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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
Midshipmen at the Naval Academy could spend less time training at sea, some gates into Fort Meade could be shut down and routine maintenance at military installations across the state could be delayed under federal budget cuts set to begin Friday. Military bases in Maryland stand to lose $114 million in operational funding as part of the across-the-board spending cuts known as sequestration. That is on top of the $359 million the Pentagon expects to save by furloughing 46,000 of its civilian workers in the state.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 3, 2013
Sam's Club is waiving membership requirements for military personnel and retirees and their families during the government shutdown. The retailer said Thursday it decided to waive the fees after dozens of commissaries on military bases were closed by the shutdown. "Military personnel, retirees and their families heavily depend on commissaries for low-cost groceries and everyday needs," Sam's Club's announcement said.  The retailer said it planned to waive the fees at Sam's Club locations near military bases until the government re-opens the commissaries.
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NEWS
July 15, 1991
When it comes to tough decisions on Capitol Hill these days, the trick is to save Congress from itself. That's why trade agreements, under presidential "fast-track" authority, are voted up or down in their entirety. To open them to amendment would expose individual legislators to irresistible pressures from special-interest groups. That's why, in the far touchier business of closing military bases, the same all-or-nothing approach is being used for the most sweeping defense retrenchment in decades.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has ordered the Maryland flag to be flown at half staff in memory of the victims of “the senseless acts of violence” at the Boston Marathon on Monday. The announcement follows a proclamation Tuesday from President Barack Obama, who ordered the U.S. flag flown at half-staff at federal buildings, military bases and embassies throughout the world “as a mark of respect” for the victims. The flags are to remain at half staff each day until sunset on Saturday.
NEWS
April 6, 1993
Congress needs to be saved from itself if ever the nation is to reduce its surfeit of military bases.Luckily the mechanism exists for doing just that: the Commission on Base Realignment and Closure. After hearing the pathetic squeals of legislators who have lost military pork in their home districts, its independent members will publish at mid-year the names of installations scheduled for closing or downsizing. Then, President Clinton and Congress will have to accept or reject the whole list.
NEWS
By Eric V. Schlecht | August 13, 2001
ALEXANDRIA, Va. - Military experts inside and outside the Pentagon agree that widespread funding problems for weapons, spares, ammunition and training plague our armed forces. Yet in an age where economic security and national security go hand in hand, taxpayers expect fiscally responsible solutions to fund these shortfalls in defense spending. The good news is that President Bush proposed just such a solution recently: form another Base Realignment and Closure commission to close obsolete military bases throughout the United States, and put the substantial cost savings to work for service people instead of special interests.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld yesterday scaled back his previous declaration that as many as 25 percent of domestic military bases could be closed or trimmed in the new round of base closings getting under way. Rumsfeld said the return of thousands of U.S. troops from abroad - and the need to house them - has caused the Pentagon to lower its estimate of unneeded military facilities. Previously, Rumsfeld and senior military leaders going back to the Clinton administration have claimed that there is a 20 percent to 25 percent excess capacity at the country's 425 military facilities, indicating that nearly 100 were vulnerable to being closed or trimmed back.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staaff, said yesterday that the United States was wasting money on unnecessary military bases and that the government must be "vicious" in closing installations.In an appearance before the commission charged with closing bases, General Powell said that consolidation was needed to make the best use of shrinking resources in post-Cold War society.General Powell said that the closings would complement changes in U.S. military strategy as the Soviet threat recedes, meshing with force and budget reductions intended to produce a leaner, more mobile military that could respond quickly to unexpected crises.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said yesterday that the United States was wasting money on unnecessary military bases and that the government must be "vicious" in closing installations.In an appearance before the commission charged with closing bases, General Powell said that consolidation was needed to make the best use of shrinking resources in post-Cold War society.He said that the closings would complement changes in U.S. military strategy as the Soviet threat recedes, meshing with force and budget reductions intended to produce a leaner, more mobile military that could respond quickly to unexpected crises.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After three rounds of closing military bases and with the biggest round still to come, more than one-third of the installations that were supposed to close have managed to stay open in some way, a new study by a business group says.The operations that survive at 26 major bases that have been ordered shut since 1988 could cost the government more than $15 billion in the next five years, according to an analysis conducted by Business Executives for National Security, a private Washington-based organization that seeks to reduce spending and eliminate waste at the Pentagon.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | March 15, 2013
Little Caesars says it's growing faster than just about any pizza chain - and eyeing Baltimore as a hot market. The chain's vice president of franchise development says the Baltimore metro area figures into a new strategy to target suburban and rural communities and to seek real estate on college campuses, military bases and within convenience stores. The carryout known for its $5 ready-to-go-pizza already has several dozen locations in Maryland, many in strip malls scattered throughout Baltimore, Anne Arundel, Howard and Harford counties.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
Midshipmen at the Naval Academy could spend less time training at sea, some gates into Fort Meade could be shut down and routine maintenance at military installations across the state could be delayed under federal budget cuts set to begin Friday. Military bases in Maryland stand to lose $114 million in operational funding as part of the across-the-board spending cuts known as sequestration. That is on top of the $359 million the Pentagon expects to save by furloughing 46,000 of its civilian workers in the state.
