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By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1997
If professional boxing is too staid, if soap operas aren't melodramatic enough, there's always the issue of military aircraft in Congress to put a little spice in life.Dial it up over the next several days and see which expensive program is currently getting nuzzles and nibbles and which is leaving cartilage on the canvas.The stakes are high, with hundreds of millions of dollars and tens of thousands of defense contractor jobs riding on the preferences of politicians. Programs that are out of favor one year can suddenly rise again, as the B-2 bomber appears to be doing with unexpected support from the House.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 13, 2009
In 1930, a young man walked into a new Middle River aircraft plant carrying a letter stating that he was a seasoned plane builder. Joe Grant, now 101, returned to that spot Thursday and confessed: "I don't think it took them long to realize I wasn't what I said I was," he said. Grant might have exaggerated his credentials when he presented himself as an expert in metal plane construction, but that hardly mattered Thursday at a ceremony honoring his aviation career and the years he spent at the old Glenn L. Martin Co., where he worked constructing early commercial and military aircraft.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | December 10, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- The post-Cold War consolidation of th American weapons industry continued yesterday with the announcement that the Lockheed Corp. would acquire General Dynamics Corp.'s military aircraft division for $1.53 billion in cash.The transaction puts Lockheed, based in Calabasas, Calif., neck and neck with the nation's largest military aircraft maker, McDonnell Douglas Corp. It also further reduces the number of military contractors available to supply the Pentagon, concentrating a major jet fighter contract at one company.
NEWS
January 19, 2006
Bombing Pakistan sullies our nation Is there to be no end to the shame brought upon our country by the misdirected activities of the present administration? Will it never learn anything from its repeated mistakes, no matter how large the resulting disasters that descend upon our country and the world? The latest example is an air strike by the United States on a village in Pakistan, which has apparently resulted in the deaths of at least 18 innocent civilians, with no benefit to the United States ("Outcry over U.S. strike in Pakistan," Jan. 15)
NEWS
March 1, 1994
Retired Air Force Lt. Gen. Laurence C. "Bill" Craigie, 92, America's first military jet pilot and an air command veteran of World War II and the Korean War, died yesterday at March Air Force Base hospital in Riverside, Calif. General Craigie, who was involved in developing many types of military aircraft in the 1930s and '40s, was one of the first two pilots to fly the Bell XP-59A Airacomet, developed in secrecy as the first U.S. jet airplane.@
NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Boeing Co. announced a $13.3 billion deal yesterday to buy McDonnell Douglas Corp., a purchase that will create the world's largest aerospace company and cast a shadow over Bethesda's Lockheed Martin Corp. in the battle for Pentagon business.If approved by federal antitrust regulators, the jumbo company will carry the Boeing name, expect sales of $48 billion next year and employ more than 200,000 in 27 states. Lockheed Martin, with similar employment, posts annual sales of about $30 billion.
NEWS
April 9, 1997
Gino Santi,81, who led the design and development of the first U.S. ejection seat for military aircraft, died of cancer Thursday in Dayton, Ohio.Mr. Santi served in the Army Air Forces during World War II and later became project engineer on the team that developed the ejection seat in 1949. He also is credited with inventing a prototype for air bags used in automobiles and an automatic-opening lap belt used in military aircraft.Travis Bogard,79, one of the foremost experts on the life and works of playwright Eugene O'Neill, died Saturday in Berkeley, Calif.
NEWS
June 18, 1991
Respondents to an informal telephone survey are almost evenly split on the issue of whether women should be restricted from combat duty. There is a similar feeling about whether women should be allowed to fight in the infantry or fly military aircraft in combat.Of 329 callers to SUNDIAL, The Evening Sun's telephone poll, 171 (51 percent) think that women should be restricted from combat duty, and 158 (48 percent) think that women should not be restricted from combat duty.Of 328 callers, 162 (49 percent)
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | April 11, 1991
The Grumman Corp. aircraft parts plant in Baltimore County today laid off 19 of its 200 workers as part of a corporate-wide effort to reduce the work force by 1,900 employees by the end of the year."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | April 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Top Bush administration officials took dozens of personal or political trips aboard military aircraft that cost the taxpayers three-quarters of a million dollars, but the government was repaid only $61,585, the General Accounting Office reported yesterday.Meantime, another independent audit released yesterday found more private trips for which former Chief of Staff John H. Sununu used government vehicles without paying for them at all.According to the GAO report, Cabinet-level members of the administration took 35 trips that were purely political or personal in nature.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2003
Unmanned planes have proved their worth in wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and now those who build them are thinking beyond the battlefields to a day when pilotless drones may fly in the nation's civilian airspace. Defense industry and government officials taking part in a symposium on robotic technology and unmanned flight met at the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday to begin an effort to bring that day closer. They hope to develop uniform standards and regulations for unmanned aircraft, with the goal of convincing the Federal Aviation Administration that the planes can fly safely alongside commercial helicopters and passenger jets.
