Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMiles
IN THE NEWS

Miles

NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2000
WHILE TRAVELING down Uniontown Road in Westminster in the morning, drivers are likely to see an older gentleman walking at a brisk pace along the sidewalk. Not a terribly unusual sight. But what those drivers don't realize is that this 70-year-old man, a survivor of prostate cancer, has just passed the 25,000-mile mark in his near-daily travels. "When I first started, I'd keep track of the miles and look at it as if I was going cross country," said Marvin Fuchs, who started jogging about 24 years ago when he became more conscious of his health.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 17, 2009
A California scientist using the Hubble Space Telescope has discovered the smallest object ever seen in the Kuiper Belt - the vast region of icy objects beyond the orbit of Neptune. The unnamed object is estimated to be 3,200 feet in diameter - just over a half-mile. Hubble detected it from 4.2 billion miles. The next-smallest known Kuiper Belt object is 30 miles in diameter. CalTech astronomer Hilke Schlichting and her team found the tiny object by scouring 4 1/2 years of data from Hubble's Fine Guidance Sensor.
NEWS
October 29, 1999
Doug Ulman, a three-time cancer survivor whose story appeared Oct. 22 in The Sun, wrote this report yesterday after running the first day of the Himalayan 100 Mile Stage Race in Sandakphu National Park, India.Ulman, 22, originally planned to run only the Mount Everest Challenge Marathon -- the third stage of the five-day race. Now he hopes to cover the full 100 miles.Ulman is a member of a team of able-bodied and disabled athletes sponsored by World T.E.A.M. Sports, a nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing diverse groups together through sports.
NEWS
By Deidre McCabe and Deidre McCabe,Staff writer | April 27, 1992
The accomplishment was great; the acclaim, meager.After walking 12 miles on one leg, using a crutch and new artificial leg, 20-year-old Raymond Maxie, of The Provinces, ended his arduous journey Saturday without fanfare.The onlookers and most of the volunteers had gone home. The food was packed away, the folding chairs stacked neatly against one wall.After walking for nearly five hours in the annual March of Dimes Walk for Healthier Babies, Maxie arrived at an empty plaza. The last of the other 400 walkers had finished more than an hour earlier.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1996
*TC Attorney Stephen L. Miles, facing a $3 million claim in a defamation and privacy-invasion lawsuit, has learned that his malpractice insurer may not pay off if he loses the case, according to court documents.Baltimore police Lt. Charles J. Key Sr. sued Miles in August in Anne Arundel Circuit Court, accusing the lawyer of defaming him by calling him a liar and a Nazi in radio and television broadcasts aired when Miles represented Nathaniel Hurt in April 1995.Key, a firearms expert, was a prosecution witness in that case.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
A retired police firearms expert will collect an apology from Stephen L. Miles and $75,000 from the lawyer's insurance carrier for him calling the expert a liar in a TV broadcast.Lt. Charles J. Key Sr., the retired director of firearms training for the Baltimore Police Department, has agreed to settle the defamation suit he filed in 1995 in exchange for the money and apology. A two-week trial was scheduled to begin today.Michael P. May, Key's lawyer, said the settlement was reached about a week ago. He is going over the wording of the apology.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | August 19, 1995
A Baltimore police firearms expert has sued Stephen L. Miles, charging that the well-known lawyer defamed him by calling him a liar and a Nazi in radio and television broadcasts aired when Mr. Miles represented Nathaniel Hurt in April.Lt. Charles J. Key Sr., director of firearms training for the police, filed the suit yesterday in Anne Arundel Circuit Court. He claimed that Mr. Miles called him "an absolute liar" in a television interview and a "lying Nazi, a Gestapo member and an overzealous gun nut" in a radio program broadcast a day after Mr. Key, of Glen Burnie, testified against Hurt.
BUSINESS
By Neil Downing and Neil Downing,PROVIDENCE JOURNAL | October 1, 2000
My need is to find a MasterCard or Visa that allows all dollar charges to be applied to frequent-flier miles with no time limitation. I estimate spending about $10,000 yearly and, in three to five years, I'd accrue enough to take a trip by using these 30,000 points. "It's harder and harder to find the kind of card to fill your particular needs," said Nancy Ness Judy, spokeswoman for Myvesta.org, a nonprofit organization in Maryland that shows consumers how to get out of debt. Many airlines have the kind of card you're talking about.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | August 21, 1991
Two local groups interested in buying the Orioles say they have been unable to reach current owner Eli S. Jacobs, leading them to conclude he may not want to sell to them.Jacobs, a publicity-shy New York financier, said in June that he was exploring some unsolicited offers for the team. He has refused any public comment since.Soon after the Jacobs announcement, Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, clothing store magnate and former Baltimorean, said he was interested in buying the team, possibly with some investment by filmmaker Barry Levinson.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | September 25, 1992
Who exactly was Henry W. Miles, a Baltimore commercial painter who left behind a delightful legacy of handmade miniature carriages, wagons, horsecars and buses?Curators at the Peale Museum are seeking the life story of the elusive gentleman-artisan who died in Baltimore in 1936. For nearly 60 years, the man must have spent his evenings and free time laboriously carving replicas of the vehicles he'd seen around town -- the old horsecars that rumbled past Franklin Square (Fayette and Carey streets)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.