NEWS
December 9, 2012
It is fascinating to read of all these organizations that want to do so much for us. The American Civil Liberties Union is suing the U.S. Department of Defense to put an end to the ban on women in combat. Senators Ben Cardin and Barbara Boxer want the environment on military bases to be made safer by reducing the amount of lead to which our troops are exposed ("Lead limits on military firing ranges outdated, reports says," Dec. 4). These advocates even cited evidence that pregnant women should not be exposed to levels of lead for risk of spontaneous abortion.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
A man accused of plotting to attack the Federal Reserve in New York considered striking a lightly guarded military installation in Baltimore, according to authorities. Quazi Mohammad Reswanul Ahsan Nafis, a 21-year-old Bangladeshi national, was arrested Wednesday after authorities said he attempted to detonate what he thought was a bomb outside the Federal Reserve Bank building in lower Manhattan. Undercover officers posing as members of al-Qaida had been meeting with Nafis since July, according to an affidavit sworn by FBI Special Agent John Neas.
NEWS
September 24, 2012
After a week of President Barack Obama's typical lying fashion, his administration finally admitted that the terrorist assault on the American consulate in Benghazi and the assassination of Ambassador Chris Stevens was a preplanned operation by anti-American jihadists possibly linked to al-Qaida ("Libya assault 'terrorist act,'" Sept. 21). Presenting it as a random attack linked to the recent Islamic riots would absolve his administration of the guilt of failing to prevent what happened.
NEWS
August 8, 2012
As Americans are being lulled into believing our wars are winding down, I was appalled to read Robert Koehler's recent commentary about U.S. power in the world ("Can an empire show compassion?" Aug. 5). Do I want to live in a hyper-militarized American empire? Absolutely not. There is nothing in our Constitution to mandate we dominate the planet, and if history is any guide, such a philosophical change spells disaster. It's despicable that we have more than 1,000 military bases worldwide and simultaneously have created a form of armed intervention based on presidential whim.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2011
Maryland plays a Florida State team Wednesday night that is top-ranked in the nation in defense and features a 26-year-old shot blocker who never played in high school or the Amateur Athletic Union but honed his game on military bases in the Middle East, where the temperature climbed above 115 degrees. The Seminoles (19-7, 9-3 Atlantic Coast Conference) build themselves around size and length - attributes that are an integral part of the coaching staff's plan of complicating life for opposing scorers.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 3, 2013
Sam's Club is waiving membership requirements for military personnel and retirees and their families during the government shutdown. The retailer said Thursday it decided to waive the fees after dozens of commissaries on military bases were closed by the shutdown. "Military personnel, retirees and their families heavily depend on commissaries for low-cost groceries and everyday needs," Sam's Club's announcement said.  The retailer said it planned to waive the fees at Sam's Club locations near military bases until the government re-opens the commissaries.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
The restaurants around Fort Monmouth in New Jersey used to be packed. Now that lunchtime crowd gathers 150 miles to the southwest, in Aberdeen. Javier Rodriguez, who just relocated to Aberdeen Proving Ground last month, was struck by the familiar feeling the mass migration has created in his still-unfamiliar new home. "I went out to lunch with a couple of my co-workers … and it was exactly how I remembered it when I first started at Fort Monmouth," said Rodriguez, 33. The national reshuffling of military bases that has brought thousands of jobs to Maryland hits a key milestone this week: It's officially done.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | June 21, 2011
Harford County has a civilian labor force of approximately 130,736 people out of a population of about 250,000. The private sector accounts for the largest share of jobs held by county residents, 66,000 in all. This includes about 19,000 who work in trade, transportation and utilities; 11,000 working in professional business services, and 9,000 work in educational and health services, according to statistics compiled by the county government....
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