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NEWS
August 22, 2012
When I was a salesman who had to see accounts in person, I was allowed to claim expenses from my first stop to my last. Nobody could claim the mileage expenses of getting to work, or getting home. For 10 years, getting to work in Northern Virginia would have added $61 a day, $305 a week, or in total $15,250 a year, not counting the miles from doing my work. Had I been able to use the method City Councilwoman Rochelle "Rikki" Spector employs, I would have been driving a Mercedes instead of a Saturn.
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NEWS
August 22, 2012
When I was a salesman who had to see accounts in person, I was allowed to claim expenses from my first stop to my last. Nobody could claim the mileage expenses of getting to work, or getting home. For 10 years, getting to work in Northern Virginia would have added $61 a day, $305 a week, or in total $15,250 a year, not counting the miles from doing my work. Had I been able to use the method City Councilwoman Rochelle "Rikki" Spector employs, I would have been driving a Mercedes instead of a Saturn.
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NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
At issue: City Councilwoman Rochelle "Rikki" Spector routinely bills the city for driving to her Northwest Baltimore district - trips she says often begin at the Inner Harbor condominium where she lives with her boyfriend. The cost: Spector, who has served on the council since 1977, filed for more than $3,000 in mileage for travel within the city during a 13-month period, according to her expense reports, an average of more than 400 miles a month. Only one other city legislator, Councilwoman Helen Holton, bills the city for travel within Baltimore; she submitted less than $200 in travel charges within city limits for the same period.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
At issue: City Councilwoman Rochelle "Rikki" Spector routinely bills the city for driving to her Northwest Baltimore district - trips she says often begin at the Inner Harbor condominium where she lives with her boyfriend. The cost: Spector, who has served on the council since 1977, filed for more than $3,000 in mileage for travel within the city during a 13-month period, according to her expense reports, an average of more than 400 miles a month. Only one other city legislator, Councilwoman Helen Holton, bills the city for travel within Baltimore; she submitted less than $200 in travel charges within city limits for the same period.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | January 29, 2010
Amazing what a difference a sensible law can make. Two years ago, Congress and President George W. Bush agreed to reduce pollution and America's addiction to overseas oil by requiring automobiles to get better mileage. Now, General Motors is spending $246 million to expand its White Marsh plant and make its own electric motors, giving Baltimore a ride on the auto-technology pace car. Barring an unlikely decision to resurrect GM's auto-assembly plant here, it's hard to imagine better news for regional manufacturing.
NEWS
By Dan Becker and James Gerstenzang | November 27, 2009
E veryone knows that $4 gasoline in 2008 finally led Americans to abandon their gas guzzlers and start buying gas sippers - right? Turns out, everyone is wrong. According to a new report released with little fanfare last week by the Environmental Protection Agency, Americans bought vehicles in 2008 that averaged only 0.4 mpg better than a year earlier, when gas cost nearly 50 cents less. Yes, some car buyers looked for ways to drive cheaper. Some dealers ran out of highly efficient hybrids.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
You've got 72 hours - well, less than that at this point - to book a flight for $35 one-way on Southwest Airlines. The airline is launching its annual (or is it semi-annual?) sale where the fares are based on the number of miles in your flight. For travel of 450 miles or less, one-way fares are $35. For travel 451 to 1,000 miles, one-way fares are $65. For travel 1,001 to 1,500 miles, one-way fares are $95. And for travel 1,501 or more miles, one-way fares are $125. For example, from Baltimore, $35 will take you to Boston, Detroit, Hartford, Newark and Pittsburgh.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 12, 2011
So,it sounds like there's a respite in store for those who have been struggling with rising gas prices , according to Mike Dresser over at Getting There. While the average price around the state has exceeded $4 a gallon, it's not expected to stay there, Dresser reported. Whether it will drop by Memorial Day remains to be seen, but hopefully this summer won't be as painful for drivers as it has been in the past. But regardless of whether gas prices are over or under $4 per gallon, it makes good fiscal sense to improve the fuel economy of our vehicles.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 15, 2009
For years, I have suffered with high expectations. If the car I bought in 1979 got 30 miles to the gallon, if the fuel-efficiency was that good back then, didn't it follow that, with technological advances, a similar car purchased by 1999 would be getting 50 - and by 2009, maybe 60 - miles per gallon? Wouldn't there have been a steady progression in fuel efficiency for all makes and models, including minivans and SUVs? Wasn't that what Americans wanted? John Davis, the host of Maryland Public Television's MotorWeek, has taken my questions and explained why this didn't happen: SUVs happened, trucks happened, cheap gas happened.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1989 Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 11, 1990
It's unlikely the price you pay for gasoline at your local service station will come down any time soon.Meantime, automobiles that get good gas mileage will be at a premium, especially on the used car market. The difference between the cars that got the best mileage per gallon in the mid-1970s and those that got the worst, as I recall it, was somewhat broader than it is now. There are far fewer "gas hogs" today than there were 15 years ago.That having been said, as gasoline rises toward and above $1.50 per gallon, you are likely to give more consideration to gas mileage when you choose a car.What's more, the gas price boom will limit your bargaining space when negotiating the purchase of a new, small car. On the other hand, it will produce some real bargains among mid-size cars.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
