem prepared to support a U.S. military campaign to remove Saddam Hussein from power, but that backing is not assured and rests on several political and military factors. To avoid an angry response from their respective publics, Arab leaders are putting conditions on the nature of any military action. They say it must be perceived as a means to enforce the United Nations' demands that Iraq disarm, not as a unilateral American attempt to redraw the political map in the Middle East.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Saddam Hussein of Iraq will try to compensate for his armed forces' glaring weaknesses by raising the specter of urban warfare if the Bush administration moves to attack the Iraqi government, according to Pentagon officials and former U.S. government experts. In anticipation of an eventual American attack, Iraq has already started military preparations, they say. Iraqi forces have been digging defensive positions for military equipment around Baghdad. The Iraqi military has also been moving air defense units around the country and dispersing army units in the field to make them less vulnerable to a surprise air attack.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon | April 28, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Was Osama bin Laden in the mountains of Tora Bora in the first half of December? And did the U.S. decision to rely on Afghan militias and Pakistani troops, rather than American forces, to seal off escape routes from those mountains permit bin Laden to escape during the intensive bombing campaign of that month? If so, that decision surely ranks as the greatest mistake in an otherwise brilliant U.S.-led military campaign. Well aware of the stakes involved, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld has studiously denied any second thoughts about U.S. tactics during the Tora Bora campaign.
NEWS
March 2, 2002
WHEN ISRAELI soldiers, tanks and helicopter gunships stormed two Palestinian refugee camps the other night, there was but one conclusion to draw: Prime Minister Ariel Sharon is intent on fighting his way out of the 17-month conflict. Israel has said it launched the assaults and house-to-house searches to rout Palestinian militants and their cache of bomb-making tools from the camps. The Balata camp, on the outskirts of Nablus, has a long and violent history of resisting Israel's presence in the West Bank.
NEWS
By Robin Wright and Robin Wright,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - The warnings have been issued, the gauntlet thrown down. Now, after a year of internal divisions and military diversions, the serious planning is under way within the Bush administration for a campaign against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. The administration expects to complete a long-delayed Iraq policy review by the time Vice President Dick Cheney makes his nine-nation Middle East tour next month, so that he can outline U.S. plans to Arab leaders, according to senior U.S. officials.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Saddam Hussein of Iraq will try to compensate for his armed forces' glaring weaknesses by raising the specter of urban warfare if the Bush administration moves to attack the Iraqi government, according to Pentagon officials and former U.S. government experts. In anticipation of an eventual American attack, Iraq has already started military preparations, they say. Iraqi forces have been digging defensive positions for military equipment around Baghdad. The Iraqi military has also been moving air defense units around the country and dispersing army units in the field to make them less vulnerable to a surprise air attack.
NEWS
By Robin Wright and Robin Wright,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - The warnings have been issued, the gauntlet thrown down. Now, after a year of internal divisions and military diversions, the serious planning is under way within the Bush administration for a campaign against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. The administration expects to complete a long-delayed Iraq policy review by the time Vice President Dick Cheney makes his nine-nation Middle East tour next month, so that he can outline U.S. plans to Arab leaders, according to senior U.S. officials.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Marego Athans and Tom Bowman and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 9, 2001
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Army general who is commanding the military campaign in Afghanistan said yesterday that the monthlong action is proceeding according to plan, brushing aside critics who say that the bombing has been too light and that a decisive victory is needed before winter. "We like the progress we have made up to this point," said Gen. Tommy R. Franks, commander in chief of all U.S. forces in the Middle East and Central Asia, appearing at a Pentagon news conference with Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - More U.S. commandos will be sent into Afghanistan to assist anti-Taliban forces and call in American airstrikes, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday, but he conceded that weather and hostile fire have been impediments to putting additional troops on the ground. "We're going to be adding people," Rumsfeld told reporters at the Pentagon. "I'd like to see as soon as humanly possible the numbers of teams go up by three or four times." Rumsfeld said that the harsh weather in northern Afghanistan, the lack of the right equipment and landing zones, as well as hostile fire, have prevented more commandos from heading into the northern part of the country.
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