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Mikhail Baryshnikov

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By Robin Givhan and Robin Givhan,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 20, 1990
Aspiring ballerinas dream of dancing a pas de deux with him. Theater critics praised his Broadway performance in "Metamorphosis," saying he made an engaging bug. Educated noses have said that his fragrance, Misha, is one of the most refreshing in a glut of celebrity perfumes.Mikhail Baryshnikov was in Detroit recently to talk about Misha, to promote it and to sell it. But, no matter what the topic of conversation, Mr. Baryshnikov always speaks of grace and elegance in the way he sits relaxed on a sofa or reaches for a cup of coffee -- cream and one sugar.
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NEWS
June 22, 2003
Columbia Festival of the Arts brings national dance, music, drama and comedy performers to town through June 29. Events will be held at several locations. Jim Rouse Theatre and Rouse Mini-Theatre are at Wilde Lake High School, 5460 Trumpeter Road, Columbia. Smith Theatre is on the campus of Howard Community College, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. Columbia SportsPark is in Harper's Choice Village Center, off Harper's Farm Road. Most tickets range from $17 to $68, with discounts for students and senior citizens.
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NEWS
June 22, 2003
Columbia Festival of the Arts brings national dance, music, drama and comedy performers to town through June 29. Events will be held at several locations. Jim Rouse Theatre and Rouse Mini-Theatre are at Wilde Lake High School, 5460 Trumpeter Road, Columbia. Smith Theatre is on the campus of Howard Community College, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. Columbia SportsPark is in Harper's Choice Village Center, off Harper's Farm Road. Most tickets range from $17 to $68, with discounts for students and senior citizens.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Rosenblum and Lauren Rosenblum,Sun Staff | June 12, 2003
Each summer, Columbia pulses with energy as it prepares for the Columbia Festival of Arts, one of the largest summer festivals in Maryland. Despite the rainy introduction to June, organizers are forging ahead to celebrate culture and art. Entering its 16th consecutive year, the two-week summer festival presents a diverse program of music, dance, theater and comedy. While last year's festival sought to bring the community together after 9 / 11, this year's festival seeks to celebrate life and innovation.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 24, 1992
Talk about bad "Company"!"Company Business," a comedy-thriller in the old East-West tradition, probably wouldn't have been any good even if the Cold War hadn't dried up and blown away, but if it had stuck around a year or so, this turkey would still gobble.It's one of those espionage things, full of intricate plot complications about double agents and controls and penetrations, in which, as per usual, the old order of butt-kicking cowboy is celebrated over the new order of computer whiz. But the movie is so dense and charmless, it just lies there.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 26, 2001
EVERY PRIVATE school dreams of hiring an inspired fund-raiser, and Severn School seems to have found one with a Midas touch. Laurette L. Hankins, who left Severna Park for the bright lights of New York and a career that mixed fund raising and show biz, took over this month as Severn School's director of development. "What an extraordinary twist of fate for me, after living in New York and elsewhere for so many years, to be able to truly come back home," Hankins said. "There are so many connections for me. My uncle, John Giddings, was a member of the Severn Class of 1950, and one of my best friends in high school, Cindy Ward, is the daughter of the late Adm. Alfred G. Ward, Severn's headmaster at the time."
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | August 22, 1991
It is not at all unusual to hear about major rock acts having disharmony from within.Such groups as Poison and Ratt have risen to the top of the business with careers littered with internal struggles and bickering -- what you might call artistic differences.The surprise comes when band members throw money, success and reputation out the window and actually split up.White Lion, a multi-platinum band whose 1987 hits "Wait" and "When the Children Cry" are still played regularly on the radio, had just released its third album, "Mane Attraction," in late spring when the internal strife hit a boiling point while on tour in Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren Rosenblum and Lauren Rosenblum,Sun Staff | June 12, 2003
Each summer, Columbia pulses with energy as it prepares for the Columbia Festival of Arts, one of the largest summer festivals in Maryland. Despite the rainy introduction to June, organizers are forging ahead to celebrate culture and art. Entering its 16th consecutive year, the two-week summer festival presents a diverse program of music, dance, theater and comedy. While last year's festival sought to bring the community together after 9 / 11, this year's festival seeks to celebrate life and innovation.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 5, 1992
Alexander Toradze will walk out on stage in Meyerhoff Hall next Thursday to tame the man-eating Rachmaninov Third Piano Concerto, the most gloriously beautiful and astoundingly difficult all works for piano and orchestra.Toradze lives in South Bend, Ind., but in birth and training he is Russian. Of course.Most of the pianists who have conquered the Third Rachmaninov's difficulties -- beginning with the composer himself -- have been Russian. Their ability to play technically demanding music has almost come to seem the natural way.In more than 60 years of international competitions, Russian pianists have consistently won the Ivory Wars, pounding the opposition to smithereens, losing a skirmish only here and there.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Staff | March 22, 1998
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - The apartment building wouldn't be out of place in an East Baltimore slum - except slums don't always look this bad in East Baltimore, and the weather is rarely so cold. It's minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit in the city this evening.There is no elevator. You walk up two flights of stairs to Yuri Temirkanov's apartment."Welcome to Russia," says Temirkanov in perfect English - among the few words he will speak in that language tonight - as he greets the visitor and his translator.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
The stage at Jim Rouse Theatre is about to take a beating from some of the most talented feet in the world. During Columbia Festival of the Arts, which begins tomorrow, Dayton Contemporary Dance Company will showcase several pieces celebrating the 100th anniversary of flight. Rennie Harris Puremovement will perform a new work, "Facing Mekka," grounded in hip-hop dance. International dance star Mikhail Baryshnikov will provide a grand finale for the festival with performances June 28 and 29. The three groups "were chosen because of the diversity they represent," said Stewart J. Seal, executive director of Columbia Festival of the Arts.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 26, 2001
EVERY PRIVATE school dreams of hiring an inspired fund-raiser, and Severn School seems to have found one with a Midas touch. Laurette L. Hankins, who left Severna Park for the bright lights of New York and a career that mixed fund raising and show biz, took over this month as Severn School's director of development. "What an extraordinary twist of fate for me, after living in New York and elsewhere for so many years, to be able to truly come back home," Hankins said. "There are so many connections for me. My uncle, John Giddings, was a member of the Severn Class of 1950, and one of my best friends in high school, Cindy Ward, is the daughter of the late Adm. Alfred G. Ward, Severn's headmaster at the time."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Staff | March 22, 1998
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - The apartment building wouldn't be out of place in an East Baltimore slum - except slums don't always look this bad in East Baltimore, and the weather is rarely so cold. It's minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit in the city this evening.There is no elevator. You walk up two flights of stairs to Yuri Temirkanov's apartment."Welcome to Russia," says Temirkanov in perfect English - among the few words he will speak in that language tonight - as he greets the visitor and his translator.
