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NEWS
December 27, 2000
What's for dinner? Penguins eat fish and squid. Positively Penguins... Some penguins like it cold. These penguins like it hot. African penguins live on islands off the coast of South Africa where the air is warm, but the water is cold. Like all penguins, African penguins can't fly in the air, but they can swim quickly under water, so they look like they are "flying." Using flipper-like wings to propel and feet and tail to steer, a penguin can swim 15 to 20 miles per hour.
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NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2012
The National Weather Service has a wind advisory in effect until 6 p.m. Saturday for the Baltimore area. A wind advisory means that wind gusts over 45 mph are expected, and can make driving difficult, especially for "high-profile" vehicles. The weather service is forecasting winds of 20 to 30 mph, with gusts up to 50 mph. Forecasters say the strongest winds will be Saturday morning and afternoon. They advise motorists to use extra caution. Otherwise, the weather service is calling for Saturday to be mostly sunny, with a high near 49. There is a slight chance of showers before 2 p.m., then a chance of scattered showers and snow showers between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Little or no snow accumulation is expected.
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NEWS
August 12, 2005
This month 175 years ago, Howard County was the site of a milestone in American transportation history. It was on Aug. 28, 1830, that "Peter Cooper ran his locomotive, the 'Tom Thumb,' along the Patapsco at the unbelievable speed of 18 miles per hour," according to Barbara W. Feaga's article in Howard's Roads To the Past. "A short time later, Mr. Cooper raced his locomotive with one of horse-drawn coaches between Relay House and Baltimore. Although the locomotive lost the contest, the supremacy of steam power was firmly established over horse power."
NEWS
May 22, 2009
Our view Gov. Martin O'Malley signed some pretty controversial bills Tuesday, but probably none will draw as much attention as his approval of a measure allowing speed cameras near schools and highway construction zones around the state. A referendum drive is already under way to repeal the legislation, and organizers have about a fifth of the signatures they need. I certainly have no problem with bringing this one to the ballot. So far, most of the discussion on this legislation has been dominated by the people who see speed cameras as Big Brotherish intrusion, with relatively little from parents who might not mind the idea of slowing people down near schools.
FEATURES
August 11, 1999
IVAN "PUDGE" RODRIGUEZIvan "Pudge" Rodriguez of the Texas Rangers is a force on and off the field. He is a seven-time All Star and has won seven Gold Glove awards for fielding. He helps needy kids and kids with cancer.Ivan's idol growing up in Puerto Rico was Hall-of-Fame outfielder Roberto Clemente. Roberto also did a lot of volunteer work."Roberto spent a lot of time helping people," says Ivan. "I want to do the same things."ATHLETES vs. ANIMALSSwimmer Amy Van Dyken won four gold medals at the 1996 Summer Olympics.
NEWS
By JON MORGAN and JON MORGAN,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1997
Spring officially began last Thursday at 8:56 a.m., one of the two days a year when the sun crosses the equator and day and night are of nearly equal length.Unofficially, it begins on major-league baseball's Opening Day. Or the day you can begin a soccer game without wearing a jacket. Or can consider playing tennis outdoors. Or - especially in the Northeast - begin to play lacrosse without freezing.They are spring's true planets, the small, round objects that you bat, kick, whack or hurl.
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | July 4, 2001
Proud Patriot The bald eagle was chosen on June 20, 1782, as the emblem of the United States of America because of its strength and majestic looks. The image of the eagle can be seen on all gold coins, the silver dollar, half dollars and quarters. What's for Dinner? Bald eagles live along the coastline and near water, so their diet is mostly fish. Do you know? How fast can an eagle fly? Answer: Some migrating eagles can catch columns of rising air and reach speeds of 30 miles per hour!
NEWS
July 13, 1997
Earth invaded Mars July 4 as the Pathfinder spacecraft, wrapped in an airbag coccoon, bounced to a landing on the planet's surface. It quickly dispatched its robot rock hound, called Sojourner. And Sojourner has had plenty of rocks to sniff: the site is an ancient flood plain, where an epic-scale deluge deposited a mixture of minerals. Where the water went is still a mystery.Meet the red planetDistance from sun: 141.6 million milesDiameter: 4,217 milesGravity: 40 percent of Earth'sLength of day: 24.62 hours (called a sol)
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 25, 1998
HERE'S HOW the accident went down, according to the official state police report:"Vehicle one failed to stop and rear-ended vehicle two. Vehicle two spun out and vehicle five hit vehicle two. Vehicle one then rear-ended vehicle three. Vehicle one then spun out and hit vehicle four. Vehicles one, two, four and five were disabled. Vehicle three was drivable. The drivers of vehicles two and five were taken to a nearby hospital and treated."I was driving vehicle four. I may not be driving much longer.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | January 7, 1996
Recently the federal government, as part of its ongoing effort to become part of the same solar system as the rest of us, decided to eliminate the National Pretend Speed Limit.As you are aware, for many years the National Pretend Speed Limit was 55 miles per hour (metric equivalent: 378 kilograms per hectare). This limit was established back during the Energy TTC Crisis, when America went through a scary gasoline shortage caused by the fact that for about six straight months, everybody in America spent every waking moment purchasing gasoline.
