Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMilitary Action
IN THE NEWS

Military Action

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Sudarsan Raghavan | March 19, 2011
— The United States and its allies prepared Friday to launch military attacks on Libya as forces led by Moammar Gadhafi continued to bombard rebel-held towns despite government promises of a cease-fire. President Barack Obama warned that Gadhafi faced imminent military action unless his troops were withdrawn from all disputed cities in the country. But the besieged town of Misurata, 120 miles east of Tripoli, was still coming under heavy artillery fire, residents said, and there were also reports of continued fighting around Ajdabiyah in the far east of the country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 12, 2014
It's ironic that tea party Republicans want no part of a debate or vote on President Barack Obama's proposal to act against ISIS when in the past they've complained bitterly about Mr. Obama acting alone without consulting Congress ( "Congress expected to avoid vote on military action in Iraq, Syria," Sept. 9). In such a crisis the nation obviously is stronger and our efforts more effective when the Congress and the president work together. The tea party will criticize the president no matter what decision he makes, but they want no part in having their votes recorded.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent Diana Jean Schemo of The Sun's Paris Bureau contributed to this article | November 19, 1990
PARIS -- President Bush, arriving here last night for a 34-nation European summit, immediately went to work lining up support for a possible military strike against Iraq unless it withdraws from Kuwait.At a private dinner with French President Francois Mitterrand, Mr. Bush was expected to secure his commitment to back a resolution authorizing the use of force that the United States hopes to have approved by the United Nations Security Council of this month.France is one the five permanent members of the Security Council that have veto power, and Mr. Mitterrand has been one two holdouts on military force -- with Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 29, 2014
President Obama, in his determination to get American foreign policy off what he has called "a perpetual war footing," must take care now not to box himself in with any more comments about "red lines" that restrict his options. As he appraises the growing threats to U.S. security from the Islamic State, the jihadist group that has taken over much of Syria and Iraq, he must make clear his continuing prerogative to take military action in legitimate self-defense. That remains so despite his repeated statements, made as if to ease fears at home and abroad, that there is "no military solution" to the crises in Iraq andUkraine.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | April 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Far removed from the White House Situation Room and the Cabinet councils of London and Paris, cries of outrage and small but significant acts of rebellion and courage are propelling the West toward military action in the Balkans.In the State Department, a dozen working-level desk officers who read the daily cables from Bosnia vented more than a year of frustration in a letter to Secretary of State Warren Christopher. They described as a failure U.S. policy to end the bloodshed in the former Yugoslavia and urged the use of force.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | December 11, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon stands increasingly isolated i opposing military intervention in the former Yugoslavia as the prospect of a winter disaster mounts and unenforced United Nations resolutions steadily lose credibility with Serbia.The U.S.-led military humanitarian mission in Somalia has failed to halt pressure among allies and within the U.S. government for stepped-up military action in the Balkans. In fact, the pressure has increased as Serbian forces come closer to taking over Sarajevo and threats of a region-wide conflict mount in Kosovo and Macedonia.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Members of Congress plan to go to court today to try to stop further use of U.S. military forces in the war against Yugoslavia.In the lawsuit, which was being drafted late yesterday by lawyers for Rep. Tom Campbell, a California Republican, 10 or more lawmakers will ask a U.S. district judge in Washington to force President Clinton to end military action in the Balkans until he gets approval from Congress.Past attempts to persuade the courts to second-guess a president's use of military force have not fared well.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 27, 1990
WASHINGTON -- President Bush hinted broadly to a federal judge last night that he may ask Congress to give specific approval before any U.S. military attack on Iraq.Speaking through Justice Department lawyers, Mr. Bush told U.S. District Judge Harold H. Greene, "At no time has the administration stated that it will not seek congressional authorization for any particular action it takes."The president's lawyers conceded that up to now there has been only a promise that Congress would be "consulted" and no suggestion that it would be asked to approve military combat in advance.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 2002
MOSCOW - The leaders of Russia, China and France agreed yesterday to listen to President Bush's case against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, but all remained steadfastly opposed to military action. During back-to-back telephone calls yesterday, Bush stressed to his counterparts "that Saddam Hussein was a threat, and that we need to work together to make the world peaceful," said White House spokesman Ari Fleischer. Bush also asked the leaders to receive high-level U.S. officials to outline the administration's position against Iraq.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 4, 1990
SHANNON, Ireland -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III embarked yesterday on a tour of the Middle East, the Soviet Union and Western Europe to sound out sentiment for military action and other steps to force Iraq out of Kuwait.Mr. Baker, who plans to visit seven countries over eight days, said he would talk to foreign leaders about new political, economic and military measures that the anti-Iraq coalition of nations could take to intensify pressure on Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to withdraw his troops from Kuwait.