NEWS
By Sun staff writer Tom Bowman | February 14, 2003
Countries that have offered or are considering assistance to a U.S.-led coalition. Britain: Has deployed 42,000 troops to the gulf region. Contingent also includes Royal Marines, 100 fixed-wing aircraft and 27 helicopters. Australia: Has deployed about 2,000 military personnel, including special forces, and F-18 attack aircraft, cargo planes and helicopters. Denmark: Offered to send the submarine Saelen and special forces if the Security Council supports military action. Italy: Opened airspace and bases to U.S. military.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,Sun Staff | January 23, 2000
The 400 executives and reporters dining on filet mignon in a ballroom at the Capital Hilton showed no outward signs of duress. There was no despair in the keynote speech, either, at last month's year-in-review luncheon of the Aerospace Industries Association. But appearances can deceive. Many aerospace and defense contractors were not pleased with 1999. "Last year was the most disappointing year for the defense industry in a decade, in terms of stock performance and general industry outlook," said Loren Thompson, an expert with the Lexington Institute think tank in Arlington, Va. The year was marked by failures in space shots, setbacks in military aircraft programs and near-disaster on Wall Street for some of the nation's most powerful companies.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1999
A battery-production facility in Cockeysville is getting a $20 million upgrade along with the potential for a number of new jobs.Saft America Inc. -- a division of the French firm Saft SA -- makes nickel-hydrogen batteries for military aircraft and satellites. The upgrade will allow the company to expand research, development and limited production of batteries using lithium ions, more powerful, lighter and considered a safer and less flamable material.Lisa Bull, contracts administrator for the Cockeysville facility, said the expansion will bring more jobs but added that it was too early to estimate how many.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
Lockheed Martin Corp., which is struggling to regain Wall Street's confidence, may seek to shed its military aircraft electronics business as part of a plan to sell at least $1 billion in assets.The Bethesda aerospace giant would neither confirm nor deny published reports about the sell-off, saying only that executives were expected to make a proposal to the company's board yesterday.Jim Fetig, a Lockheed spokesman, acknowledged yesterday's scheduled board meeting, and noted that the company is conducting a review of its "operational performance, organizational effectiveness and strategic alignment."
NEWS
By Michele Nevard and Michele Nevard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 1999
LONDON -- This is no time to be flying in a civilian airplane in European airspace. It's crowded with NATO missiles and bombers."All airspace and airports in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Croatia, Bosnia and Albania have been off-limits to all but the military," said Tim Goodyear of the International Air Travel Association. "A further 40 nautical miles surrounding the area is closed.""Rerouting is affecting flights to Greece, Turkey, northeast Africa, Egypt and the Middle East," he said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | October 29, 1996
ST. LOUIS -- McDonnell Douglas Corp. said yesterday that it has dropped plans for a new jumbo jetliner, all but conceding the niche to Boeing Co., to concentrate on making military aircraft and smaller passenger planes.The company said it won't press ahead with the MD-XX, a 300- to-375-seat passenger plane, just one month after unveiling ambitious plans for the airliner. Boeing has 70 percent of the jetliner market and is the only jumbo jet maker.Abandoning the big plane leaves McDonnell Douglas even more dependent on its military and space businesses, which account for three-quarters of its revenue.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Bowing at least slightly to public pressure over his extensive travel on military airplanes, White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu has asked White House Counsel C. Boyden Gray to review all his travel records to determine whether his accounting of them was "accurate and appropriate," officials disclosed yesterday.Until now, the White House had insisted that Mr. Gray would review future travel policy but would not delve into questions surrounding Mr. Sununu's past travels.
NEWS
By Dr. Brant Mittler | December 13, 1998
LOS ANGELES - Under California jurisprudence, the burden of guilt apparently stretches longer than the Pacific Coast Highway.How else can you interpret a Los Angeles judge's recent comments encouraging a jury to force five chemical companies to pay $785 million in damages to defense workers who worked with their products at a top-secret defense facility in Burbank, Calif.?The workers claimed they were unknowingly exposed to the chemicals because their employer, Lockheed Co., removed the warning labels from the chemicals' containers.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1997
If professional boxing is too staid, if soap operas aren't melodramatic enough, there's always the issue of military aircraft in Congress to put a little spice in life.Dial it up over the next several days and see which expensive program is currently getting nuzzles and nibbles and which is leaving cartilage on the canvas.The stakes are high, with hundreds of millions of dollars and tens of thousands of defense contractor jobs riding on the preferences of politicians. Programs that are out of favor one year can suddenly rise again, as the B-2 bomber appears to be doing with unexpected support from the House.
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