NEWS
July 23, 2007
Once again, Congress is embracing a no-frills approach to keeping Amtrak viable and whole for another year despite the Bush administration's efforts to diminish intercity passenger rail service. Recently, the House and Senate appropriations committees agreed to a modest increase in Amtrak funding from $1.3 billion this year to $1.4 billion in the House version and $1.37 billion in the Senate. That may not fly with President Bush, who wanted only $800 million spent on Amtrak, a move that would have resulted in draconian cuts to service, particularly to parts of the country outside the Northeast.
NEWS
August 12, 2005
This month 175 years ago, Howard County was the site of a milestone in American transportation history. It was on Aug. 28, 1830, that "Peter Cooper ran his locomotive, the 'Tom Thumb,' along the Patapsco at the unbelievable speed of 18 miles per hour," according to Barbara W. Feaga's article in Howard's Roads To the Past. "A short time later, Mr. Cooper raced his locomotive with one of horse-drawn coaches between Relay House and Baltimore. Although the locomotive lost the contest, the supremacy of steam power was firmly established over horse power."
NEWS
By Mark Cloud | September 22, 2002
ATLANTA -- I can sense your frustration. You see, unlike most people, I am extremely sensitive to the feelings of others. It only takes a quick look, and my highly attuned sense of empathy allows me to determine a person's mood. That's why, even though we are in separate cars, I can tell you are unhappy. Simply by glancing in my rearview mirror, I am able to see from the grimace on your face and the veins bulging in your neck and the death grip you have on the wheel that you are not in a good place right now. It's not necessary for you to pull your car up directly behind mine, nearly touching my rear bumper, for me to become aware of your disappointment.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2002
Packing winds of more than 261 miles per hour, the strongest tornado in Maryland's history passed within an estimated two miles of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant in Calvert County on Sunday. Plant officials said yesterday that although the state had never before experienced a twister of such magnitude, the nuclear facility, perched on a slope overlooking the Chesapeake Bay, could have withstood the violent storm. "The plant is designed to withstand tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, a wide range of events," spokesman Karl Neddenien said of the power plant owned and operated by Constellation Energy Group, parent company of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. Photographs taken Sunday evening, apparently by a plant employee from an area on the grounds that looks toward the bay, have circulated in recent days showing the spinning funnel cloud touching down in the water as it moved east toward Dorchester County.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 10, 2002
You can skip this column. I'm sure you have more important things to do. You don't need to waste your valuable time reading about how MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, POSSIBLY INCLUDING YOU, RECENTLY WERE ALMOST KILLED BY A GIANT SPACE ROCK AND THERE ARE MORE COMING AND NOBODY IS DOING ANYTHING ABOUT IT. Excuse me for going into CAPS LOCK mode, but I am a little upset here. In case you didn't hear about it, which you probably didn't: On Jan. 7, an asteroid 1,000 feet across -- nearly three times the current diameter of Marlon Brando -- barely missed the Earth, which is most likely your planet of residence.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 1, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - Their jets sound like souped-up vacuum cleaners and their mission is as unglamorous as it is important. They are the VS-29 Dragonfires, the gas guys who fill up the bombers so they can make their runs to Afghanistan. The gas guys fly 25-year-old S-3B Viking jets, part of a string of airborne "gas stations" that are the New Jersey Turnpike rest stops of the sky for the bombers taking off here in the Arabian Sea. They can be found walking around a pilot ready-room waving a water pistol, offering Halloween candy to a visitor or wearing a Norse helmet and blond locks as they prepare for a catapult off an aircraft carrier.
NEWS
July 23, 2007
Once again, Congress is embracing a no-frills approach to keeping Amtrak viable and whole for another year despite the Bush administration's efforts to diminish intercity passenger rail service. Recently, the House and Senate appropriations committees agreed to a modest increase in Amtrak funding from $1.3 billion this year to $1.4 billion in the House version and $1.37 billion in the Senate. That may not fly with President Bush, who wanted only $800 million spent on Amtrak, a move that would have resulted in draconian cuts to service, particularly to parts of the country outside the Northeast.
NEWS
By THE BALTIMORE ZOO | July 4, 2001
Proud Patriot The bald eagle was chosen on June 20, 1782, as the emblem of the United States of America because of its strength and majestic looks. The image of the eagle can be seen on all gold coins, the silver dollar, half dollars and quarters. What's for Dinner? Bald eagles live along the coastline and near water, so their diet is mostly fish. Do you know? How fast can an eagle fly? Answer: Some migrating eagles can catch columns of rising air and reach speeds of 30 miles per hour!
NEWS
December 27, 2000
What's for dinner? Penguins eat fish and squid. Positively Penguins... Some penguins like it cold. These penguins like it hot. African penguins live on islands off the coast of South Africa where the air is warm, but the water is cold. Like all penguins, African penguins can't fly in the air, but they can swim quickly under water, so they look like they are "flying." Using flipper-like wings to propel and feet and tail to steer, a penguin can swim 15 to 20 miles per hour.
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