NEWS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | April 14, 1996
"I never thought I would dance for so long," said Mikhail Baryshnikov.Mr. Baryshnikov, 48, remains one of the most extraordinary dancers of this century. He continues to receive high praise for his dancing, as he has done since he was an 18-year-old living in Russia."Encouragement from Merce [Cunningham] and Martha Graham, even Mark [Morris] and Twyla [Tharp] and Paul Taylor gave me a new life," he said recently.Unlike Rudolf Nureyev, another great 20th-century Russian dancer who danced classical roles deep into middle age with depressing results, Mr. Baryshnikov knew when the days of white tights and leading romantic roles in ballet were over.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 24, 1992
Talk about bad "Company"!"Company Business," a comedy-thriller in the old East-West tradition, probably wouldn't have been any good even if the Cold War hadn't dried up and blown away, but if it had stuck around a year or so, this turkey would still gobble.It's one of those espionage things, full of intricate plot complications about double agents and controls and penetrations, in which, as per usual, the old order of butt-kicking cowboy is celebrated over the new order of computer whiz. But the movie is so dense and charmless, it just lies there.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 5, 1992
Alexander Toradze will walk out on stage in Meyerhoff Hall next Thursday to tame the man-eating Rachmaninov Third Piano Concerto, the most gloriously beautiful and astoundingly difficult all works for piano and orchestra.Toradze lives in South Bend, Ind., but in birth and training he is Russian. Of course.Most of the pianists who have conquered the Third Rachmaninov's difficulties -- beginning with the composer himself -- have been Russian. Their ability to play technically demanding music has almost come to seem the natural way.In more than 60 years of international competitions, Russian pianists have consistently won the Ivory Wars, pounding the opposition to smithereens, losing a skirmish only here and there.
NEWS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | April 14, 1996
"I never thought I would dance for so long," said Mikhail Baryshnikov.Mr. Baryshnikov, 48, remains one of the most extraordinary dancers of this century. He continues to receive high praise for his dancing, as he has done since he was an 18-year-old living in Russia."Encouragement from Merce [Cunningham] and Martha Graham, even Mark [Morris] and Twyla [Tharp] and Paul Taylor gave me a new life," he said recently.Unlike Rudolf Nureyev, another great 20th-century Russian dancer who danced classical roles deep into middle age with depressing results, Mr. Baryshnikov knew when the days of white tights and leading romantic roles in ballet were over.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
The stage at Jim Rouse Theatre is about to take a beating from some of the most talented feet in the world. During Columbia Festival of the Arts, which begins tomorrow, Dayton Contemporary Dance Company will showcase several pieces celebrating the 100th anniversary of flight. Rennie Harris Puremovement will perform a new work, "Facing Mekka," grounded in hip-hop dance. International dance star Mikhail Baryshnikov will provide a grand finale for the festival with performances June 28 and 29. The three groups "were chosen because of the diversity they represent," said Stewart J. Seal, executive director of Columbia Festival of the Arts.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | August 22, 1991
It is not at all unusual to hear about major rock acts having disharmony from within.Such groups as Poison and Ratt have risen to the top of the business with careers littered with internal struggles and bickering -- what you might call artistic differences.The surprise comes when band members throw money, success and reputation out the window and actually split up.White Lion, a multi-platinum band whose 1987 hits "Wait" and "When the Children Cry" are still played regularly on the radio, had just released its third album, "Mane Attraction," in late spring when the internal strife hit a boiling point while on tour in Europe.
FEATURES
By Robin Givhan and Robin Givhan,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 20, 1990
Aspiring ballerinas dream of dancing a pas de deux with him. Theater critics praised his Broadway performance in "Metamorphosis," saying he made an engaging bug. Educated noses have said that his fragrance, Misha, is one of the most refreshing in a glut of celebrity perfumes.Mikhail Baryshnikov was in Detroit recently to talk about Misha, to promote it and to sell it. But, no matter what the topic of conversation, Mr. Baryshnikov always speaks of grace and elegance in the way he sits relaxed on a sofa or reaches for a cup of coffee -- cream and one sugar.
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