Death and taxes might be certain, but the latter changes each year. Even without major tax legislation — thanks, political gridlock — taxpayers need to be aware of even slight adjustments that could benefit them as they prepare their returns. This season, filers will come across new tax forms, a twist on an education tax break that can benefit parents of high school students, and changes in mileage reimbursements. Here are tips for lessening your tax bite and a suggestion for putting your refund to good use. Consider: First-time homebuyer credit This popular $8,000 credit expired for most people in 2010.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
You've got 72 hours - well, less than that at this point - to book a flight for $35 one-way on Southwest Airlines. The airline is launching its annual (or is it semi-annual?) sale where the fares are based on the number of miles in your flight. For travel of 450 miles or less, one-way fares are $35. For travel 451 to 1,000 miles, one-way fares are $65. For travel 1,001 to 1,500 miles, one-way fares are $95. And for travel 1,501 or more miles, one-way fares are $125. For example, from Baltimore, $35 will take you to Boston, Detroit, Hartford, Newark and Pittsburgh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
In the age when a 140-character tweet is about as literary as some folks get, and when the most obvious of observations or lamest of jokes can elicit a "LOL" response, there's something doubly refreshing about the opportunity to indulge in the long, luscious feast of language and humor currently on the boards at Center Stage . Richard Brinsley Sheridan's "The Rivals" follows in the daunting footsteps of Shakespeare's most sparkling and plot-thick comedies,...
NEWS
August 1, 2011
Lost in all the recent furor over the federal debt-ceiling and gridlocked Washington was a major breakthrough for the Obama administration and good news for the economy, national security and environment. Thanks to an accord reached with automakers, regulators, unions and the state of California, President Barack Obama proposed vehicle fuel efficiency standards last Friday that could dramatically reduce the nation's dependence on foreign oil. The new rules call for a 54.5-miles-per-gallon fleet-wide standard for cars and light trucks by 2025 - based on a 5 percent improvement each year beginning in 2017.
NEWS
July 7, 2011
Here's a quiz. Where does the U.S. rank for vehicle emission and mileage standards: A) The most advanced B) Above average C) The most lenient? The shocking answer is C. We could be reducing our dependence on foreign oil by billions of barrels, global warming emissions by millions of tons, and we could be saving American families billions of dollars in fuel costs just by increasing national standards to a level equivalent with China, Europe and...
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | June 24, 2011
Beginning July 1, workers who use their car for business and don't get reimbursed from their employer will be able to deduct 55 1/2 cents per mile on tax returns. That's 4 1/2 cents more than the rate for the first half of this year. The IRS says it is making the adjustment because of rising gas prices this year. Those who use their cars for medical or moving purposes will be able to deduct 23.5 cents per mile, up from 19 cents.  The mileage rate for motorists using their car for charitable works remains the same at 14 cents per mile.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman and Steve Chapman,Chicago Tribune | July 23, 2007
CHICAGO -- Of all the ideas on how to combat global warming, few have more obvious appeal than producing cars that get better mileage. The Sierra Club says a boost in fuel economy standards "is the biggest single policy step" the government can take. Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois went to Detroit in May to advise the auto industry that this change would "help bring it into the 21st century." And last month, the Senate voted to require that each automaker's fleet of cars and trucks average at least 35 miles to the gallon by 2020.
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb and Michael Reeb,Staff Writer | June 30, 1992
The Baltimore Road Runners Club kicked off a week of Fourth of July celebratory running with the Yankee Doodle Dash 4-Miler Sunday at Lake Montebello.The running festivities continue this week with the Dundalk Heritage 6K Independence Day Dash, the Kingsville Firecracker 5K and the Arbutus Firecracker 10K, all on Saturday, and the Independence 4-Mile Run Sunday at Havre de Grace.Neville Anderson kicked off what could be a busy week of running for him with a 21-minute, 14-second, first-place finish in the Yankee Doodle Dash.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 12, 2011
So,it sounds like there's a respite in store for those who have been struggling with rising gas prices , according to Mike Dresser over at Getting There. While the average price around the state has exceeded $4 a gallon, it's not expected to stay there, Dresser reported. Whether it will drop by Memorial Day remains to be seen, but hopefully this summer won't be as painful for drivers as it has been in the past. But regardless of whether gas prices are over or under $4 per gallon, it makes good fiscal sense to improve the fuel economy of our vehicles.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 27, 2011
There are lots of good reasons to monitor your car's gas mileage, not just when gas prices spike . If you suddenly get fewer miles to the tank, it could be a sign that something is wrong with your vehicle, and a early trip to the mechanic might forestall greater damage down the road. That's why we're bringing you Fuelly as our Consumer Website of the Week, discovered via Consumerist . Create an account and enter data after you fill up, and the site will help you see how your fuel economy compares to both your past entries as well as that of other drivers who have the same make and model as you. The site even has a mobile interface so you can enter your data before you pull away from the pump.
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