NEWS
By Sarah E. Croco and Scott Sigmund Gartner | July 1, 2014
How far can President Barack Obama involve the U.S. in Iraq without taking ownership of a war he opposed and supposedly ended? Iraq finds itself once again on the precipice of civil war, presenting Mr. Obama with a difficult choice: Is the U.S. back in or staying out? In recent weeks, he has appeared as though he is trying to walk a fine line between the two. He earlier announced he was sending 300 military advisers to Iraq (Secretary of State John Kerry has also visited Baghdad), but he cautioned that the U.S. would only take military action "if the situation on the ground requires it. " Since then, several hundred troops have been sent to Baghdad to help protect the American embassy there and help with security and logistics, according to the New York Times, bringing the number of U.S. troops deployed to Iraq to 750. The decision over what to do is especially tough for Mr. Obama, given his history on the war. Candidate Obama made political hay on his anti-Iraq position in the 2008 primaries against Hillary Clinton, who could not escape her earlier vote for the war despite her subsequent reversal.
NEWS
June 20, 2014
While there may be hard choices in Iraq, military intervention in that nation is not warranted considering the role that Iran has played in supporting the government of Prime Minister Nouri Kamal al-Maliki ( "Hard choice in Iraq," June 16). Certainly, the international community including the U.S. has made tragic mistakes in the ongoing conflict in the Middle East, but only minimal diplomatic intervention for the time being should be considered. The obvious solution at the present is to withdraw from the now escalating war between Shiites and Sunnis, particularly in light of the more radical elements gaining control.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 2, 2014
Why President Obama was off in the Asian Pacific while Russia was stirring up trouble in eastern Ukraine has caused critics to question his foreign policy priorities, not to mention his resolve. At one point he was asked what was "the guiding principle" of the Obama Doctrine. After arguing that American relations with Asian countries "have never been stronger," the president challenged those who have outspokenly questioned, as he put it, "the failure to use military force. " Indeed, he has specifically declared there is "no military solution" to the Ukraine crisis, causing some to doubt his toughness.
NEWS
September 25, 2013
Secretary of State John Kerry's meeting with Iran's foreign minister ("Kerry to meet Iran's foreign minister at UN in first face-to-face talks since 1979," Sept. 23) represents a good first step for direct negotiations between the U.S. and Iran, a country that does not threaten U.S. national interests. Hopefully, President Barack Obama will also meet with the new Iranian president, Hasan Rowhani, who has been reaching out to the West since entering office. It is past time for the U.S. to stop allowing Israel and its powerful lobby to dictate our foreign policy, which has caused us so much harm and expense.
NEWS
September 3, 2013
More than 1,400 people dead, 400 of them children, from rocket attacks spreading a chemical agent, most likely sarin, on civilians living outside Damascus. Those gruesome deaths ought to be the focus of U.S. and world attention - people suffering, convulsing, vomiting, laboring to breathe their last as the muscles around their lungs are paralyzed. Surely, there was a time when a decisive U.S. military response to such outrageous behavior by Syrian dictator Bashar Assad would have been a foregone conclusion.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
Having vowed that any use of chemical weapons by Syria would cross a U.S. "red line" and provoke a strong American response "with enormous consequences," President Barack Obama now finds himself under increasing pressure to act, following reports by U.S. and foreign intelligence agencies that the regime of President Bashar Assad used deadly sarin gas against opponents last year. The problem for Mr. Obama is that the military options for enforcing his promise range from bad to very bad - while the risks of doing nothing may be even worse.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush, hinting anew at possible military action against Iraq, refused yesterday to ease the pressure until Baghdad demonstrates that it will allow unfettered international surprise inspections of its weapons programs."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 23, 2002
WASHINGTON - Congress will soon pass a resolution giving President Bush power to take military action against Iraq, Republicans and Democrats predicted yesterday, but Democrats called for some refinements. "It's much too broad," Sen. Carl Levin, the Michigan Democrat who is chairman of the Armed Services Committee, said on Fox News Sunday. "There's no limit at all on presidential powers. It's not even limited to Iraq." Rep. Henry J. Hyde, the Illinois Republican who is chairman of the House International Relations Committee, said on CNN that he was "personally satisfied" with the draft resolution's language but that "it's going to go through a markup process" in his committee, possibly this week.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | November 19, 2012
Until this year, the world would have been looking at the intensifying armed confrontation between Israel and Palestinians in the Gaza Strip with a sense of deja vu all over again. But this is 2012, and the political map of the Middle East has changed dramatically in ways that make the Israel-Gaza confrontation far more dangerous for every country in the region, especially those that border Israel and Palestine. Great danger also exists for the United States and Europe in the latest confrontation.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
The fast and loose talk being thrown around by the Israelis, the administration and the Romney camp about drawing lines in the sand for Iran to cross should be very worrisome to all Americans. All parties mentioned above share the imperative that Iran should not have a nuclear weapon, but getting there is the problem. The Israelis and Mitt Romney embrace the line in the sand approach; if the line is crossed, a military attack will be imminent. The consequences of this approach can be very troubling.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.